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banjo rolls

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by ga_edwards, Mar 11, 2003.


  1. ga_edwards

    ga_edwards

    Sep 8, 2000
    UK, Essex
    how the hell does Stu Hamm pull off those banjo roll in Country Music?

    The tab says (and what I'm trying to do):

    |---------0-------0-|
    |4h5-5---4h5-5--|
    |--------------------|
    |--------------------|
    s h s p s h s p

    (s=slap h=hammer p=pop)

    This is so damn hard to do as the strings are ajacent. It may be because I'm trying to do it on a 5 string, so a new 4 string maybe on the cards (an OLP stingray perhaps :cool:)

    Is there another easier way? please tell.

    Or do I just have to keep persevering unitl I get it (a case of trying to run before one can walk me thinks....after 10 years of bass playing, I'm only now getting in to the slap style after my bro showed me Stu's solo on the Satch DVD.)
     
  2. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    How fast you going? Work on it s... l... o... w... l... y...

    ;)

    Wulf
     
  3. ga_edwards

    ga_edwards

    Sep 8, 2000
    UK, Essex
    I am going slowly, gradully speeding up until I lose it, then back off. Most little odds and sods I can pick up at a fair pace, but this ones stumped me...and it sounds so fantastic.
     
  4. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    If you keep speeding up until you lose it, it could be said that you're practising getting it wrong! You know the old saying - "That was wrong - do it again" ;)

    How about getting it down at a slower speed and then moving it up a few notches at a time. Eventually, you want to be able to play it just a little bit faster than you need to so that when you pull it out of your bag o' tricks, you can do so without breaking a sweat.

    Wulf
     
  5. After 10 years you're just learning slap? Wow!

    Like Wulf says, start slow to learn the notes and rythym, then ad nauseum at a reasonable pace, keep upping the pace as you get better.

    If you want some other little slap patterns to work on.

    Here a common Wooten pattern

    -------0---------0-h7-------------0----------0-h9
    ---------------------------------------------------
    -0-h5--------0-------------0-h7---------0------
    ----------------------------------------------------
    s h p s p h s h p s p h

    He calls it "open hammer pluck"- it's just triplets using open strings, hammer-ons with slapping. A really fast pattern, a favorite pattern of mine to doodle with.
     
  6. ga_edwards

    ga_edwards

    Sep 8, 2000
    UK, Essex
    Cheers for the ideas...

    Yes it may seem strange that I'm learning to slap after 10 years. My style of playing is in the Blues/Rock/Hard Rock vien, and most opther music before the 80's slap boom like Cream, Queen etc. Good solid, but oft technical finger style playing. I've never needed to slap playing this stuff, so I never learnt. Foolishly I put slap in the party piece, showing off bracket, not realising it's true potential in rock music. I've always been of the school feeling over speed. Peter Green could put more feeling and emotion into one note than Malmsteen could in 50.
    I'm now getting into funk and disco lines, and it's coming up a bit, RHCP's flea's stuff is creeping into the average cover bands reportoire. And like I said about Stu Hamm. I've always been aware of him, and I've loved Satch and Via for years, but never heard how they played stuff live with just a 4 piece band, until I watched the Stch DVD, and saw Stu's 2 hand tapping technique to fill in the arppegio's and his amazing solo frenzy (which is really the afore mentioned showing off piece, but it's damn good). I'm also now involved in a new project with a guy who is destined to be the new Satch, so learning thes techniques is going to be benecfial, esp as we plan to throw in the odd cover. My bass solo's (If I'm required to do one)tend to be more chord based than right hand technique based, so sticking in a few bars of Country Music might spice things up a bit.
     
  7. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    You were right!! ;)


    PS - from the thread title I thought you were talking about punch cards that you put into some kind of mechanical "player-banjo"!! :D