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Bass Wheel

Discussion in 'Setup & Repair [DB]' started by E_bottom, Aug 14, 2002.


  1. E_bottom

    E_bottom Guest

    Mar 26, 2002
    Detroit
    I am in the prosses of looking for a bass wheel, and I would like to know 1> Does adding a wheel require any modification to the endpin or would I simply remove the endpin shaft and insert the wheel. 2> Can anyone suggest a particular brand or type of wheel or are they all about the same?
     
  2. Bob Gollihur

    Bob Gollihur GollihurMusic.com

    Mar 22, 2000
    New Joisey Shore
    Big Cheese Emeritus: Gollihur Music
    All wheels I've seen are inserted in the endpin assembly after removing the endpin shaft. I use, recommend, and sell Gaines wheels, which are at the top of the heap IMHO. They are pneumatic, which is important to absorb the road shock. http://www.urbbob.com/gaineswheel.html
     
  3. That's the same wheel that I use! Make sure that your endpin comes all the way out. One of my endpins required a little modification before the shaft was removeable.
     
  4. E_bottom

    E_bottom Guest

    Mar 26, 2002
    Detroit
    I just purchased a Misel wheel because I needed one and it was the one my luthier had. Is there a big difference between this one and a Gaines wheel? What make one wheel (Gaines, ili, Cinncinati Bass Cellar's, Misel, etc.) better or worse than another.
     
  5. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    I have the Bass cellar endpin, and I love it. I'm still carrying the bass over my shoulder while I'm young enough to do so, but that may not last long the way things are going (Translation: my **** is getting OLD and creaky...especially my knees and shoulders ). When I decide I'm tired of carrying it, the wheel for the Bass Cellar endpin simply screws onto the endpin - you don't have to remove the pin - and has a special attachment to hold the crutch tip part while you're using the wheel.
     
  6. mchildree

    mchildree Supporting Member

    Sep 4, 2000
    AL/GA
    How the hell do you drive one of those things with the wheel in, anyhoo? I always wondered this...once you angle the bass at all, doesn't the bottom tend to shoot out from under? Seems like a good idea, but it seems like a better one is for somebody (Bob?) to invent a cart arrangement of some kind.
     
  7. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    You get real good at it. I use the Gaines wheel with no air in it. Takes most of the bumps without nary a pound of shock reaching the bottom block.

    My technique is that the bass leads ribs first, with the end of the neck resting on my shoulder. I hook my arm through the shoulder strap of my Kolstein bag and grab the end of the shoulder strap right at the buckle where the strap meets the bag. For stairs down, I just push further into the bass and grab the front, top handle -- this way my arm is wrapped firmly around the neck as well, giving me a triple safeguard for case/handle failure. For going up stairs, I put the bass on my keister and grab the front, middle handle and lean forward.
     
  8. E_bottom

    E_bottom Guest

    Mar 26, 2002
    Detroit
    Chris,
    What do you love so much about the Bass Cellars endpin? What are the advantages over the average endpin (something like the standard Gotz). Do you the Messina (bass cellar) cover also?
     
  9. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY

    Well, first, the thing is built like a tank. It's relatively thick compared to most pins I've seen, and made of some sort of metal substance (some sort of steel hybrid???) that's about as hard as a diamond, and about as indestructible. The collar is brass, and very sturdy, as is the tightening screw on the collar, which also is very large and encased in comfortable to grip and turn plastic. The pin itself is fairly long and has notches at equal distances along its length, and a mechanism in the collar clicks firmly into place at each notch, so only a slight turning motion of the screw is needed to set the height. I set my endpin height at 7 notches, which I can do by feel or by sound without looking.

    The bottom of the pin has a collar around it which acts as the stopping point for various attachments. Beneath this, there is a very fine point made of some special composite that is supposed to stay sharp practically forever. I've stuck this point into a cement floor, and it held. Once I even stuck it into a marble floor on a gig where my crutch-tip kept sliding. The "normal" attachment is a screw-on heavy duty plastic piece which fits a crutch tip - the kind you can buy and easily replace at any drug store (black looks best) when they wear out. The wheel assembly (optional) simply attaches to the end of the endpin (you don't have to remove the pin) and is fixed by a set screw at the pin collar.

    What I love about this endpin is that I never have to think about my endpin anymore. No squeaks, groans, rattles, no hassle. And on any surface where the crutch tip won't grip, just remove it and punch a hole in the floor with the end of the pin and play...your bass won't be going anywhere until the gig's over. :)
     
  10. Adrian Cho

    Adrian Cho Supporting Member

    Sep 17, 2001
    Ottawa, Canada
    On surfaces where the crutch tip won't grip, how do you "punch a hole in the floor with the carbide tip?". You mean you hold the bass up a bit and slam it down to dig the tip in? That sounds scary?

    I'm thinking about the Mallott (Bass Cellar) endpin for a new bass. The only thing that concerns me is the inflatable wheel. I know they are good for absorbing shock but I've seen other guys get flats. I think the Onyx wheel is the way to go for wheels.
     
  11. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    Flats aren't a big deal. It takes about 10 minutes to break it down, patch the tube, put it together and pump up the tire. At most I do this once a month, but usually every two to three months. It'd probably be even less frequently but I run the tire pretty low.
     
  12. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    FOND MEMORY - I was working a joint on Atlantic Avenue with a vibes player and, on my way to the gig, I noticed my tire was getting a little low. So I drive over to Cobble Hill to park (forget about trying to find a space in Brooklyn Heights) and walk a block or so to the restaurant. Now on the Cobble Hill side of Atlantic, almost directly acroos from the joint, is a gas station. So I push my bass past the guy in his little CASHIER cubicle (ringing his little gas station "somebody's here" bell) over to the air pump and drop my quarter. This guy is in a state of maximum befuddlement, where's my car, what is this thing, why does it have a wheel, where's the air going?

    I was tempted to ask him to check the oil.
     
  13. Never been there, I have this romantic vision of NYC as a city where there are guys every block rolling their basses down the sidewalk on their way to a gig.
     
  14. anonymous0726

    anonymous0726 Guest

    Nov 4, 2001
    As well as parked at the top of the subway stairs trying to catch their breath from the schlep up.
     
  15. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Nah, the most bass players I seen in a subway car at one time is 3.
     
  16. Chris Fitzgerald

    Chris Fitzgerald Student of Life Staff Member Administrator

    Oct 19, 2000
    Louisville, KY
    Well, I never did buy the wheel for mine because as a relatively tall dude, it's just easier to use the shoulder strap. But to answer your question, all you have to do with the pointed tip is set the damn thing on the floor and it's so sharp it holds on every surface I've ever tried it on. The only complaint I've ever heard about the Bass Cellar enpin comes from NNICKELLOYDIAN, who complains that it's too heavy. It IS heavy as hell, but to me, it's worth it.
     
  17. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    re:shoulder strap - When I'm on the street with my bass and somebody asks me "Is that heavy?" my response is usually "Not for the first block."

    Out there in farm country where you can drive your pick up right up to the flatbed, oh excuse me, "stage" sure, you can get by with a shoulder strap. Me, I'm trying to find a way to install a Civic engine on my wheel. That way I won't have to park in Philadelphia for my next gig in midtown.

    Siriusly, having a wheel is a Good Thing anytime you gotta cart the thing for more than a coupla blocks. I have a strap for when I go up stairs. The only drag is that the wheel is too tall for the train. I need to be able to push the thing directly upright and put a foot on each side of the wheel to "lock" it into place. Otherwise you gotta hold it up for the entire trip. Ed no like. Gaines does make (or is it Andy Stetson's shop) a small wheel, mebbe I'll try one of them.
     
  18. Marcus Johnson

    Marcus Johnson

    Nov 28, 2001
    Maui
    Here y'go, Ed....just weld on an endpin attachment, and you'll be stylin'...

    www.segway.com
     
  19. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Damn, just what i need. A Yuppie scooter.

    Although...do they make a model with a cattle prod?
     
  20. hdiddy

    hdiddy Official Forum Flunkee Supporting Member

    Mar 16, 2004
    San Francisco, CA
    Better yet, a gunrack attachment! Now yer tawkin!