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beginer practice exercises?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by damageinc11, Feb 5, 2001.


  1. I was wondering if any one could guide me in the direction of some solid exercises for a begining bass player? right now I have "Larry Little's Learn Bass Guitar Book Vol. 1" with the VHS for vol 1 & 2. I use that often. in addition to that I look through various tab books, and tab postings (on this site) and try to play my way through. (i basically do this to try to see if I can match sounds as well as work on my fingering) any help would be greatly appreciated

    ~Jeremy~
     
  2. SuperDuck

    SuperDuck

    Sep 26, 2000
    Wisconsin
    Depending on which way you want to go, you should probably devote some time each day to reading sheet music. I don't know if that's covered by Larry Little or not, but learning to read can only help. Yes, tab gets the job done, but learning to read music gives you much more information in terms of rhythm and feeling. You don't have to start with a Bach symphony, just start by acquainting yourself with the bass (and treble if you feel the need, again, it can't hurt) clefs, and where the notes are on the staff.

    Good luck!
     
  3. Boplicity

    Boplicity Supporting Member

    There are many excellent lessons here at talkbass and at two other sites, activebass.com, bass101.com and bassplayer.com Also, if you check out Bass Player magazine, they have a section each month called The Woodshed, that has helpful lessons.

    jason oldsted
     
  4. brianrost

    brianrost Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 26, 2000
    Boston, Taxachusetts
    Solid exercises for a beginner:

    -- Scales in all 12 keys over two octaves: major, natural minor, harmonic minor and melodic minor. Play ascending and descending, also in thirds.

    -- Chord arpeggios: major, major 7th, dominant 7th, 9th, minor, minor 7th, diminished, augmented. Play in all inversions (i.e. starting on any note in the chord).

    There are books on scales and chords that will explain any of the above terms you don't understand.



     
  5. Deeter

    Deeter

    Dec 5, 2000
    San Fransico, CA
    -- Chord arpeggios: major, major 7th, dominant 7th, 9th, minor, minor 7th, diminished, augmented. Play in all inversions (i.e. starting on any note in the chord).

    I know this is probably an ignorant question, but I recognize all those chords and their constructions except, "dominant." What scale degrees make up a dominant chord? I thought that dominant chords were I, IV, and V in a key . . . . Anyway, thanks in advance.
     
  6. frederic b. hodshon

    frederic b. hodshon Supporting Member

    May 10, 2000
    Lake Forest, CA
    None.
    Deeter said:

    I know this is probably an ignorant question, but I recognize all those chords and their constructions except, "dominant." What scale degrees make up a dominant chord? I thought that dominant chords were I, IV, and V in a key . . . . Anyway, thanks in advance.

    response:

    lets take C Major as our reference key.

    C D E F G A B C

    I ii iii IV V vi vii(half dim)

    maj min min maj DOM min halfdim.

    so, you see that the I, IV and V "TRIADS" are major.

    it is not until you add the 7th to the triad that you are able to distinguish the V DOM from the I or IV

    I7 = C E G B

    V7 = G B D F

    maybe a better comparison to illustrate the flatted 7th of a DOMINANT chord:

    C Maj 7 = C E G B

    C DOM 7 = C E G Bflat

    hope that helps a bit.

    fred

     
  7. Deeter

    Deeter

    Dec 5, 2000
    San Fransico, CA
    Okay, that definitely makes it a bit clearer . . . but spell it out a bit farther for me:

    Does that make any chord with a 1, 3, 5, b7 construction a Dominant cord, and the V7 is always dominant because the notes in its chord happen to align in like fashion. Or is it just that a V7 chord is dominant, just because? Sorry to hound about this, I just want to make sure I understand it completely.

    Thanks again!
     
  8. frederic b. hodshon

    frederic b. hodshon Supporting Member

    May 10, 2000
    Lake Forest, CA
    None.
    Deeter said:

    Does that make any chord with a 1, 3, 5, b7 construction a Dominant cord, and the V7 is always dominant because the notes in its chord happen to align in like fashion. Or is it just that a V7 chord is dominant, just because? Sorry to hound about this, I just want to make sure I understand it completely.

    response:

    Yes, ANY chord with a 1 3 5 b7 is a DOMINANT 7th chord.

    To get down and dirty, to really understand why this is so, you need to understand intervals and to a lesser degree modes.

    Major 7th chords are typically built on 3 stacked intervals:

    Maj 3rd - Min 3rd - Maj 3rd

    Minor 7th chords are built on 3 stacked ints:

    Min 3rd - Maj 3rd - Min 3rd

    Dom 7th:

    Maj 3rd - Min 3rd - Min 3rd (hence the flat 7th when compared to a major 7th chord)

    a modal explanation is more complicated.

    fred