Bass Warm-up

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [DB]' started by davegr8house, Nov 12, 2001.

  1. Hi Guys,
    Got a question. Why does my bass need to warm up? I mean, when I start practicing its sound really muted but after say, 20 min. its a whole different bass. Is it that the wood needed time to flex? I have also noticed that Bowing is much easier after it warms up. I dont need near the Rosin. Is this common? When I go to my lesson "with the bass in the back of a truck" my bass sounds like crap for half the lesson. It took me a while to get this. I just thought" need more rosin". Do any of you guys have this problem? Thanks for your time.

    --------------------------------------------------If the world didn`t suck we would all fall off:p
  2. !$#*@!*%$#%@!$#@%!#@!#@!$#@!$#!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  3. And furthermore, !@#$%^&*)(*&^%@#$%+=$#^^##$%#&&*)*%@. And I mean it.

    But yes, basses warm up, open up. Another reason to show up for the gig early.
  4. OK......Ok....I get it. I am shopping for an SUV but for now its the truck.....If it makes you feel any better its a unknown Chinese Bass......still nothing......All well:rolleyes:
  5. dhosek


    May 25, 2000
    Los Angeles, CA
    Oh heavens no. Just get a decent compact sedan with reclining seats. It'll hold the bass fine for a fraction of the price (plus you won't be contributing to the decline of western civilization by driving an suv).

    Me, I get around with a wheel and public transportation. (current longest walk with the bass: approx 1.5 miles).

  6. Hey,
    I`ve been shopping for an SUV for a while. Not just because of the URB but also Gig work in general. I play EB mostly and carrying a couple of EB`s, Amps, stands, gig bag, and then the Double Bass to few of them coming up I think a car would be a little small. Dont call Green Peace or anything. I am talking a small SUV. I didn`t mean to change the Threads subject.
  7. erik II

    erik II

    Jul 11, 2000
    Oslo, Norway
    I think what David and Don are trying to say is "Aarrrgghh!". :)

    FWIW, I have walked around town many a winter with my bass on my back, wrapped only in a thin fabric bag. Never did any harm. The cold isn't a problem, abrupt humidity changes is. Just leave the bass in its bag for a while when you get indoors.

    De-hozec: I live on the outskirts of town, and I have often travelled by public transportation (tramway or bus) with my bass. Problem is, I get in fine, but as the vehicle fills up as it moves downtown, it has sometimes been a problem getting out again.
  8. Gee....I feel so bad. Now every time I drive my 3/4 ton Surburban with the 454 c.i. engine I will be thinking about all of you taking public transportation to save the earth.
  9. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Don't feel bad at all. Giggling might even be appropriate...
  10. All I can say is, I'm glad you don't play toybass. I could probably hear you from Jersey.
  11. Don,

    Not to worry, It's queiter than my wife's new Toyota SUV. It does come in handy when we have away concerts. I hull half of the percussion section along with my bass.

  12. V8Hose:
    Take your bass with you to the car dealer and let us know what the sales associates' reactions are.
    I have a Jeep Cherokee and still have to remove the kids' seats and lower the back seat to get the durn thing in. It's either that or get whacked in the side of the head with the tuners while I'm driving.
  13. erik II

    erik II

    Jul 11, 2000
    Oslo, Norway
    mmm... '87 Mazda 929 station wagon... :)

    In the back: All the equipment - drum kit, three small amps, various bags and a small flight case, four guitars, one DB. In front: Myself and the drummer.
  14. Bernie T., bassist, friend, and cellmate of Philly Joe Jones, always got bucket seats when he bought a car. First thing he'd do was totally remove the passenger seat "to make room for the bass." It was entirely a coincidence that this meant his wife could never sit in the front. ;)
  15. dhosek


    May 25, 2000
    Los Angeles, CA
    Sounds like a vote against the SUV to me. I've successfully driven with my bass in a borrowed Dodge Spirit (compact sedan). I have a vague notion that when I was in HS, I was able to get it into my Dad's Plymouth Horizon.

    Sales associates reactions? I went car shopping with my girlfriend last year. With perhaps one or two exceptions the sales associates were all morons. They didn't know stuff about their vehicles that was in the brochure.

    Between not paying for a car, maintenance, gas, insurance, parking, etc., I easily save around $7200/year. Even if you deduct the cost of buses, cabs and the occasional car rental I'm well ahead of the game.

    It's not possible everywhere, certainly: When I lived in L.A. I had a car and used it. But anyone who spends $20-40,000 on an SUV to haul their bass is deluding themselves about what they need to do the job.

  16. I was relishing more the idea of their reactions if someone brought a double bass to the dealership and insisted on sticking it into the cars they were looking at to see how it fit.

    Otherwise, dead on right about choices--don't assume an SUV will be the right vehicle for your needs
  17. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY


    I used to have that problem in my Civic hatchback. I solved it by using a short bungee cord to attach the bass neck (near the scroll) to the passenger headrest. Works like a charm, and no damage to the bass. Try it - it might save you the trouble of removing all those seats.
  18. dhosek


    May 25, 2000
    Los Angeles, CA
    If I ever decide to get a car again, I will be doing exactly this. I'm thinking that the Toyota Prius looks like a good option (only problem is that there's currently about a 4 month waiting period to get one).

  19. Great idea! I'll give it a try. Thanx
  20. You shouldn't feel bad. Anyone living someplace like Mightytonkatruck Minnesota needs at least a Suburban, if not more.