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Becker Brand Basses

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by Whit Townsend, Mar 16, 2006.


  1. Anybody heard/have experience w/ this brandname?
    All I know is made in Romania w/ ebony fretboard.
    Can get laminate at a reasonable deal thru local music store.
    Would prefer to support this local business if practical.
     
  2. Brent Norton

    Brent Norton

    Sep 26, 2003
    Detroit, MI
    See if you can find out WHO in Romania produced it... It's most likely a Gliga, in which case you're looking at a decent instrument, provided the bass is well-set-up.
     
  3. <<<See if you can find out WHO in Romania produced it>>>>

    Yep, theres the rub, along with how are the woods selected and processed, gluing processes, general attention to quality, cost cutting methiods employed, etc.

    Agree if I could determine its origin in one of the Gilga factories

    Was hoping maybe there was a dealer here online, or someone who knew more. All I've been able to find out is itss the brand offered by one of the major US musical products wholesalers, made in Romaina, ebony fretboard.
     
  4. jgbass

    jgbass Guest

    Dec 17, 2003
    My first bass was a Becker and it was the part laminate/part carved model. I bought it at the local music store and I remember trying the laminate version, and it didn't sound nearly as good as this model. No one in the store knew anything about basses but they were happy to sell it to me, of course. I had not heard of places like Lemur Music at the time, where I could go the try out a number of basses, make comparisions, and make better decisions.

    I did not like that it was an Eb bass. This means that when you are positioned at the octave up the fingerboard, the note played is Eb vs. D. IMHO, makes it harder to play.

    After a year I decided to move on to a better bass. I honestly don't know what brought on that decision, but I know I had a heck of a time selling it. I think I started trying other basses and found out that they sounded so much better than what I had, and that I could do better for not too much more money. The color of it was not appealing to anyone else, it was an Eb instrument. It sat at Lemur Music for months and months on consignment with no interest. Some bass dealer sold it for next to nothing to a novice bluegrass player.

    I would suggest you scour the posts here for some info on what entry-level basses folks here suggest. I think the suggestions here are usually right on, based on experience, and with good intentions to help other newbies out. I just bought a French bow for $140 from Bob Golihur, based largely on the suggestions and good reviews here and I cannot believe what a great bow this is and that I only paid $140 for this.

    At least try out some other basses in order to make some good comparisions. For the price of the bass, I think you might be able to get a better bass.
     
  5. thanks jgbass,

    Glad to hear from someone with experience with one.
    I am aware of the advantages of ordering from Bob, Upton, Lemur, etc. The local store is bluegrass/folk oriented, a rarity in these parts and are nice people, so I would like to support them if possible. They can order Englehearts, "Crapitinos" and these Beckers, so thats the reason I asked for the info. Since they were stated to have ebony fretboards and E. European in origin, sounded like might be worth looking into. From you comments looks like I'll aboid them. I would like to get a new Cleveland, but thats financially out of the question. If I can afford it and my old Kay holds up long enough and top dosn't cave in, I might be able to swing the $2000 for a nice laminate Shen from Nick Loyd or an Upton Hawkes. THe pro set up would be worth it if I can swing it, but If not, I can get an adequate set up done locally or do it myself. Otherwise looks like I'll have to settle for an Engl. EM1 or ES. If thats ther route I go, I'll prob. go thru the local store if they can get close to Bob on price. At least I know what I'll be getting as opposed to some of the other 1000-1500 Strunals and the like. I know from personal experience that the low priced Chinese Palintinos, Cremonas, etc. are a crapshoot structurally and to avoid them.

    From the net I've run across the ROMAS and EBERLES discounted from that closeout in NY that would fit the budget nicely. If anybody has any direct experience with those I'd appreciated hearing from them.He also has Wilfers which I've heard good things about, but they're a little costlier.

    Of course I'd like a deep fat tone for bluegrass, but MOST important to me is roadworthness and durability. So I'm not really considerering a carved or hybrid bass. I usually play live thru a PU and pre amp thru the PA anyway. I'm more concerned with someithing that can take some abuse and weather at festivals, transporting to gigs, and so on. If I need a better bass for recording I can borrow an old Kay or Standard pretty easily.

    Thanks all.
     
  6. Stan Haskins

    Stan Haskins

    Nov 17, 2005
    NY and Miami

    Sounds to me like you want an Englehard.
     
  7. yea, Englehard, good one, noisemaker. I know at least it'll prob. hold up for the rest of my playing life!

    Also am intreagued by the the "road warrior" claims of the new Kingbasses, despite the gaudy rockabilly dress. Altho could live the blonde/black trim model, not too bad flashy.

    You know, if the price was right, I'd even consider a Engl. or equal "in the white", if there was such a thing. Know a local body man who'd paint er up for a song. Gold top Les Paul color w/creme trim would be pretty darn cool. Heck w/the bluegrass police.
     
  8. jgbass

    jgbass Guest

    Dec 17, 2003
    From what I have read here, the Shen's are well regarded. A professional set up, I think, is essential. Good luck. Let us know what you decide.

    I actually have a Chinese bass (Sunrise) from Lemur and I have been very happy with it. Its a 5/8 carved, but they have laminate versions below $2000. It gets bounced around in my travels, wheeled and bounced long distances at school, shoved in and out of my vehicles numerous times, and has held up very well for years Looks and sounds good and have gotten many compliments on both. I think some Chinese basses are just fine, and this line has been a best seller for years at Lemur.
     
  9. fish slapper

    fish slapper

    Nov 17, 2005
    Tigard, OR
    I am still extremely happy with my Shen blonde laminate. I think that most places that include set-up your total cost will still fit under your 2k budget.

    Can't emphasise the value in buying locally if you can. It will not only help you to play several basses, but if there is "fine tuning" to do on the set up, you can go back.

    Mark
     
  10. I could only relate my own experience with the Roma bass, and it has been very favorable. Owned it now for a year and a half. My luthier was impressed with the quality of the ebony and overall construction. The sound has really opened up. For a budget plywood this is a great deal.
    Good hunting . . ;)
     
  11. mchildree

    mchildree Supporting Member

    Sep 4, 2000
    AL/GA
    Whit, you also have the option to drive up to Atlanta. There are a few dealers there that sell a wide range of basses, so you can get a better look. You could stop here (it's about halfway) and check out my basses for comparison's sake, and maybe get some barbecue....
     
  12. Fred W

    Fred W

    Feb 21, 2002
    Bronx, NY
    In Autumn 2005 I played a carved Roma at Ideal Music in NYC. I didn't buy it but I did like it. Big arco sound, easy string tension, good pizz sound with Helicore Orchestras. I didn't dig the angled fingerboard. The price was like $1800. I don't know how slowly they were built or the other factors that affect a bass's longevity, but I do know most of Ideal's basses have been in storage for a while, and that can only help. I was tempted.
     
  13. The basses at Ideal are excellent for the price. I've played the Roma carved and plywood, the carved Eberle, and thw Wilfers both carved and ply. If you're going to buy from Ideal and want a plywood the Wilfers seem to me the best plywoods in the bunch.
     
  14.  
  15. <<<<Can you say 'fingerboard'>>>>

    Well, excuse me .!.
     
  16. Don't be mad Whit....it is what it is. But it sure isn't a fret board.
     
  17. Heifetzbass

    Heifetzbass Commercial User

    Feb 6, 2004
    Upstate, SC
    Owner, Gencarelli Bass Works and Fine String Instruments, LLC.
    Good to see you are feeling better Paul! :p
     
  18. KSB - Ken Smith

    KSB - Ken Smith Banned Commercial User

    Mar 1, 2002
    Perkasie, PA USA
    Owner: Ken Smith Basses, Ltd.
    Paul, does just the word Fretboard get up an running these days?

    Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard .......FINGERBOARD>>> Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard Fretboard ......lol.. 'morning uncie Paulie..
     
  19. Thank you all. Whit, i'm known around here as a grumpy old ******. Please know that you aren't the only one whose chain has been pull by yours truly....especially on the subject of fingerboards and fretboards.