B string setup question

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Vorago, Aug 29, 2004.

  1. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium
    Probably covered before, but I did a search and couldn't find it...

    Here it goes;

    I recently purchased a Warwick Corvette 5string '98. Great bass, great tone etc, the only thing that bothers me is the B string. It seems to be much looser and it has a higher action then the other strings. I have been trying to set the B as low as the other strings, but this doesn't seem to work without getting buzz from the other strings...
    I have no idea what gauge is currently, since it was a second handed bass.

    Are there any tricks to tighten up the B string? A way to get the action as low as the other strings?

  2. Given that this is a second hand bass and you have no idea of the age or quality of the strings, purchase a good brand and put them on. If your bass still has the original strings, you could be long overdue for a change, especially if they are round wounds.
  3. Nino Valenti

    Nino Valenti Supporting Member Commercial User

    Feb 2, 2001
    Staten Island NYC
    Builder: Valenti Basses
  4. Steve


    Aug 10, 2001
    I don't have floppy "B" syndrome but...I bought a set of Dean Markly strings (the Will Lee set) once.

    My first thought was, "Wow! These suckers are STIFF"

    It was like yanking on a bow string. They didn't sound bad either.
  5. Vorago

    Vorago (((o)))

    Jul 17, 2003
    Antwerp, Belgium
    Ah well, another question, I used to have D'Adario's on my former bass, regular roundwounds...any suggestions on the strings that I should buy, this is a subject on which I am pretty n00b...
  6. nonsqtr

    nonsqtr The emperor has no clothes!

    Aug 29, 2003
    Burbank CA USA
    D'Addario EXL's are a little floppier than some. Try a set of Smiths, like the Rock Master Medium's. With that set, I use a .125 non-taper for the B string. You can set it really low and get a nice grind out of it, or you can take it high and it'll sound great too. Nice consistent strings.
  7. Suburban


    Jan 15, 2001
    lower mid Sweden
    The limit of how low action you can have depends on the gauge. The heavier string, the more amplitude for a certain energy. And then it needs more space to vibrate.
    If you look at a contrabasso, you'll notice that the curvature is broken for the E-string, just to allow for this extra amplitude.

    Strings are more or less stiff, but the physics are hard to get away from - you'll not be able to have the same action, and play with the same energy, on each string.