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Berklee Online

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Already In Use, Mar 30, 2013.


  1. Already In Use

    Already In Use

    Jan 3, 2010
    I'd really like to take a few courses offered by this place. The prerequisite requirements seem to offer a road block for me. Being able to read. I cant sight read. I can create charts to play from off of notation. What, in your opinion is the best approach? My goal is to study jazz and music theory. I can play, record, have a good foundation(IMHO) in theory and have performance experience. Do I learn to sight read before making contact?

    Want you to be able to read tab or notation? Tab?

    There isnt anything local for me that's offered online. I cant attend class in person. Thanks...peace.:bassist:
     
  2. Already In Use

    Already In Use

    Jan 3, 2010
    The last hour and a half produced my answer. Theory 101 is where I start. What I've learned? Need to be able to read to advance one's education in music..officially that is. Thanks for reading. I appreciate the looks. Sorry if I hurried and wasted anybody's time.
     
  3. Dave W

    Dave W Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2007
    White Plains
    I'd be looking someplace other than Berklee to take a theory course, it's bound to be much cheaper.
     
  4. Zootsuitbass

    Zootsuitbass Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2011
    find some one who goes there via here.

    Pay them to buy and mail the theory 1 book and workbook. DO THE WORK........

    Repeat.

    Will cost you like 30 bucks (and a 100 hours of your life.)
     
  5. ShoeManiac

    ShoeManiac Supporting Member

    Jan 19, 2006
    New Jersey
    RE: Sight reading....

    I caught a Victor Wooten clinic a few years back. He's a very cool clinician, and was totally down to earth and approachable. One thing he emphasized during the session was the ability to sight read, and how crucial it is to a wide range of music even in some styles where you'd think it would be less likely as a job requirement.

    I approached Victor after the session to talk about just that: sight reading. I told him that my sight reading skills were poor at best, and what would he recommend as far as building them up? His response was genuinely surprising, but it made a lot of sense. He told me to come up with a part on the bass and THEN try to translate that to the page in the form of written notation. In that case you're not trying to decipher the notes that are on the page, but rather you're translating something you already know into written notation.
     
  6. Already In Use

    Already In Use

    Jan 3, 2010
    A few great answers. Thanks. The Berklee books are on Ebay! I wanted to, initially take the jazz course and the bass course at Berklee..which required pre req's. I signed up for a jazz history, theory lite class at our local community college. I am getting by fine in my current position playing bass utilizing fake chord charts. I want to improve for personal reasons which include being able to get hired as a studio bassist in the future. As far as doing the work, I can do that. I met Victor and Anthony Wellington at a local bass clinic. Too very cool cats...both just regular guys. Thanks again! Peace...
     
  7. BluesWalker

    BluesWalker Supporting Member

    Jun 17, 2008
    San Diego, CA
    I went through the theory books. If you call Berklee Press, you can get the answer key to the problems. Having it was very helpful for my self-study work.
     
  8. Already In Use

    Already In Use

    Jan 3, 2010
    Right on! Thanks. I'm glad to have options.:bassist:
     
  9. Zootsuitbass

    Zootsuitbass Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2011
    I looked on Ebay,,, while I'm sure that's great,It's not what I had in mind.

    I don't know the differences but if anyone walks into the berklee book store you can buy the corse book and a "workbook".

    There is also a book called Music notation,,, while not exactly theory,, it's VERY good at getting your stuff together.
     
  10. Already In Use

    Already In Use

    Jan 3, 2010
    Ahhh. That's important to know. I'll have those books regardless in a week or two. Thank you very much. I'm good at self study and may have just saved quite a bit of money. We'll see. Peace..
     
  11. Already In Use

    Already In Use

    Jan 3, 2010
    More news. You can't do Berklee online with federal student aid. You have to pay or use their accepted loan source. Word is maybe 2014 fall semester they will be able to accept federal student aid(pell grants, etc) for online courses.
     
  12. MrLenny1

    MrLenny1

    Jan 17, 2009
    N.H.
    Check out some SKYPE lessons. A lot of guys are very reasonable
    and recent music grads.
    SNARF is here on TB for example.
     
  13. Zootsuitbass

    Zootsuitbass Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2011
    I study with Jeff Berlin via Skype 75 bucks a full 60 min. Tortuous and great
     
  14. Already In Use

    Already In Use

    Jan 3, 2010
    Here is my plan..or was...I wanted a formal course on theory to learn to read music. I have a good foundation in theory now. I tested into local music programs at our community colleges. My weakness is not being able to read. From there I wanted the jazz courses and bass specific courses from Berklee. I'm in 2 bands now so I need to be able to work this online. New plan...I will take theory classes locally, online and hope Berklee takes the federal funding on 2014 fall for their jazz course and other bass specific stuff. I'm working along with Scott Devine and Chris Tarry. Never really considered Skype before looking into this. Thanks! Peace.
     
  15. Dave W

    Dave W Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2007
    White Plains
    The thing is, theory courses aren't going to really teach you to read IME. They'll probably go over the notes of the grand staff quickly, but they're probably going to expect that you already know most of it.

    You're probably not going to sit down and do sight reading in a theory 101 class. You're going to learn about key signatures, intervals, triads, etc.
     
  16. Already In Use

    Already In Use

    Jan 3, 2010
    Berklee online says music 101 you will at the completion of T 101...

    I'm trying.:)
     
  17. Dave W

    Dave W Supporting Member

    Mar 1, 2007
    White Plains
    Sight reading and musical notation are two different things. Reading music in general and sight reading are similar but also different.

    The best way to learn sight reading IMO is practicing with your instrument. A theory course can certainly help make things a little easier, just don't expect to come away from it knowing how to sight read on your instrument.

    If it's anything like the theory courses I took you will learn the notes of the grand staff and learn where they are on a piano. They use a piano because it's easy enough for most students to learn and it somewhat universal. It also requires that you learn the two most used staffs, and most instruments use one or the other. That doesn't mean you'll sit down at a piano and try to read music though. It's just a basic foundation of the notes so you can learn keys, intervals, triads, scales, etc. and understand how they are all built. All excellent things to know that will certainly help you in the goals you listed.

    Of course, I didn't take this particular course so I can't say for sure what you will or will not learn. I have taken a few different theory courses though.

    It's kind of surprising to me that Berklee even offers a class like this, considering you need to audition for them and show that you have a good knowledge of your particular instrument to be accepted. I'd think you would need to know most of it just to get that far.
     
  18. Already In Use

    Already In Use

    Jan 3, 2010
    Great points. Thanks for sharing. Me? I guess I'm not the "typical" Berklee attendee. I'm over 50 looking to expand my knowledge and be a better bass player. I play with pros(of which I dont consider myself one), hence I am offered music that is sheet music. I have to make my own charts, record the band to practice tunes I need work on, etc..

    I'm surely not seeking a career at this point, just trying to improve and learn. Berklee online looked like a good choice.

    Your ending statement is so very true! Lots of work to be done on my part! I appreciate the advice and insight...peace.
     
  19. Zootsuitbass

    Zootsuitbass Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2011
    I believe you learn a lot about reading from writing. The work book keep referring to. You write a lot. From a page full of treble clefs through transposition of melodys.
     
  20. Already In Use

    Already In Use

    Jan 3, 2010
    Yes. Berklee Press said I can buy their books.
     

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