Bass Guitar Pedal Board Setup

Discussion in 'Effects [BG]' started by Wlbravo, Jan 22, 2014.


  1. Wlbravo

    Wlbravo

    Jan 22, 2014
    Manvel, TX
    Hey Guys,
    I am trying to put together a bass guitar pedal board but I don't know what pedals to put on it. I play Country, Funk, Rock, Christian, and Blues songs and I need a setup that will support all of the above. Anyone got any suggestions or setups of their own they can share? Post a picture if it's a setup or if it's just advise anything works!

    Thanks guys!
     
  2. EricssonB

    EricssonB Supporting Member

    Apr 5, 2011
    CoSpgs, CO.
    [​IMG]

    EDIT: I'd start out with getting the bass "tone" that you want, probably with a bitchen' preamp, then add effects to taste. There are all sorts of preamps, and I'm sure folks will chime in with what they recommend.
     
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  4. Wlbravo

    Wlbravo

    Jan 22, 2014
    Manvel, TX
    I am not looking for a drum pedal but thanks for the info I can defiantly look into it for my drum set!
     
  5. eveilleu

    eveilleu

    Oct 30, 2013
    Montreal, Qc
  6. Dave W

    Dave W Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2007
    White Plains
    May I ask an obvious question? Why do you want a board if you don't know what you want? Are there certain sounds that you wasn't but can't get with your current gear?

    I mean that in the nicest way, I just hate to see people waste money on stuff because they think they "need" it. There are thousands of pedals out there. Narrowing down what you're looking for will help greatly with suggestions, otherwise it's just going to be everyone recommending what they personally like.
     
  7. Hello and welcome to TB.

    Maybe start simple with just a tuner, compressor, overdrive/distortion, preamp and chorus/flanger.
     
  8. wmheilma

    wmheilma

    Jan 5, 2010
    Yes. Start simple. Also be very picky. IMHO There really aren't any cheap pedals that do well for bass.

    Also, when you turn them off they need to not screw up your tone. So look for true bipass as an important feature. I picked up a Loooper pedal to get the digital ones out of the way when not in use.
     
  9. Wlbravo

    Wlbravo

    Jan 22, 2014
    Manvel, TX
    I want the pedal board to get more of a tone without having to haul my amp everywhere. I want to have a bright and full tone and I can put a little bit of distortion for blues songs and I am just trying to get a idea of what type of pedals I would need like a compression pedal, a distortion, a bass driver, Etc
     
  10. Mosfed

    Mosfed Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Apr 21, 2013
    Mont Blanc
    Partner - CCP Pedals
    My current pedal board consists of (in this order after some help here from folks):

    - Octave divider (either a Boss OC-3 (thinking about getting another OC-2) or a BYOC of the Mutron Octave divider
    - Fuzz / distortion / boost (these days more often a Keeley Fuzz Head - but also use a AnalogMan Peppermint Fuzz sometimes)
    - Envelope Filter (either a Moog MF-101 or a Mutron III)
    - Phase (MXR reissue Phase 90 script or a Mutron Phaser II)
    - Delay (EHX Memory Boy - but I will buy the mini-Moog Analog Delay when it comes out)

    I use the Octaver to get synth like / organ like tones and for variety. The Fuzz/boost/distortion for songs like Manic Depression. The Envelope Filter for those Bootsy Collins space wah sounds or when we are playing any Stevie. The Phase works well all around - works well for reggae or anywhere where some extra texture is helpful. The delay is purely because in my current band we often take things out and get pretty free - the delay produces some just jaw dropping effects and rhythms.

    To be honest, until this band I never needed more than a filter and a phase. But I love having the possibility of switching up my tone.

    For reference, I use mainly Fender basses and a 1972 Ampeg SVT.
     
  11. Dave W

    Dave W Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2007
    White Plains
    You'd still need some sort of amplification. What would you be using? Going direct to the PA?
     
  12. Wlbravo

    Wlbravo

    Jan 22, 2014
    Manvel, TX
    Yes I'd be going through a PA
     
  13. In your situation, this is what I would use (not necessarily in this order):
    Compressor (I use the MXR Bass Compressor. Highly recommend it.)
    Overdrive (Fulltone OCD is my weapon of choice)
    Fuzz (Bass Big Muff. I own a Swollen Pickle, but it's a bit much for me nowadays.)
    Octave (Aguilar Octamizer is my favorite.)
    Filter Envelope (There are too many cool/unique sounding ones to name.)
    Preamp (Sansamp Bass Driver DI is super versatile and sounds amazing, IMO.)
    DI (see above)
     
  14. jimmybc91

    jimmybc91

    Oct 8, 2013
    Los Angeles
    I would start with a good preamp pedal (tech 21 makes awesome stuff). Personally I really like the EBS Valvedrive (my current set-up). Gets me that tubey sound and with the vintage channel I can get a hair of dirt on top.

    My "clean" chain (on a nano pedalboard):

    SFX Microthumpinator (cleans up my signal)
    Polytune Noir
    Markbass Mini Booster (great quick eq for slapping tones)
    Empress Compressor (one of the most transparent compressors for me)
    EBS Valvedrive (use as a preamp, vintage mode for the bluesy old school vibe)

    That's my set-up and I find it verstaile for what I use it for ("christian", blues, jazz, alternative).

    Definitly start with a preamp, amp emulator if you are planning to just go direct. Sansamp BDDI is a good place to start IMO.
     
  15. Wlbravo

    Wlbravo

    Jan 22, 2014
    Manvel, TX
    That sounds pretty cool and the pedals aren't that expensive and they give good tone thank you!
     
  16. OP: If you're not in a real big hurry, MXR will be manufacturing their new M81 Bass Preamp/DI later this year - I'm hoping to replace my BDDI with one.
     
  17. No problem :) trust me, i've spent enough time trying to find good pedals on a budget to know what you're feeling XD
     
  18. ArtechnikA

    ArtechnikA I endorsed a check once... Gold Supporting Member

    Feb 24, 2013
    SEPA
    Well, as long as you're defiant...
     
  19. Geist

    Geist

    Aug 31, 2007
    If your looking for a bluesy overdrive,I find the Marshall Guv'nor is a fantastic and way under hyped OD for bass. It's no longer in production, but a used one can be grabbed for about $50. The 4 band EQ can keep the pedal from loosing any bass and it gives a really nice grit tone. I sometimes wish it had a blend control, but after getting mine for under $50 I've got no complaints

    I really like having a chorus sound - there are many great pedals at great price ranges for that, I've settled on the TC Electronic Corona, but also I can say that many of the EHX products (SEM, clone theory, neo small clone) are also great. Don't have experience with others. I can see a chorus being very useful in a worship setting or to subtly spice up long or open passages.

    If your looking at a wah pedal I would grab a Weeping Demon as it's a fantastic pedal, costs $100 new, and can do a plethora of sounds. I since sold mine (to a violin player no less - talk about versatility) to grab a Gig-FX Sub-Wah because it is better for the sound I want (soooooo much bass), but the Demon is able to get everything from a good funky sound to that Cliff Burton screech. No other wah is nearly as versatile.
     
  20. Just throwing in my two cents... I'm not a pro but some one might gain from my experience or maybe send forth some constructive criticism...

    I put together a modest bass pedalboard one piece at a time, with the aim of improving tone/personal sound without special effects. It don't look pretty, but it works... Also, to easily control some practical things and keep it all in one place. It's still experimental, as the a/c bar is cluttered because I wanted to ensure 18 volts for head room instead of using batteries. The board was the top of an old end table, now covered in velcro.

    I found the greatest improvement in tone from the Line Driver. I strongly advise a buffer for any musician who is outputting electrical signals. The compressor and Sonic Stomp add their magic best when tuned slightly into the mix - less seems to be more.

    Through the years I only used the amp for tone and volume, but the board makes signal control easy and creates superb tone and bass presence within the band. It's also been an enjoyable learning experience.

    The pedals are connected as follows:

    1. Fulltone Clyde Wah Pedal
    ---------------------------
    Used mostly for guitar, but fun on bass, too. Also, can be left on to achieve a treble boost without lows when wanted. It had to be placed first in line.

    2. MXR Boost/Line Driver
    ------------------------
    Makes up for signal loss in the lead cords to achieve a clean, sparkling, lively tone or a quick volume boost when needed. Probably the most essential pedal, it sets the base line for everything else.

    3. Markbass Bass Compressore
    ----------------------------
    Tightens up the sound and gets a more focused tone for plectrum or pizzicato. It's tube also adds warmth to the tone and a slight compression achieves a studio quality bass tone.

    4. Ernie Ball Volume Pedal
    --------------------------
    Temporarily quietens the room when tuning, talking, doing warm-ups or working out an idea; manages song fade-ins and fade-outs; achieves an interesting string-bowed effect; makes quick sound level adjustments while playing; adds volume for solos/parts and reduces volume for ensemble playing; controls a sustained bass note at the end of a song.

    5. BBE Sonic Stomp
    ------------------
    Great for guitar or bass as it adds presence, sparkle and some EQ boosting. As it matches frequencies to the speakers, it's placed at the end of the line, just before the amp.

    6. Boss RC-2 Loop Station
    -------------------------
    Creative for home use to make quick backing tracks for practice or to compose material.

    7. Boss TU-80 Tuner/Metronome
    -----------------------------
    For tuning, practicing rhythms/timing and to determine BPM of a tune to avoid performing it too fast/slow.
     
  21. danster

    danster Supporting Member

    Jul 13, 2007
    Connecticut, USA
    I play Motown, classic pop and Contemporary Christian.
    I have a pedal train jr. and have been using this setup for awhile -
    Boss TU-2 tuner -> Boss OC-2 Octaver -> Boss CEB Bass Chorus -> MXR M80 Bass DI.
    I will be adding a compressor between the tuner and the Octaver -either a Keeley Bassist or a MXR M87.
    At church we do in ear monitoring -no amps.
    The M80 DI works well.