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Bass Method Books for University Study...any other teachers out there?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Chris Fitzgerald, Aug 26, 2001.


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  1. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    I've been teaching private students for the past 15 years (Bass and Piano), but this year a new wrinkle has been thrown in...I've been asked to take a few BG students at Bellarmine University, where I also teach classes in Orchestration and Jazz Harmony. My question is about preferred bass method books.

    In my private teaching, I use my own method, which is slightly different for each student, and I will continue to do that in the collegiate situation... BUT, I am also required to turn in a syllabus with information on the method book(s) used, and I am at a loss at the moment as to what method book to choose for this purpose. Basically, I'm looking for something that will provide a solid foundation in reading and physical technique. I could use a DB method book for this, but would rather use a BG method if there is an acceptable one out there.

    Any/all serious suggestions welcome.

    Thanks,
    Chris
     
  2. Check ou the Evolving Bassist by Rufus Reid. "A comprehensive method in developing a total musival Concept for the aspiring jazz bass player." It's for DB but i use it for BG just the same.
     
  3. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
  4. Chris A

    Chris A Chemo sucks!

    Feb 25, 2000
    Manchester NH
    This is what I studied out of for my collegiate lessons. Well, that and the Simandl.

    Chris A.:rolleyes:
     
  5. Chris, _The Evolving Bassist_ and Simandl's 30 Etudes are what I usually use with bass guitar students.
     
  6. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Thanks for the replies everyone. I think I'll go with a mixture of Simandl, Rabbath, and Reid. I'd like to add some J.S. Bach 2 part invention transcriptions, but every time I do a search for them, all I come up with is a version that is put out with a mixture if Standard Notation and TABZ, authored by JOSQUIN DES PRESLEY. I find both the TABZ part and the cutesy nickname too annoying to consider. Does anyone know of any STANDARD NOTATION ONLY editions of the 2 part inventions? When I practice them myself, I always just read from the piano score, but this won't work for my students.

    Thanks in advance.

    Chris
     
  7. Christopher

    Christopher

    Apr 28, 2000
    New York, NY
    I have the Josquin Des Pres transcriptions of Bach's Cello Suites. It's good, basic reading material if you ignore the tablature (the man has an extremely odd aversion to open strings).

    I'd recommend the Appleman "EB Rhythms" book, if only because it presents students with some inkling of the rhythmic hijinks that they'll be getting themselves into if they ever venture outside of jazz and 8th note rawk. The book starts off with basic walking lines and gets progressively more complex, with syncopated rests, odd time signatures, etc. A lot of the lines are notated in both a "fast" time signature with large note values, and a corresponding "slow" time signature with the note values halved. They sound the same, but the former are much less intimidating to read. A nice touch.
     
  8. Blackbird

    Blackbird Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Mar 18, 2000
    California
    The electric bass instructor in my university uses a book called "Basic electric bass" for reading and playing patterns and grooves. It contains various patterns that are finally combined into an etude at the end of each section. It's not bad.

    Authors: James Progris w/ Lucas Drew, editor.
     
  9. Although I cannot remember any specific titles, I think the books by Ed Freidland would be well worth checking out.
     
  10. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    I think Gary Willis' <b>Fingerboard Harmony</b> is a good book too.
     
  11. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    When I started trying to play Jazz, I found Ed Friedland's "Jazz Bass" to be the most helpful (most practical) - it has a picture of a Carvin 5-string BG on the front.

    No tab and lots of notated examples as well as a CD to play along with.

    I have since leant it to other struggling electric bass players who have come along to Jazz workshops I attend.
     
  12. Garry Goodman

    Garry Goodman

    Feb 26, 2003
    I am releasing a Bach two part inventions for bass guitar book soon.I have taken arrangements i worked out for the limitations of the 4 1/2 octave 7 string bass and for the 9 string. The book will include exact fingerings and practice methods. To view an excerpt of Bach two part invention #1 on 9 string in quicktime movie format (3mb) send me your email address and I'll send you the 30 second excerpt. It is a great way to develope two hand independence.









    QUOTE]Originally posted by Chris Fitzgerald
    Thanks for the replies everyone. I think I'll go with a mixture of Simandl, Rabbath, and Reid. I'd like to add some J.S. Bach 2 part invention transcriptions, but every time I do a search for them, all I come up with is a version that is put out with a mixture if Standard Notation and TABZ, authored by JOSQUIN DES PRESLEY. I find both the TABZ part and the cutesy nickname too annoying to consider. Does anyone know of any STANDARD NOTATION ONLY editions of the 2 part inventions? When I practice them myself, I always just read from the piano score, but this won't work for my students.

    Thanks in advance.

    Chris
    [/QUOTE]
     
  13. Andrew Jones

    Andrew Jones Banned

    Feb 28, 2001
    Northampton Mass
    These are the books I consider the best out there for electric.



    Technique;

    1) Willis's Fingerboard harmony is great a probally appraochable for a short turm..

    2)Joe debartlilo(something like that)serious electric bass is a overly complete and longturm version.

    3)Anthony Vittis Book are all the best for there individual topics (Slap,Finger funk)

    Essensial Musical conseps;

    1)Ed friedland walking bass lines is very well presented.

    2)(wilis's book could strattle the line over here one fo the reason its so great)

    Reading;


    1) For getting a grasp on 16th nots reading Vitti's reading funk rhythms cant be beat(hard!)


    2) a normal cello version of the bach etudes.

    3) Stinnets Paul chambers transcriptions then the Omni Book

    4)The new berklee bass reading book.


    If I was to pick the esensials


    Edfriedland wlking bass

    Willis Fingbaord harmony

    berklee faculty reading


    AJ
     
  14. ole Jason

    ole Jason Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    Louisville, KY
  15. Garry Goodman

    Garry Goodman

    Feb 26, 2003
    Transcriptions are great .Knowing how to play them is where the work is. I have transcribed Bach two part inventions and put together a method for bass players to play them so they sound close to a piano performance. I haven't seen anyone else offering this material. I'll email a preview quicktime movie,and take advance orders on the method from those who are interested in true two handed independence on bass guitar.
     
  16. ole Jason

    ole Jason Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    Louisville, KY
    Most of them work fine on extended range basses without having to change anything too much. The fingerings can be a bit tricky though. But yes, you need to keep in mind the proper phrasing that Bach had in mind as they were written for harpsichord. I don't think that Chris was planning on teaching them as tapping exercises though. Generally they're taught as duets on string instruments.
     
  17. Garry Goodman

    Garry Goodman

    Feb 26, 2003
    so the fingerings can be a bit tricy.... will you send me a video or quicktime movie of you playing Bach two part invention #1 with your fingering ? I'll send you a video of me playing the same piece. You sound like you have them down ,so maybe you could help me improve on my fingering concept..
     
  18. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    meow!




    :rolleyes: Geez, Gary, lighten up!
     
  19. ole Jason

    ole Jason Supporting Member

    Apr 3, 2003
    Louisville, KY
    Actually, I'm working on #4. When/if I work on #1 I will be glad to send you a transcription with my fingerings. I'm not capable of recording videos on the computer, sorry. My email is jason_sturgill9@eku.edu if you'd like to send me the video.

    p.s. let's keep the condescending attitude to a minimum from now on sweety :)
     
  20. Garry Goodman

    Garry Goodman

    Feb 26, 2003
    I put in a few years developing two hand independence on a single fretboard tuned in fourths. I take the work seriously.

    There is no condecending "tone" to my last post. To say fingering Bach two and three part inventions is a bit tricky is an understatement. .To clarify to anyone reading this , I am talking about performing these pieces as a pianist does.

    I worked out fingerings for these pieces and there are some comprimises when you are restricted to 7 strings. Even with 9 strings there are times when you end up with both hands on the same string.

    If you have already played these pieces ,I would like to see what you are doing. You can most likely make some suggestions . If that is having a condecending attitude ,i would only be directed to someone who says they can do something ,but can't. I have been accused of that a number of times on Talk Bass. I think some of you use the term "Troll " Unfortunately for them, I can do what i say I can do. If you play two part inventions well,then I do apologize if I come across as condecending.

    I made a quicktime movie and to keep just one minute looking and sounding like a video recording require 17 megs (9 compressed). I had email difficulties and can only send 3 megs. I sent you a 30 second excerpt.The audio is intact, but the visual drops frames.

    I am releasing a book and DVD on my way of approaching Bach two part inventions. It was my hopes to find other bassists doing this to get some feedback. Your post indicated you "had them down" already. I did a search for Bach,and this thread came up.
     



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