1. Please take 30 seconds to register your free account to remove most ads, post topics, make friends, earn reward points at our store, and more!  

Bad buzz from a restring of the same strings

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by jessicabass, Jun 20, 2014.


Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. jessicabass

    jessicabass

    Dec 22, 2009
    ohio
    Yesterday morning i took my strings off to try on another bass. The bass was stringless for maybe 1 1/2 hours. Put the same strings back on and the bass is buzzing like crazy.
    I let it sit for over a day to adjust back but it never did. Now when i go to set it up its not comfortable to my liking anymore.
    Does this happen alot?
    Is it just waiting longer to settle back?
    Its made a bass i enjoy playing into not so much.
     
  2. FretNoMore

    FretNoMore * Cooking with GAS *

    Jan 25, 2002
    The frozen north
    You may have to give it some time, or maybe loosen the truss rod a bit to let the neck come back and then tighten it again later.

    It's a good idea to not remove all the strings like that, and also to change one string at a time to change the tension as little as possible. But I guess you know that already now ...
     
  3. Technotitclan

    Technotitclan Lurking TB from work

    Mar 1, 2012
    Rochester, NY
    I've done what you described a number of times. One of my three basses does not take kindly to it at all. I would recommend you take off the strings and loosen the truss so that there is no pressure on the neck at all and let it sit like that for about a day. Restring the next day and perform setup.

    The bass of mine that has this issue is usually ok if I loosen the strings then loosen the truss then tune strings to pitch and adjust neck to suit again. But not all basses are equals so YMMV.
     
  4. Lownote38

    Lownote38

    Aug 8, 2013
    Nashville, TN
    One string at a time when I change them. Always.
     
  5. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    The one string at a time thing is totally unnecessary. Removing them all won't harm the neck at all. Check the relief on the neck, if there isn't enough relief back off on the truss rod a bit and recheck. Chances are you will have to put the back bow you took out of the neck back into it in a day or so, which is also not a big deal. Bass necks are adjustable for a reason.
     
    96tbird and Jools4001 like this.
  6. Ric5

    Ric5 Supporting Member

    Jan 29, 2008
    Colorado
    As far as I am concerned that is a myth.

    I have owned over 70 basses and worked on dozens more. I build frankensteined parts basses and necks can sit in my shop for days, weeks, or months without strings on them. I have NEVER EVER seen that problem with ANY of the basses that I own or work on. I ALWAYS remove all the strings before putting on new strings. I will often clean the fretboard or work on the frets. I even convert 4 string basses into 5 string basses and during the conversion the strings are off the neck for several days.
     
    96tbird, Jools4001 and Hopkins like this.
  7. FretNoMore

    FretNoMore * Cooking with GAS *

    Jan 25, 2002
    The frozen north
    OK ... that's your experience, but it doesn't make it universally true. As the OPs instrument clearly shows - unless you have another explanation for the change in neck bow.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2014
  8. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    The OP's neck moved due to a sudden change, and can easily be readjusted. There is nothing wrong with her neck, no harm will come to a neck by removing all of the strings. If this were true, then replacing a bridge, nut, pickups ect would be impossible. The truss rod is there for a reason. Changing the strings one at a time is a myth, just like when people say you should only adjust your truss rod no more than 1/4 turn per day.
     
    96tbird likes this.
  9. tangentmusic

    tangentmusic A figment of our exaggeration

    Aug 17, 2007
    Reno/Tahoe
    Has anyone considered the strings themselves may be shot due to age and removing and then replacing them twice in 1 day?
     
    Technotitclan and 96tbird like this.
  10. Ewo

    Ewo a/k/a Steve Cooper Supporting Member

    Apr 2, 2008
    Huntington WV
    That's my routine, too. The only exception is when it's time to oil a rosewood fingerboard. To do that I take 'em all off.

    From the posts above, seems like people have had different experiences. It would make sense to me, given that necks vary quite a bit. I got into the one-string-at-a-time routine in the 70s, when I was playing Fenders that--in comparison to the Sadowskys I use now--had pretty rubbery necks with single-action truss rods. I figured it was good to keep the string tension as constant as possible, given that the neck bow is the equilibrium point of the opposing forces of the string tension and truss rod.

    Anyway...OP, it's a good investment of your time to learn about doing your own setups. There's some good material here on TB. I like Gary Willis's approach in his 101 Tips book. And Carl Pedigo's youtube vids will be helpful. That way you'll know what to do to get your bass to feel the way you prefer.
     
  11. Ric5

    Ric5 Supporting Member

    Jan 29, 2008
    Colorado
    That is my experience with over 100 different instruments, basses, electric and acoustic guitars, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10 string basses, 6 and 12 string guitars. Made from the 1960s to 2011 many different manufacturers and different truss rod systems and different woods, etc ...


    I have never and will never take off one string at a time and replace it. And I have never ever seen any problems doing it this way over several decades of string changes.

    IT IS A MYTH
     
    96tbird likes this.
  12. FretNoMore

    FretNoMore * Cooking with GAS *

    Jan 25, 2002
    The frozen north
    So what's your explanation for the OP's problem then?
     
  13. jessicabass

    jessicabass

    Dec 22, 2009
    ohio
    Strings are just 3 month old flats.
     
  14. jessicabass

    jessicabass

    Dec 22, 2009
    ohio
    Thank you all for the suggestions. Just found it so weird that when i did a new setup i just couldnt achieve past results.
     
  15. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    Her problem is that the neck needs a simple
    She doesn't have a problem if she knows how to adjust a truss rod ;)

    Her neck has not been damaged
     
    96tbird likes this.
  16. nshuman

    nshuman Supporting Member

    Sep 4, 2012
    Montreal, Qc, Canada
    ccp
    Ok, I don't want to cause a big ruckus. But, let's not suspend the rules of physics or the science of materials because basses are involved. Also, let's not consider only anecdotal evidence.

    First off, nobody on the "replace strings one at a time" crowd mentioned anything about permanent damage. It was just inferred by the detractors of the supposed "myth".

    So, onto science now. The wood(s) on the neck and body of the bass and the torsion rod are not made of some sort of advanced material with amazing elasticity properties. The actual reason for changing strings one at a time is to minimize the difference in forces that are applied on the different components of the bass. The result is that you will have less settling/movement/shifting.

    If you are replacing the strings with very similar ones, which may not be possible at all if the strings are old and have gradually undergone physical change, you may not have to drastically re-setup your bass. i.e. you may not have to work on your neck as much, mess with the bridge as much, etc.

    Do you still need to do a setup either way, yes. Will the nature of the setup be different in either case (in the case where the old and new strings are similar), yes.

    So, you see, if we actually look at the scientific basis for this "myth", we'll discover that it is not a myth at all.

    Now, if someone says that it will greatly damage a bass to remove all the strings, yes, that is a myth, as long as the bass is in good condition. However, again, if you read the previous posts, nobody on the side of what you call a "myth" ever stated that removing all the strings would cause actual irreparable damage.

    Again, I'm really not trying to be disrespectful to anyone here.
     
  17. fourstringdrums

    fourstringdrums Decidedly Indecisive Supporting Member

    Oct 20, 2002
    Massachusetts
    Can you be more specific about where the buzzing is? Chances are, since there was no tension on the neck, it straightened out a bit and putting the strings on isn't pulling enough relief into it. So you probably need to loosen the truss rod a little. But before you do that, take note of the relief it currently has. Fret or put a capo at the first fret. Fret at around the 17th fret (or wherever the neck meets the body) and push down around 9th fret. How much does the string move? Does it move at all? Also if you are getting more buzzing in the first 5 frets or so, you do need more relief.

    Sometimes strings have to settle into the neck even if they were on previously. I just put on a new set today that were a similar gauge to what I had before (the strings were only .1 lighter than what they were before, .84 instead of .85 for instance). My A string had a horrible overtone and open string buzz almost like I got a bad string. After pressing down before the nut and at the saddle to get a good break angle and leaving it on for a bit, it calmed down. You might want to give it a little more time. Sometimes even 24 hours isn't enough time for a neck to stop moving.
     
  18. Hopkins

    Hopkins Supporting Member Commercial User

    Nov 17, 2010
    Houston Tx
    Owner/Builder @Hopkins Guitars
    So my question to you is, how is telling the OP to change one string at a time helping? She was trying the flats on another bass not changing strings. So how exactly would she go about doing that one string at a time?

    I'm not saying its a bad thing to change strings one string at a time, I simply said its unnecessary. I have never put a fresh set of strings on a guitar or bass, changing strings one string at a time or otherwise, and not gotten some minor fret buzz. Either way you are changing the tension applied to the neck. The myth is that you can damage the neck by removing the strings completely, which is simply not true. Just like the myth that you should only adjust your truss rod 1/4 turn and give it a day to settle before adjusting more.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2014
    96tbird likes this.
  19. Ric5

    Ric5 Supporting Member

    Jan 29, 2008
    Colorado
    YES YES YES ...

    I forgot the 1/4 truss rod myth ... good one ...

    It is amazing how stuff gets repeated enough times and people think it is true ...
     
  20. Ric5

    Ric5 Supporting Member

    Jan 29, 2008
    Colorado
    You did nothing wrong to your bass by taking off strings ...

    Why is your neck different?

    Humidity? Did you bump the bridge out of adjustment?

    It really doesn't matter ... If you simply learn to setup your bass then you can enjoy it for years to come.

    Most basses need a setup and adjustment at least twice a year.
     
    96tbird likes this.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.