Bassless songs to improv to?

Discussion in 'Recordings [BG]' started by StrudelBass, Mar 14, 2003.

  1. StrudelBass


    Jul 6, 2002
    Anyone know of songs that preferably lack bass? I'm looking for something to improve my improv skills to.
  2. Matt Till

    Matt Till

    Jun 1, 2002
    Edinboro, PA
    White stripes?


    What I usually do, in a case like this, find some 3 chord songs... like CCR or something. And "solo".
  3. Wrong Robot

    Wrong Robot Guest

    Apr 8, 2002
    Think of it this can improv over any song, just think you are in a band with two bassists, one holds a groove while the other solos, and vice-versa.

    that's what I do with a lot of jaco stuff, I solo over the changes until jaco starts his solo, then I goto a groove.

    that said there is an instructional series called aebersold, I don't know if there is a bass series(I think there is) but basically its jazz standards sans ________(insert instrument here) designed for players to get a feel for soloing....many people diss aebersold, I've never actually used it, but it seems like a good Idea.
  4. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I've got quite a few of these and they are great for playing over and improvising - solos or bass lines - I've never heard anybody "diss" them and have heard nothing but praise! :confused:

    They all come with bass in one stereo channel and piano in the other, with drums in the middle - so if you turn the balance towards the piano you lose the bass - great! Turn it back and you can hear what the bass player was doing.

    You also get a book with the tune written out and the chords for imrpovising.
  5. moley


    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    I think I've heard criticism of them on the basis that what you're missing is the interraction between the soloist and the rest of the band. Sure, the soloist can react to the band - but the band can't react to the soloist. And of course, in Jazz, the band reacting to the soloist is an important part.

    Not that they're not really useful, just that there are limitations.
  6. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Well that applies to any practice tool - I don't think you can criticise them for that - this is just an inevitable "consequence" of working on music on your own.

    Of course you could alway use the books with other people as they all have parts for different instruments - so just copy or tear out the parts for sax, piano, bass etc. and use them with real people - I've done it many times!
  7. moley


    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK

    I've only used an Aebersold book/CD fleetingly in the past, but for what it is - it seems really good. Good playing, and the panning of the instruments is very useful.
  8. JimK


    Dec 12, 1999
    There's a whole Jazz "sub-genre" out there consisting of sax & drums only.
    Pick up Coltrane/Ali's Interstellar Space & try to keep up.
  9. moley


    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Hold it, why has no-one mentioned Kiss by Prince yet? :D
  10. JimK


    Dec 12, 1999
    ...'cause Tom Jones covered it?
  11. LiquidMidnight


    Dec 25, 2000
    True, but I think someone who has little to no expierence in a jazz combo situation should at least have the mechanics down of what they are doing. I think that's where something like this would come in handy.
  12. moley


    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    True, true.
  13. anything off Metallica's "and justice for all" album :p

    I used to practise adding a bassline to "harvester of sorrow" on my 4track.
    whoever mixed that album must have been on drugs (by contrast you can actually hear Newsted on the cheaply-recorded $7.98 covers album:confused: )