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bass solos

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by haleada, Aug 12, 2001.


  1. haleada

    haleada

    Jan 13, 2001
    hey all fellow bassists,

    i was looking for bass solos that sound hard but are not and will impress people?

    can you help out.

    thanks

    please no slap bass solos though i can't slap
     
  2. The little solo in Aeroplane is pretty cool, and simple to boot. The last note is popped though, if I remember correctly, but you could just play it regularly.

    If you can play fast, the solo in Maxwell Murder by Rancid is cool sounding and not too hard.
     
  3. 6-stringjazz

    6-stringjazz

    Jun 1, 2001
    Abq NM
    Why don't you take the time you are going to spend on learning somebody elses "easy solo" and learn how to improvise yourself. you can't be a wuss all your life!!
     
  4. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    amen. go for it, haleada, try to create something on your own, give it a shot, and keep working at it until you get something. THEN you'll be a better bass player, too.

    learn the theory and process that your favorite bass players each go utilize to construct their solos - understand what's going on with them, and then you can apply that knowledge for yourself.
     
  5. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Check out some Ritchie Blackmore (and transcript his solos to bass). ┬┤Stealing licks from good guitar players is a great way of building up a basic vocabuary for soloing and improvising (since good bass solos are kinda...rare).

    /lovebown
     
  6. Christopher

    Christopher

    Apr 28, 2000
    New York, NY
    Try "Portrait of Tracy"! The only hard bit is the Eb artificial harmonic; it's a bit of a stretch. Everything else is natural harmonics, so you don't even have to worry about intonation.

    If you're into the tapping thing, get yourself the music for "Prelude in C" from Bach's "Well Tempered Clavier". Simple tune without any arduous stretches; sounds surprisingly good on bass guitar. (FYI, also serves as accompaniment to "Ave Maria".)
     
  7. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    if you have a 5 or more string, you can get that Eb on the b string, right around the 1st fret.
     
  8. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Learning scales and arpeggios is a great way of building up a basic vocabulary for soloing and improvising.
     
  9. Lovebown

    Lovebown

    Jan 6, 2001
    Sweden
    Hmmmmmm..Yes..but one doesen't exclude the other?

    Just because you can play the minor scale up and down don't mean you can make something musical of it. Only way for a beginner to understand soloing is to listen of other musicians solos and then build from there.

    /lovebown
     
  10. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Listening is tremendously important, but the individual must know the musical language so that they can translate what's in their head into their chosen instrument. People should listen every day, to all kinds of music, and especially the type of music they want to play, but I believe it's fundamentally important to understand music, and have the language of music under your fingertips to be able to play good solos. Copying someone else alone will never get you there.
     
  11. haleada

    haleada

    Jan 13, 2001
    thanks all. but for the comment about learning the theory and arpegios and scales. i know the really important ones. I am a 6 year music student in high school and i take piano on the side and am a conservitory level 5. I KNOW MY THEORY!!!

    I am looking for some neat bass licks to spice up my lines in the band i play with. I can do some basic slap and pop techniques.

    thanks again
     
  12. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    If that's the case, I don't understand the following at all!!! Seriously, I don't.

     
  13. Gabu

    Gabu

    Jan 2, 2001
    Lake Elsinore, CA
    Hmm...

    :confused:

    :rolleyes:

    I would imagine, if I knew music theory... simple bass solos that would sound complicated would be pretty easy to figure out.

    I suggest you continue to study your music theory as you may have missed a few things.
     
  14. 6-stringjazz

    6-stringjazz

    Jun 1, 2001
    Abq NM
    hmmmm... haleada, sounds like you need to also learn when to shut up. get off your high horse. I agree cold heartedly with jazzbo.
     
  15. Angus

    Angus Supporting Member

    Apr 16, 2000
    Palo Alto, CA
    What does "knowing when to shut up" have to do with anything? Some people aren't creative, I suppose. I could care less whether he knows his stuff or not, I do agree JT, etc, but what does "knowing when to shut up" and "being on a high horse" have to do with it? I don't see any horse here.
     
  16. Bass Guitar

    Bass Guitar Supporting Member

    Aug 13, 2001
    If you are classically trained in piano (as you claim to be) try to play one of those classical pieces on the bass - should not be too hard, and would impress me. But the main reason to play bass should not be to impress, but to create music and support the band. By being part of the music, and making the song better, that is impressive.
     
  17. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    A good lesson for everybody:

    FILL OUT YOUR PROFILE!

    It's almost impossible to help people - especially in this forum if you don't.

    The opening request :

    "i was looking for bass solos that sound hard but are not and will impress people? "

    sounds very much like the cry of a complete "newbie" and without any information in the profile, that's all we can assume.

    I think everybody who want help here, needs to "help themselves" as well - by completing their profile and also by stating their problem/request clearly and unambiguously - otherwise everybody wastes their time, by interpreting without any background information to go on.
     
  18. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Having said all that - back to the topic! I have met people in Jazz workshops etc , who have studied music for many years, but just can't improvise and when they are asked to solo over a simple tune just freeze up and can't play anything. It does happen.

    I think that most standard (non Jazz) theory study, doesn't necessarily prepare you to apply that knowledge to playing anything other than written parts. It's all very well knowing it "in theory" but actually applying this in "real time" is a different skill altogether.
     
  19. john turner

    john turner You don't want to do that. Trust me. Staff Member Administrator

    Mar 14, 2000
    atlanta ga
    i think i might know what the issue is - your problem might lie in the application of the theory that you know. after all, like bruce said, good solo technique is something that must be developed and learned outside of standard theory study.

    consider that a good solo is going to, in all likelihood, have a few of the following traits, if not all of them...

    1. a good melody
    2. a pattern of tension and release, which may build or cycle throughout, and may apply to rhythmic content or chordal/harmonic content.
    3. busting chops. ;) after all, that's what makes them cool, right?

    why don't you try the following - take some chord changes to a song that you know, a standard song out of the real book, or else some other song, it doesn't matter, and try to compose, on paper, a melody over those changes. apply the concepts that make a good melody - pleasing note selection and generally sticking to the key changes. figure out from your theory education the kinds of chords or chord tones that give tension to passages (anything from a passing 'out-of-key' note in a run to ornamental trills on non-triad tones like trilling the 4th and flat 5th) and what gives release (resolving to the tonic or an integral chordal tone)

    the chops part is actually the easiest aspect - once you've got a good melody that goes somewhere(has a pattern or cycle of tension and release, movement and growth) just ornament it. by this i mean make quarter notes into pairs of eighth notes, add a bunch of rhythmic grace or ghost notes, or fill in the notes between the notes in a simple progression. this is what will make the solo "cool" to the musician, but to the non musician, the first two aspects are more important. imo, all three are equally important for a good, memorable solo.


    as for "knowing when to shut up" -that's a ridiculous and hurtful comment :mad: very lame. this forum here is exactly for these kinds of questions, so that people can learn through discussion of ideas. telling someone to "shut up" pretty much defeats the purpose of a discussion forum, huh?
     
  20. jazzbo

    jazzbo

    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA
    Also, please don't affiliate me with that comment. My comment was that, if you are a conservatory pianist, than an easy bass solo, really should be easy for someone with the "musical" prowess you make claims to. Gabu echoed my sentiments.