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BEEFY TONE

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by slipknot229, Nov 30, 2001.


  1. I have a (crappy) Ibanez GSR200 and I want to improve it to a degree so it will do me proud when i play it. I want a nice, beefy bass tone (somewhere between Justin's tone in Eulogy and the generic "punk" tone) from a good P-style p/up and as for the J-style p/up I'd like a warm, jazzy tone.


    In other words, what are some good P and J p/ups??


    thanks for the help
    -ChRiS
     
  2. Captain Awesome

    Captain Awesome

    Apr 2, 2001
    PDX
    I was wondering that too... More specifically, which pickups would combine well to make a good, matched P-J set? I like the sound of both P & J on full. (think Fender Hot Rod P) I know many people think putting new pickups on a cheap bass is a dumb idea, but...
    #1. I'm not going to sell my Ibanez anyway.
    #2. When I get another bass, I'll have a backup bass with good tone.
     
  3. Seymour Duncan quarter pounders
     
  4. BoogieNight

    BoogieNight

    Jun 15, 2001
    Brazil
    What does "beefy" mean???

    Sorry but I can't find that word in my little English-Portuguese dictionary...
     
  5. beefy=thick, lots of substace to it .....@ least that't the definition I'M going by...:D
     
  6. BoogieNight

    BoogieNight

    Jun 15, 2001
    Brazil
    hehe, thanks slipknot!
     
  7. lo-end

    lo-end

    Jun 15, 2001
    PA
    For a P pickup, I recommend the Seymour Duncan Hot for P Bass. It has a lot of mids and has a "punk" sound. Do not get the Quarter Pounders! They have scooped mids, and are NOT good for punk. I got them because everyone told me they were, but I have to disagree. They are better suited to funk and slapping than punk.

    For a J, I would recommend Bartolinis. Bartolinis have a very smooth, jazzy sound to them and are very bassy. They just have an output thats a little bit lower than normal, so theyll be a little bit quieter than you might expect.
     
  8. Flatwound

    Flatwound Supporting Member

    Sep 9, 2000
    San Diego
    The "beefiest" pickups I have used are EMG's. The EMG-P is thunderous, with a smooth, clean top end. In fact, I have to cut the bass if I'm using an EMG-P equipped bass in any room that tends toward boominess. The EMG-J isn't overly harsh and compliments the P nicely. One advantage the EMG P-J set has over mixing and matching various pups is that the volume levels are pretty evenly matched. So if you roll the J off and turn up the P, you're not suddenly a lot louder, which can happen with some setups.
     
  9. if i may suggest an alternative to new pickups... get a sansamp BDDI.
     
  10. I would not suggest getting different pups, they wont be matched, and will not sound good, unless you get *very* lucky.

    I think EMG makes a matched P/J set, Ive heard some good stuff about them, might want to look into that.
     
  11. lo-end

    lo-end

    Jun 15, 2001
    PA
    yeah man. actually, forget my last post. :D

    EMG makes awesome pups, I completely forgot. You should look into an EMG P/J set.
     
  12. Brendan

    Brendan

    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    How odd that I find myself in a simmilar P/J dillema. I think those EMGs sound mighty tastey, but, what would be a good passive pre-amp to compliment them?
     
  13. Flatwound

    Flatwound Supporting Member

    Sep 9, 2000
    San Diego
    Sorry Brendan, but did you want a preamp, or passive controls? The stock EMG pots (passive) work pretty well, but EMG also makes various active circuits you can use. I haven't tried them; my EMG experience is limited to the passive controls.
     
  14. Brendan

    Brendan

    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    my bad. Passive controls.
     
  15. Flatwound

    Flatwound Supporting Member

    Sep 9, 2000
    San Diego
    Just kidding. EMG actives want 25k Ohm pots. The simplest thing is just to use EMG pots, which I think are pretty nice. They operate smoothly and have a nice taper. They aren't overly expensive, either. They even sell some prewired pot assemblies.
     
  16. CrawlingEye

    CrawlingEye Member

    Mar 20, 2001
    Easton, Pennsylvania
    I think the quarter pounders were a good suggestion.

    I think your best bet would be to try, maybe a new bass? Something like a Fender P/j and just throw the quarter pounders in there, along with one of SD's "warmer" pups.