BEAD question

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by junkman510, Aug 5, 2005.

  1. junkman510


    May 2, 2005
    Lebanon, PA
    I would like to set up a 4 string with the 4 low strings of a 5 string bass (ie: B, E, A, D) I know I will have to cut the nut. Has anyone tried this? Will there be any problems that you can think of?
  2. Audiophage


    Jan 9, 2005
    Get a new nut instead, I think Warmoth sells them.

    I'm not sure about it but you may not even need a new nut.
  3. BigMikeW

    BigMikeW Banned

    May 25, 2005
    Nashville, TN.
    Banned by TB Administration for refusal to account for funds

    I use to do this for years. I had two of my Spectors set up this way.

    Audiphage is right. Take it to a get luthier/repair guy. Have them make you a new nut and then have it setup.

    It works great. Lots of guys do it. I just ended up switching to five strings so I don't do that anymore.

    Good luck.
  4. junkman510


    May 2, 2005
    Lebanon, PA
    Why did you go 5? Did you miss the G?
  5. BigMikeW

    BigMikeW Banned

    May 25, 2005
    Nashville, TN.
    Banned by TB Administration for refusal to account for funds
    Yes and the wider necks suit me better. Far more comfortable. I have had tendinitis problems and the wider, flatter necks fix about 80% of that for me(and others from what I have heard).

    Now I only play 5's. I have a couple fours laying around but never play them.
  6. Chef

    Chef Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    May 23, 2004
    Columbia MO
    Staff Reviewer; Bass Gear Magazine
    Like Mike, I tried this... I carefully filed the nut slots open. I missed the g-string terribly (insert obvious jokes here), and eventually filled the nut back in with baking soda and super glue (yes, it really works).

    Also like Mike I found that I preferred 5 string basses anyway, and now play them nearly exclusively (when not playing DB) while my 4 strings just get dusty.

    Find a 5 you like and spare yourself the headache. If you're not sure you'll like it enough to commit to spending for a good one, SX make one that's decent enough to feel it out on the cheap.
  7. Blueszilla

    Blueszilla Bassist ordinaire

    Apr 2, 2003
    The Duke City
    This is easily done, several threads on it, you can do a search. Taking it to a luthier is good advice, but if you are careful and precise, you can do it yourself. Of course, if you have a bone or brass nut, taking it to a pro is most likely the best way to go.

    I did this on 3 different basses and then later switched them back to EADG and it seemed to be no problem. I have 5's and 4's and use whatever the situation (in my own mind) requires. I like the feel of the 4's but the 5's extended range helps with working out new tunes.
  8. DannyB


    Aug 17, 2004
    If you are patient enough and pay very, very, very close attention to the details, you can file the nut yourself. I did this on my SX and it worked great.

    When I opted to go back to EADG, I used the superglue/baking soda mixture to fill in the slots, then used an old set of strings (EADG) to file the slot back down to the proper width. You really have to be extra careful though or else you'll end up with stuff on your fretboard that could be hard to clean.

    I've been played with the filed-then refilled nut for months and it has worked just fine.

    I would definitely suggest reading up on nut repair first though. I went this route because money was tight at the time (read: I play an SX), had I had the funds then I would have used the luthier that I use now.

    It can be done.. but patience is a virtue.

    And don't forget too, depending on your bridge you might need to file out your low string hole as well. Mine was designed to accept a .105 or smaller.. A cheap little round file will be fine.
  9. bannedwit


    May 9, 2005
    Buffalo, NY
    GraphTECH has some good nuts for basses. I have one that is self-lubricating and has the strings slide right back into the nut and stuff like that. It was like $5 on ebay.