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beatles/oasis

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by patrickroberts, Feb 28, 2006.


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  1. patrickroberts

    patrickroberts

    Aug 21, 2000
    Wales, UK
    what scales/chords did the beatles/oasis use?
     
  2. cowsgomoo

    cowsgomoo gone to Longstanton Spice Museum

    Feb 8, 2003
    UK
    there are about 300 Beatles songs.. could you be slightly more specific?
     
  3. patrickroberts

    patrickroberts

    Aug 21, 2000
    Wales, UK
    just the general scale that they apllied their music too...was it the blues scale or what?
     
  4. cowsgomoo

    cowsgomoo gone to Longstanton Spice Museum

    Feb 8, 2003
    UK
    the scales and chords they used varied according to the songs... and changed over the years...

    the second best thing you could do is go and Google chords to Beatles songs and see what they used...

    and the very best thing you could do is listen to them & work it out

    most of their stuff wasn't especially blues scale based... a lot of it was generally diatonic major or mixolydian with an interesting chord alteration here & there in & out of bridges etc...eg they often put in a major chord where the diatonic chord is minor (eg on the 2nd)

    the use of the chord movement I-iii is characteristic & rather Beatley... the kind of thing they teach you not to do in harmony class

    another very beatley thing is: I-Imaj7-I7-IV... where you turn a major 7 on the root into a dominant 7, which sets up movement to the 4th...

    anyway, check out this website: http://www.icce.rug.nl/~soundscapes/DATABASES/AWP/awp-notes_on.html
     
  5. AspiringBassMan

    AspiringBassMan

    Dec 10, 2005
    UK
    patrickroberts
    hopefully, when you've learnt some of the beatles and oasis songs, you can move onto more talented artists such as robbie williams :D. beatles and oasis songs are really easy because they only ever managed cheesy throw-away-pop songs. the beatles only ever did simple 3 chord songs except in a few rare exceptions.
     
  6. ToR-Tu-Ra

    ToR-Tu-Ra

    Oct 15, 2005
    Mexico City
    A few rare exeptions being almost all of the white album? or abbey road? I agree that the beatles' songs are not the most difficult out there, but they're not just three chords and you're ready to go.

    I still don't see the conection between the beatles and oasis?:eyebrow:
     
  7. AspiringBassMan

    AspiringBassMan

    Dec 10, 2005
    UK
    the beatles did throw-away-pop songs.......and oasis copied them.
     
  8. theshadow2001

    theshadow2001

    Jun 17, 2004
    Ireland
    Really? :eyebrow: I would of called oasis more of a beatles tribute band than an originals band. They ripped them off so much. But thats a discussion for a different part of talkbass.
     
  9. puff father

    puff father

    Jan 20, 2006
    Endicott, NY
    Yesterday, A Day in a Life, A Little Help From My Friends, and a few dozen more forgettable songs... :rolleyes:

    Abby Road, Sgt. Peppers album, Rubber Soul, Revolver... lots of other bands have at least as good, eh?

    The Beatles?!? They'll never catch on!

    They'll never last! lol

    Sarcasm mode off... :)

    :help:
     
  10. cowsgomoo

    cowsgomoo gone to Longstanton Spice Museum

    Feb 8, 2003
    UK
    incorrect... they were not Dream Theatre but most Beatle songs had more than 3 chords.. to be blunt, you don't know what you're talking about
     
  11. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member


    Mention of Robbie Williams, indicates to me a heavy dose of sarcasm, here!! ;)
     
  12. AspiringBassMan

    AspiringBassMan

    Dec 10, 2005
    UK
    have you noticed how the catchiest tunes are often trashy pop. abba did lots of 'unforgettable' tunes too. so did elvis presley(he never wrote a song in his life), robbie williams, spice girls, britney spears, etc .



    i guess listening to them for most of my life isn't enough. you are the one who doesn't know what he's talking about. if you weren't such a guilible and naive individual, you would realise just what the beatles are all about. they were a totally overrated band who were in the right place at the right time and were marketed to a massive massive massive extent.
    i remember john lennon singing about 'give peace a chance' when he spent the most part of his married life to cynthia regularly kicking the crap out of her and his son, julian. what a hypocrite!



    yup, sarcasm to emphasise a very valid point ;).
     
  13. cowsgomoo

    cowsgomoo gone to Longstanton Spice Museum

    Feb 8, 2003
    UK
    we weren't talking about the hypocrisy of the members of the Beatles, or how overrated they were, we were talking about the number of chords the Beatles used in their songs... in fact, your exact quote was:

    "the beatles only ever did simple 3 chord songs except in a few rare exceptions"

    and I said that was incorrect, because it was incorrect... you were wrong... that doesn't make you a bad person, just misinformed

    it seems a bit lame to be arguing over 'number of chords in Beatles songs', but you did bring it up, and you were incorrect... just be a man & accept what you said was incorrect...

    attempting to change the grounds of the argument by bringing 'John Lennon was a wifebeater' into it does you no favours... try losing one argument before moving onto the next
     
  14. phxlbrmpf

    phxlbrmpf

    Dec 27, 2002
    Germany
    I'm not exactly the biggest Beatles fan in the world, but their later songs past their "beat" phase definitely had more than three chords, most of them very pretty complex, actually.
     
  15. AspiringBassMan

    AspiringBassMan

    Dec 10, 2005
    UK
    are you merely counting the number of chords used in their songs?
     
  16. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

  17. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

  18. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Excerpt from the above :

    " Harmonic rhythm
    Since the Beatles songs in major consist of a total of 5058 bars and contain 5112 chord changes, it might be said that the average rate of change is once per bar. However, the harmonic rhythm is very varied, from songs totally without chord changes ("Within You, Without You," with its C drone) to songs with two chords per bar (e.g. "This Boy" and "I Will"). In a few cases there are more than two chords per bar; e.g. "You've Got To Hide Your Love Away," which has four chords per bar, if it is considered to be in slow 12/8 time.
    There are no rules for harmonic rhythm. A form part might use the same chord for six bars and then change once a bar in the last two bars (the verse of "Ticket To Ride") or change once a bar for two bars and then use the same chord for four (the intro of "Magical Mystery Tour"). While there is a tendency to "keep going in the same rhythm," e.g. one chord per bar, there are a multitude of exceptions. Two randomly chosen examples are the verse of "Sexy Sadie," with two chords in the first bar, one in the second, and then two chords per bar for six bars; and the verse of "From Me To You," with one chord per bar except in the seventh (next to last) bar, where there are two. Musically, this is easy to understand: Depending on which chords are used, a resting point might be needed anywhere in a period or form part.2

    [4] Harmony: songs in major
    Of the 210 Beatles songs, no less than 194 are in major keys. 165 of these are in the keys of E major (38 songs), G major (38), A major (36), D major (28) and C major (25). Of the remaining 29 songs, 10 are in F major, 6 in B, 4 in Bb, 4 in Eb, 2 in Ab, 2 in Gb; there is one song in Db. Although songs may have been transposed for different reasons--the famous splicing together of "Strawberry Fields Forever" from two takes in different keys being one example--this shows the dominance of the "guitar keys" of C, G, D, A and E major (cf. section 7).
    [5] The I, IV, V, vi and ii Chords
    The harmonic language of the Beatles mainly uses the chords I, IV and V (in C major: C, F and G major) and the relative minors vi and ii (A minor and D minor). Table 1 shows the frequencies of chords in songs in major, transposed to the key of C.
    The chords mentioned above can be combined virtually any way at all, provided that the I chord can be discerned as the tonic or "home" chord. In the key of C major, all the chords F, G, Am and Dm can have the penultimate position in cadence-like contexts or in entire songs. The IV and V chords are used more frequently than the vi and ii chords in this way, but these relative minors are by no means uncommon.

    Table 1. Frequencies of chords in major songs (transposed to C major)

    [​IMG]
     
  19. cowsgomoo

    cowsgomoo gone to Longstanton Spice Museum

    Feb 8, 2003
    UK
    well you started it by saying "the beatles only ever did simple 3 chord songs except in a few rare exceptions"

    in over 180 Beatle-penned Beatle songs I bet you can't name more than 25 (come on son, that's only a paltry 14%) that consisted of 3 or less chords

    I bet you for every ONE Lennon/McCartney/Harrison song the Beatles recorded that you can name that has 3 or less chords, I can name you SEVEN that have more than 3

    or you could just admit you were wrong on this point.. or you could just try and avoid the issue again by changing the subject again... bear in mind non-musical discussion is OFF-TOPIC in this forum
     
  20. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I isolated this part as it may be useful in answering the original question...?
     



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