Dismiss Notice

Psst... Ready to join TalkBass and start posting, make new friends, sell your gear, and more?  Register your free account in 30 seconds.

Bass setup help Nedded

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by Captain Freedom, Jun 17, 2003.


  1. Hello

    I'm pretty good with set up's..But my new ESP Eclipse hollowbody is baffling me.

    When i'm pluged into my tuner, i hit the open "E", tune it !
    Then i play the 12th fret "E" and it's way flat.
    But if i do the 12th fret harmonic (for intonation) it's perfect?

    Now i've tried my trus rod & saddle adjustments but no go !!

    All the strings do this, And this doesn't happen with any of my solid body basses....Is this a hollow body thing.

    When i play in the upper register with my band, i'm suddenly out of tune...Now what do i do?

    Thanks
    :bassist: :bawl: :bassist:
     
  2. pkr2

    pkr2

    Apr 28, 2000
    coastal N.C.
    Do a search using the keyword "intonation".

    The string(s) playing length needs adjusting. The strings need to be made shorter by adjusting the bridge saddles.

    The fact that the harmonic is in tune is normal even if the intonation is off.

    Pkr2
     
  3. Ben Mishler

    Ben Mishler

    Jan 22, 2003
    San Jose
    The best way for setting inotation is to make sure the open string is tuned, then make sure that the 12th fret is in tune too. If it is not, then your inotation is off. You should just adjust the bridge until the 12th is in tune with the open string.

    The harmonics really are not effected by the inotation at all.
     
  4. Ive noticed on my washburn that all is in tune except at the 12th when its say slightly sharp. No matter how far i adjust the saddles both ways this never changes the intonation. It doesnt really bother me as its not too bad. Odd though.

    :D:D

    Merls
     
  5. Ben, the last part of your post is the correct part. A tuned open string will always have a tuned 12th fret harmonic like Pkr2 said. It's the fretted note at the 12th fret that you can adjust to match the harmonic - not the other way around. A fretted note that is sharp to the harmonic needs to have the string's vibrating portion lengthened while the opposite is true of a fretted note that is flat to the harmonic.