beginner new to post multiple questions lol

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by yearofthespider, May 15, 2003.

  1. yearofthespider

    yearofthespider Guest

    May 15, 2003
    Oklahoma City
    Let me just start by saying i'm new to talkbass and have already spent the last 3 hours checking everything out. This site is sweet. Best bass site ive found by far.
    I'm 27 and new to playing music. I grew up hard in the dhs system and never had the cash or a helping hand in music. So needless to say I'm use to teaching myself everything. Ive been playing a little over a month an have about 10 diff children songs to memory. mostly melodys but im learning a few bass lines here and there. I just learned the bass line for 16 candles by the crests. I'm in my 4th day working on it and it sounds pretty close to the radio version. the 4 day thing is that normal time frame to learn a song, or am i just really slow? ive tried some tab by thin lizzy but man its just to fast i end up with extra tab when the song is over. Im having a hard time hearing all the bass in the songs, sometimes it just seems to repeat itself over and over but when i play it it comes out crappy. what does it mean to play in the pocket with the drummer??? and i cant figure out the I - IV chords i dont even understand what the hell the book is trying to tell me to do. the first five frets are super easy, i can play just about every piece of tab with just those frets listed. My troubles begin when i have to move up and down the neck. anyone have these troubles when they started?? How do you think im doing in the amount of time ive been playing?? Is this all normal or am i just screwed up?
    any help any of you can give will be recieved with much gratitude. You have all my thanks in advance

    Danny Ross
  2. Danny R.

    Danny R. Supporting Member

    Hey Danny, welcome to talk bass:bassist: :D
  3. Blueszilla

    Blueszilla Bassist ordinaire

    Apr 2, 2003
    The Duke City
    Welcome, I'm kinda new myself. Most everyone is friendly and helpful. If you want information on a particular subject, try the search feature, as it is the fastest way to find information that may have already been discussed in past threads.

    IME, 'in the pocket' just means that you and the drummer are in a solid groove, bass notes and bass drum together.

    Good luck and keep it low...:cool:
  4. yearofthespider

    yearofthespider Guest

    May 15, 2003
    Oklahoma City
    ok another question i forgot to put in the first thread. I use my thumb to strum with. Ive tried the two finger thing and its as unatural to me as trying to play a right handed guitar or bass. if i continue to play this way am i gonna run into problems in the future? does anyone else do this? Ive also given up using a pick for the most part. too me the thumb or finger style just sounds much more personalble. although i do like the up and down stroke with a pick. thanks again in advance

    Danny Ross
  5. jazzbo


    Aug 25, 2000
    San Francisco, CA

    There is nothing wrong with being self-taught. You have to do what you have to do. What I suggest, and I simply cannot suggest this strongly enough, is to take 2 lessons. Find a teacher, and find the money, to take two lessons. We can all find the money for two lessons. Maybe we don't buy the DVD and CD this month. Maybe we eat at home, instead of McDonald's. Save your money, take two lessons, and learn the fundamentals of technique, the bass, and music. This will save you months of frustration at the beginning.

    Excellent. You want to keep challenging yourself and stretching. Learning as much as you can. Finding out that you can produce something musical can be extremely rewarding, and help create a passion for the instrument.

    Are you in a race? Do you have a deadline? I say this facetiously but the point is, many people who play instruments talk about their development relevant to the amount of time they've been playing. It doesn't matter. It doesn't matter if it takes you 2 minutes or 2 weeks to learn a bassline. It takes you however long it takes you. You learn differently from me and I am different from you and so on and so on. It's just the way it goes. Forget time. You are not racing anyone else. You're developing as a musician. If you keep doing this, and keep focused, I guarantee you it will get easier and easier and easier, and time won't be a problem. But for now, just stay focused and studious and you'll be okay.

    I bet when the Beatles were exploding onto the scene that the sales of guitars and basses went through the roof. People would buy a bass and come home and listen to Paul and want to be like him. But they didn't sign on to AOL in the 60s. They didn't have tab. They learned it by ear, and they were better for it. Tab, I'm sorry to say, will stunt your development. They're often wrong, they don't help you develop and idea for the structure of music, they give you no hint into what you're playing at all. I know a lot of bassists, and the ones that I call bassplayers, not *musicians* are the ones that are stuck without tabs. Develop your ear. Even if it takes you 20 days to learn a song now instead of 4. Because that next song won't take as long, and the next will be even quicker. Tabs will stunt your growth as a musician.

    The "pocket" is defined as the groove. Establishing a tight groove is your main job. How is it done? Well, there are hundreds of explanations. You can play as fancy as you want, but it doesn't mean anything if you're not in time. Your main goal isn't double-thumbing, tapping, slapping and all that crap. Your main goal is to play solid rhythm. Buy a metronome. There are so many exercises you can do. This is where a teacher comes in handy. Rhythm is far more important than fancy fills and the like. Remember, your job is to lock down solid with that drummer.

    The wonderful world of music theory. Start with the link I'll post, and work your way from there. There's a lot to know, but I find it quite fun and interesting.

    <a href=""><img src="" width="175" height="150" border="0" alt="Barbell Duck wants you to learn about THEORY!!! Click here and you CAN pretend nothing happened!"></a>

    I don't remember if I had similar problems, but facility on the instrument does not come overnight. Again, a teacher does wonders here, but you must do what you must. Playing and practicing scales and arpeggios, along with many other things, is certainly going to help you here. Do a search for scale practice ideas. Pacman has an amazing thread, as does Ed Fuqua, (but I think Ed's post is in the DB section of TB).

    It doesn't matter what I think. What do you think. Measure only against yourself. In development there is no normal of "screwed up." We all develop at our own rate. As long as you are always moving forward, you're okay. I do strongly suggest the "only two lessons" thing though, because a teacher can look at your technique and tell you how you're doing. If you are using poor technique, this could lead to injuries down the line.

    George Porter, Jr., bassist for the Meters, does this. I don't like it, and don't think you can gain the same facility, tone and control with it, but it certainly isn't wrong. Use whatever technique is comfortable for you, and doesn't cause you discomfort or pain; however, I would suggest giving more time to the two-finger approach.

    YEAH! Just kidding. The most recorded bassist of all time played with a pick, (of course, it doesn't mean I have to like it, or her!!! ;) ). Sometimes it's good to have the skill of a technique, even if you don't plan on using it, or like it, just to be diverse. Of course, if everything else is there, I doubt you'd be denied a gig because you didn't use a pick.

    Good luck Danny. And don't forget to check in frequently with updates.
  6. yearofthespider

    yearofthespider Guest

    May 15, 2003
    Oklahoma City
    Thanks alot Jazzbo thats great help man. Taking your words to heart. about to go check out that link right now.