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BASS CUT OUT AT LAST GIG -=HELP=-

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by phoenixgraves, Aug 20, 2012.


  1. phoenixgraves

    phoenixgraves

    Apr 6, 2011
    I played a gig over the weekend and my bass cut out on the last song... the money shot song, the last song that melts your face and leaves you begging for more.

    This has happened to me before and I was told it was the input on my bass. But I got that remade and it is solid.

    I am running:

    Peavey Mark VI bass head
    Laney 1x15 and 2x10 cab
    Ibanez EDA 905 (5 string, active)
    and a pedalboard with a slew of pedals, all powered and no issues there

    It is like my head gets too maxed out/hot and then shuts down. I even tried plugging direct in with no luck. Its not the bass, its not the cables, it MUST be the head. I have read online that this head is supposed to be one of the greats yet this keeps happening. I may be doing it wrong but it seems like I should be able to set my EQ and blast as loud as I need to.

    This has ONLY happened when we play a gig and I dont mic my cab. Meaning that it only happens when I need to turn it up for a live show with no mics.

    Please help! I am pissed off enough to get a different cab. It even distorts sometimes when I crank it. This setup should be great, and its just pissing me off!!!

    HELP! :crying:
     
  2. Bass Mentor

    Bass Mentor

    Apr 30, 2012
    Nashville Tennessee
    endorsing artist: Lava Cable, E&O Mari, Rupert Neve Designs
    from what you are posting, it sounds as if the '' thermal limiting'' that is built in the head is kicking in after the amp hits a certain temp--- i suspect this especially since this happens on the last song after your amp has had a workout...
    try using an external fan directed to the head to keep it cool-- also if possible turn down and let the monitors and house system do the work--- check to see if you are running the most beneficial impedance match up between head and cab......you could also ( again, if possible) roll a little bass off of your eq to provide another factor to reduce overheating and the amp has more headroom to breathe a little....

    Sorry to hear of your troubles, I've had them myself over the years and it is No Fun at all:-(
    Hope this helps......also if possible get your amp head checked out.......from your last sentence it would appear you may need a more powerful rig.....last resort of course 'cause you are shelling out some serious bucks...

    Steve
     
  3. phoenixgraves

    phoenixgraves

    Apr 6, 2011
    thanks man, the amp does have a fan inside of it. I am wondering if I am just pluggin it in wrong. The input has a LOW GAIN and HIGH GAIN input into the cab. I plug into the LOW GAIN. On the back of the cab I plug the head into the top one called MINIMUM AMPLIFIER LOAD 2 OHMS, is that wrong? I am totally down to buy a new head if this one isnt powerful enough for me. Anything to never have this happen again.
     
  4. Dave W

    Dave W Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2007
    White Plains
    A couple of things. It definitely sounds like the amp is shutting down after getting too hot. That could be from a few things. He's saying to use an external fan blowing on it as well...like something you'd have in your house. The current fan might be getting a little tired and just not keeping up with the heat, the intake/exhaust could be dirty not allowing enough airflow, etc.

    When you speak of High Gain and Low Gain you're talking about the bass input on the head, right? If so, I'd use the high gain but that's dependent on the bass and how hot of a signal it puts out. I run some seriously hot basses and always use the Hot/Passive input.

    What are the ohm ratings of your cabs? They should say it right on the back. If you're running two 4 ohm cabs, you're getting the full 300w into the cabs. If you're running two 8 ohm cabs, you're getting 210w into the cabs. Depending on how loud your band is, 210w may not be enough pushing through your current speakers. Also, if you're running it at 2 ohms, it's probably running hotter anyways.

    If you need more volume, I'd be looking at different cabs first. Especially if you like the sound of the amp. The 210/115 pairing you've got isn't bad, but it's not ideal either. If you want absolute volume, something with more speaker surface area would be best. A 610, 810, or two 410's for example.
     
  5. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    Have you verified the fan in the amp is indeed working?
     
  6. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    If it is working, clean out the amp. Dust and dirt, etc. on parts inhibits good cooling and dirt on the leading edges of the fan blades makes it not be able to move as much air as it should.

    Check the gain settings all the way throgh your pedal board. You might be running the input too hot, making the amp try to produce more power than it can.
     
  7. phoenixgraves

    phoenixgraves

    Apr 6, 2011
    I have NOT confirmed that the fan is working. Thanks, I didnt even think about that. When I talk about the High and Low gain inputs, it is the amp that has these two input options. Which is funny because I realized I had been using the High Gain input on the amp and recently switched to the Low. Sounds like I need to go back and adjust accordingly.

    There are two inputs on the back of the head and the cab. I plug it into the top one on the amp, and the left one on the cab. I do not know what I am running as far as ohms. I will look tonight at what it says.
     
  8. Dave W

    Dave W Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2007
    White Plains
    Also...what are the EQ settings, master volume, and input settings?
     
  9. BassmanPaul

    BassmanPaul Gold Supporting Member

    Aug 25, 2007
    Toronto Ontario Canada
    I had a Peavey Mark something head that had a problem with cutting out. Opening the amp up revealed that the cooling system was almost totally clogged with crud. A good clean out with a vacuum, crevice tool, and a paint brush cured the problem.
     
  10. pgolliher

    pgolliher

    Apr 27, 2010
    Santa Cruz, CA
    In addition to the good advice above, I would look into getting an external DI box, like a Sansamp or tone hammer. If you amp does cut out during a song, you will still have a feed to the board and the sound guy can turn you up in the mains to compensate for your dead amp.
     
  11. phoenixgraves

    phoenixgraves

    Apr 6, 2011
    my EQ is setup kinda of like a swervy snake. Without a picture or something it would be hard to describe. My PRE is about at a 2 (although that knob broke off, but it sure isnt up very high at all), my POST is about a 3 or 4. The shelving is always a tricky one. I like the deep bass sound but also like the crunch of the mids and highs. So my LOW SHELVING is always at about -3 or -6 (this due to horrible distorting of the speakers) and my HIGH SHELVING is at about +3. I have the on board compression ON and sometimes the little light comes on telling me (I think) that it is maxing out(?).

    I will FOR SURE check the innards and see if it is all gummed up. Now that I think about it, I am sure that this might be the problem. I will check tonight. Thanks guys, this is a big help. Let me know about the settings and stuff too tho.
     
  12. Bass Mentor

    Bass Mentor

    Apr 30, 2012
    Nashville Tennessee
    endorsing artist: Lava Cable, E&O Mari, Rupert Neve Designs
    Yes, the DI has most certainly saved me in the past!


    Also, great advice on getting all of the dust off of the innards of the amp......it is amazing how bad it becomes in s very short time
     
  13. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    Some companoes label them differently but one of your inputs, either Low or High, will be a padded input. It knocks the signal down some so you have more freedom of movement in the volume and gain knobs before clipping. It for using with hot input signals, like an active bass with a strong pre, or gainy pedals. You can figure out which is which by setting up your bass and amp volumew to play, then without changing any volume settings, try the other input. Whichever is quieter is the padded one.

    The speaker outs on the amp and inputs on the cab should be all wired in parallel. Means it doesn't matter which you plug into, it all comes out the same.

    Re: your pedals. If you're using one as a sort of lead/volume boost or something, that's OK but in general, the effected sound should be the same volume as it is with the pedal off. If you're getting louder and louder every time you turn on another pedal, you're boosting the signal before it even gets to the amp. If you need to do that to achieve some certain tone, use the padded input on the amp.

    I don't know if your amps fan is made to run all the time, or if it's on a thermostat that tells it to turn on when the amp reaches a certain temperature. If it doesn't come on when you turn the amp on, turn it up and play for a while to get the amp warmed up like it would run at a gig. If the fan still doesn't come on, you have either a bad fan or bad thermostat/thermistor.

    And yes, make sure everything is clean in there. Those Peaveys are known for being able to run at 2ohms all night long. I would suspect a cooling problem.
     
  14. +1

    this should be a routine up keep item for anyone with electronics that are fan cooled. I find taking my amps out and using the air compressor to blow the dust out works pretty good.
     
  15. Rickengeezer

    Rickengeezer

    Feb 25, 2005
    Central Texas
    Endorsing Artist: Steve Clayton Accessories
    Also, a little more obvious perhaps--check the speaker cable from your amp to your first cabinet. When you say the amp "shuts down", do you mean it actually powers off, or that it is still powered on but no sound out of it?

    Just a thought on the speaker cable as I had my amp cut out first set Sat. night--it was the patch cable from my preamp to my amp.
     
  16. will33

    will33

    May 22, 2006
    austin,tx
    The flashing light is probably the DDT circuit. It will engage and start to limit the signal some as the amp nears full output. If it's flashing now and then that's fine. It means you're using the potential of the amp but not overdoing anything.

    I don't see anything in your eq settings that would be a problem.

    Check your speakers and make sure they are all working good. A blown driver would make the farty sounds and could cause your impedance to drop lower than you think it is.
     
  17. phoenixgraves

    phoenixgraves

    Apr 6, 2011
    Ok, so I powered up the other night. The fan is dirty but it is running strong. My friend tried to explain the OHMs to me and I gotta be honest; its a bit confusing. If you find a pic of the back of the Peavey, there are two outputs. I have been using the top one. He says I have been overworking my amp because the speakers cant handle 2 ohms? I dont know... I have an important gig this weekend and I am stressing about my amp cutting out on me again.

    aaaagh!
     
  18. georgestrings

    georgestrings Banned

    Nov 5, 2005
    My guess would be that you need more speakers to make the kind of volume you're trying to play at... I used a Mark VI for a couple of years, in a loud band - and never had any troubles with it... In fact, the guy that ended up with it is still using it... I'd suggest getting rid of the 115 and pairing up your 210 with a 410, or getting rid of both and getting either a 610 or an 810... An ideal cab setup for your situaion would be an 8 ohm 210 and a 4 ohm 410, or a 4 ohm 610...


    - georgestrings
     
  19. phoenixgraves

    phoenixgraves

    Apr 6, 2011
    how do I tell what my cab is rated at (ie. 4 ohm, 8 ohm, etc)?
     
  20. phoenixgraves

    phoenixgraves

    Apr 6, 2011
    I have a 2x10, 1x15 cab... so adding another cab will help?
     

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