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Beginner questions

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by SpiderDan, Jun 28, 2004.


  1. SpiderDan

    SpiderDan

    Jun 28, 2004
    hey every1 i realy wanna play the bass guitar and i went out and spotted 1 today and reserved it its a ibanez EDB600
    I'm quite interested in a bass because i have a electric guitar and i find it kinda small to play so i think i need somthin that i can hold on to and give a good beating lol

    jus wanna know if you guys can help i want some good sites and some beginer stuff like practisin and scales n stuff

    Thanx
    Dan
     
  2. kirbywrx

    kirbywrx formerly James Hetfield

    Jul 27, 2000
    Melbourne, Australia.
    Hey, welcome to talkbass.
    Since your a guitarist, i presume you are used to how to play an electric stringed instrument remotley correct. How told hold the thing once you get it is a big part on how you will sound. Do you have any theory knowledge? If not (well, even if you do) i reckon you should get a teacher. They are the best possible thing to learn from.

    If you get regular lessons and do both theory work and prac work, aswell as jam with a few other musicians every now and then, you'll be on your way to being on hell of a bass player. Also, dont confine yourself to one style of music. Listen to everything. Dont just say you do, actually do it. I have plenty of friends that say they are into funk and have no idea who Herbie Hancock or Miles Davis are.

    Now go burn that guitar :)
     
  3. SpiderDan

    SpiderDan

    Jun 28, 2004
    cool thanx

    i kinda know i bit about tab and how to read it is this ok?

    and how much money is it for lessons?
     
  4. Bardolph

    Bardolph

    Jul 28, 2002
    Grand Rapids, MI
    I'd say to get started you should jump right into listening and transcribing. Don't worry too much about getting your technique down, it will just come with time. The basic thing to remember is that a string will not respond well unless it is plucked firmly. Usually an agressive attack with a pick will do the job well. Some must-know basslines can be found in recordings such as You Can't Hold No Groove and Classical Thump. In order to play fast, you must practice fast, even if it is sloppy for a while. Making a habit of practicing slowly will eventually develop into a tendancy to slow down set tempos. Scales and arpeggios are quite overrated. There aren't many songs that groove too well with the bassist just running up and down the scale modes. Don't bother listening to much stuff by Jaco Pastorius either. He is yesterday's news, and unless you don't want to be a real player in the modern world, don't waste your time on old stuff nobody likes anymore or else that will become you. That's just my two cents though.
     
  5. SpiderDan

    SpiderDan

    Jun 28, 2004
    My real insparation is Ryan from Mudvayne he plays so fast but it sound so good i realy wanna play like that

    but i already know what your gonna say "it takes time and effort" and "dont run before you can walk" but i realy wanna get my teeth into somthing like that.

    and wich is best a 5 or a 4 string?
     
  6. Eyescream

    Eyescream

    Feb 4, 2004
    Knoxville, TN
    I dig Ibanez basses, although I'm not a big fan of the ergodyne stuff like you're looking at, they're fine instruments probably and the key is that you're happy with it. Once I got my 5 string and got used to it, I decided never to look back, but there's a ton of people that play 4 string basses and will never pick anything else up. Start on whatever you like. You'll get used to it soon enough. :D

    Re: Ignoring Jaco and other "old" players:

    I dunno about all that. I think it's a good idea to know where things are coming from with regard to stylistic differences.

    Original poster: The only advice I have to give is that you should listen to everything. Even stuff you don't think you'll like. You never know whether an idea for a badass bassline in <insert your favorite genre to play> will come from, and it's good to keep your options open.

    I started playing by picking through Primus and RATM tabs and trying to play along with the songs. You've got to do things other than just staring at the wall or the sheet music and playing scales and **** cause otherwise it starts to feel like work.

    Learn theory, and learn how to read music. Pretty soon people are going to want you to start making **** up, and it's good to have a roadmap of sorts (from the theory) to give you a place to start with the creation process.

    Go forth and be groovy, my young friend. :D
     
  7. SpiderDan

    SpiderDan

    Jun 28, 2004
    Cheers mate

    and thnax for the advice

    Dan
     
  8. Stachio

    Stachio Supporting Member

    Jan 29, 2002
    Atlanta
    Is that sarcasm? Jaco made modern bass what it is. I'm not the biggest fan of Weather Report but I still don't deny that his playing has shaped the electric bass guitar world. Even Ryan Martinie would probably agree.
    I partially agree with the arpeggio and scale statement. You definitely need to get some theory down and know your scales and arpeggios. But you should also think about how to apply those to more musical applications than just being able to play them at blinding speeds. They're the mechanics of playing, but you have to put them to use.
     
  9. SpiderDan

    SpiderDan

    Jun 28, 2004
    Cheers mate

    and thnax for the advice

    Dan
     
  10. Eyescream

    Eyescream

    Feb 4, 2004
    Knoxville, TN
    Exactly. An analogy: Knowing how to make a car fast doesn't mean you can drive it fast without killing yourself.
     
  11. MascisMan

    MascisMan

    Nov 21, 2003
    Dallas, Tx
  12. Planet Boulder

    Planet Boulder Hey, this is a private residence...man

    Nov 10, 2001
    6,482 feet above sea level
    I once had impure thoughts. Oh, and I pluck my ear hair.

    With all due respect, I find this to be unwise advice. If you've ever read/heard/seen any interviews with Jaco, or if you've ever listened intently to his playing, you know that the guy is about as "real" as they get in terms of understanding/appreciating theory, promoting discipline and stressing the need for an incredibly solid foundation.

    You don't have to be able to play like Jaco to be able to glean innumerable amounts of valuable information from him.

    I would have given my left foot to have studied under him.
     
  13. appler

    appler Guest

    Guys, I think Eskimo was joking. :confused:
     
  14. SpiderDan

    SpiderDan

    Jun 28, 2004
    Thanx for the site buddy its well useful
     
  15. Eyescream

    Eyescream

    Feb 4, 2004
    Knoxville, TN
    I thought of that, because everything he said flies in the face of conventional wisdom.

    But I need more posts before I can get my prize, so I thought I'd throw my two pence in anyway.
     
  16. Bardolph

    Bardolph

    Jul 28, 2002
    Grand Rapids, MI
    Thank you, small percentage of people, for recognizing my sarcasm. I thought the Jaco comment would be a dead giveaway. Basically, make my entire post bizzaro and it should be decent advice.
     
  17. Whafrodamus

    Whafrodamus

    Oct 29, 2003
    Andover, MA
    Made me snicker :p.. I got a good chuckle.
     
  18. Eyescream

    Eyescream

    Feb 4, 2004
    Knoxville, TN
    :D
     
  19. Whafrodamus

    Whafrodamus

    Oct 29, 2003
    Andover, MA
    Typing lessons + Bass lessons = :cool:
     
  20. Eyescream

    Eyescream

    Feb 4, 2004
    Knoxville, TN
    You know, he's doing better than most at the whole typing thing.

    I'm about ready to give up on that and people using the search function, anyway.