bad SWR

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by cuckeroo, Aug 22, 2002.

  1. cuckeroo


    Jul 5, 2002
    I've been playing with an SWR workingmans 15 and whatever tweaking and mixing i do it just sounds bad. I play a Fender MIA jazz, and i have the master volume and gain controls at tvelv o'clock.
  2. Golem II

    Golem II

    Jan 4, 2002
    Macon, GA, USA
    describe "bad". I never thought the workingman 15" sounded great, but definitely better than most "budget" combos. Is the sound distorted? Dull? Too loud or too quiet? Do other people who hear it say it sounds bad? I don't know whether you made this post just to express your opinion, or to ask for help.
  3. DigMe


    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    Have you tried the suggested eq settings that you can find at If not then go there, click on products, then click on workingman's series, then click on the workingman's 15 and then suggested settings. If you've tried all those plus your own and you didn't like any of them then maybe the SWR sound just isn't for you...either that or you just got a dud.

    brad cook
  4. bassmonkeee

    bassmonkeee Supporting Member

    Sep 13, 2000
    Decatur, GA
    Dave Siff has one, and I think it sounds great. I've played passive/active/4/5/6 string basses through it, and all sound nice.

    What don't you like about the sound? 15" speakers aren't for everyone. Maybe that has something to do with it?
  5. try dialing in more mids and turning the tweeter off and turning the controls on your bass on full. also make sure the effects blend is all the way down. you're probably just not great at EQing, since mine sounds great.

    maybe you need new strings?
  6. jasonbraatz


    Oct 18, 2000
    Oakland, CA
    have you tried it with everything set completely flat?

    that's my favorite SWR sound. everything flat, enhance at 12:00, tweeter up full.
  7. As the others have said........I would ask to please be more specific on what's the problem. The suggested settings at was also a good suggestion to follow too I'd would take a look at em...........
  8. stop_drop_pop33

    stop_drop_pop33 Guest

    Aug 15, 2002
    under your bed
    When you plug into your bass amp, you need to be aware that your bass' signal needs to be at the right level to make your amp sound its best. If your signal is too weak, you will hear hissing and noise. If your signal is too strong, you will hear distortion and clipping. With some companies' amps, it can be hard to balance your bass signal to your amp's input sensitivity. If there is a limit light on your amp, use that as a gauge. If the limit light stays on when you play, this is overloading your preamp, as the signal is too strong. Fix this by turning your gain dial counterclockwise, until the limit light goes on, but doesnt stay on.