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Battery Boxes and Preamps...

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by Mystral Hawk, Mar 4, 2006.


  1. Mystral Hawk

    Mystral Hawk

    Feb 10, 2006
    Hey guys, I want to thank you guys all for helping my earlier questions about which pickups...I decided to go active with some EMG P's.

    But now I'm interested in hooking it up with an OBP-1 preamp. Right now I already have a 9 volt in there for my EMG Pups and that takes up all my room under my pickguard (MIM Fender Pbass) so I assume Im going to need a battery box or something to stash my batteries. From what I read, the OBP requires 18 volts...so I was wondering would I just need to add an additional battery making it two batteries, or make it a total of three batteries?

    So what I'm asking is that...do I or should I get a battery box? Or could I just rout a little more underneath my pickguard. Or if the battery box is a better solution, should I go have it professionally done or do it myself (and how?)

    Thanks for your help guys and I look forward to hearing from you.
     
  2. Hollow Man

    Hollow Man Supporting Member

    Apr 28, 2003
    Springfield, VA
    The OBP-1 does not require 18V; it runs perfectly well on 9V. With 18V, you will have more available headroom, but that's not a requirement.

    You could route more room under the pickguard for a second battery, or could install a battery box. Either are perfectly acceptable options. I prefer battery boxes for quick changes, but that's me. It's not a terribly difficult route (I learned how to route and install batter boxes literally two weeks ago), but IMO, it's not a good job for beginners. A professional could do it relatively quickly, on the other hand. If you're careful, routing under the pickguard is an easier task for beginners, but it still carries the risk of inadvertantly damaging the instrument, so make sure you've got a grasp on what you're doing before you get in over your head.