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BASS CHORDS

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by gareth, Jul 6, 2003.


  1. gareth

    gareth

    Jun 9, 2002
    UK
    I've never used bass chords much and wonder what I'm missing.

    What are the most popular chords - for instance are they fourths used playing the top two strings together or 10th's (minor and major).

    What am I missing

    Any suggestions
     
  2. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    You are missing a note, unless you can somehow manage to get three simultaneous notes from those two strings.
     
  3. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    please let's not get into that again... :rolleyes:

    5ths, due to the low range of the bass are good anywhere on the neck. Thirds are great higher up, as are tritones (especially when you're playing the 3rd and 7th of a dom7 chord). Experiment!
     
  4. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Chords on the bass are the same as chords on any other polyphonic instrument...They just need to be configured to fit the particular range and tuning scheme of the bass. Two-note chords are called diads. Some of these, like 3rds and 6ths, can be used to imply three-note chords (also called triads), since the fifth of a major or minor triad is not really necessary to define its function.
     
  5. i thought a two note chord a double stop, and a 3 note chord a triple stop. iam pretty sure about the double stop.
     
  6. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    Why don't you ask him whether he'd rather have facts or misinformation?
     
  7. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    Two notes is a double stop. There is no such thing as a two-note chord. There is not enough information in two notes to define a chord. A chord may be implied with two notes, which is not quite the same thing as an actual chord.
     
  8. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification

    Since we're being nitpicky, how do you play a double stop on a piano? Diad is the correct term, but it is common to use the term chord when talking about 2 notes played at the same time.
     
  9. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    Well, if you really want to get nic-picky, if he had wanted to know about a piano, he would have gone to talkpiano.
    What is common and what is correct can be two different things, no? Could it be common because people like you think that what is correct is unimportant?
    For want of a nail...
     
  10. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Sheesh, of everything said here the only thing I want to emphasize is Experiment
     
  11. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification

    People like me? Full time, working and educated professionals?

    Could be, but face it - your comment was for the most part - a "look at me, I know about music" comment. Functionally irrelevant, since it was quite easy to figure out what the original poster wanted.

    And, not to rain on your parade, there is debate on this very subject in the most educated circles of musicians. Just because you can find your definition of a chord doesn't mean I can't find mine. I'm not going to argue this further (as I asked in the begining), but if you want to talk music theory, I'd be glad to in another venue. Just be careful what you wish for.
     
  12. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    Sorry to have to enlighten you, you being a full time, working and educated professional and all, but that is not my definition of a chord; it is the definition of a chord, look it up. Everything from Webster's to my college music-textbook defines a chord has having three notes.
    If you believe that my comment was a "look at me, I know about music" comment, okay, but the fact is, I tried to steer him towards facts and you tried to, and are still trying to trivalize it.
    As helpful as you are on this board (sincerely), I can't understand why you would want the many readers to go away with the wrong impression that two notes can define a chord. If your contention is that two notes can define a chord, then produce one, and I will show you why it is not.
    A lot of these people look up to you and "Well, Pacman told me, it must be true". Is that what you really want?
    BTW, I am full time, working, and educated professional too.
     
  13. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    diad= 2 notes played simaltaneously, for all practical application, why not call it a chord? It's a trite and meaningless point to argue, if you really care that much, go marry a dictionary, I personally think that getting hung up over words like this, is such a waste of time.

    On top of that, a diad, could imply a chord, it doesn't need to be three notes in this sense, becuase the third(or ....fifth..seventh etc.) can be implied.

    But overall, arguing over the matter just wastes time, and accomplishes nothing.
     
  14. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    I said I wouldn't, but I will anyway:

    From Virginia Tech:
    From the Austin Symphony site:
    Please note the term usually

    From the all music guide (some discussion on inversions trimmed):
    I could go on, but really what's the point? Please note, I never said that a chord could be defined (as you intimated) by two notes. That is to say there's a difference between "the definition of chord" and "x chord can be defined by a given number of notes". The original poster wanted to discuss playing more than one note at a time on his bass - very correctly referred to as playing chords.

    By the way, what does Webster's say about diad? Because the only definitions mine came up with were medical in nature.
     
  15. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    Because it is not a chord.
    If I were going to marry a book, I think I would go for porn.
    Chris and I both pointed that out earlier; however if it was a chord, you really wouldn't have to "imply" anything, would you. You would simply say (or play) that it is a chord.
    So, why are you arguing about it?
     
  16. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    For every one of those references you can dig up, I can dig up 100 that say a chord is at least three notes. Tell me, what chord is made from a C and a G note? You can't tell me without at least one more note, can you.

    No, you intimated it.
    Diad is not in my Webster's at all. But if it was, the definition wouldn't be a chord, which is at least three notes.

    edit: to correct spelling, I'm such a stickler for what is correct.
     
  17. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    Melnibone
    I see that you are following you own advice. Good for you.
     
  18. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Congratulations Turock you are the first person I've ever put on my ignore list. good bye.
     
  19. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    I'll type slowly, maybe you'll get it this time.

    There's a difference between saying "a chord is two or more notes" and saying "these two notes make up an X demolished chord". You may have to read the previous statement more than once to get it, but I've got faith in you, man.

    By the way, where did you study music?