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best bass for reggae

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by beaumcrunner, Feb 1, 2005.


  1. beaumcrunner

    beaumcrunner

    Dec 24, 2004
    i am interested in purchasing my first bass guitar. i am a keyboard player and now i wanna try some reggae bass. any suggestions on what i should look for or does it not matter? i have been looking at rondomusic.com lately.
     
  2. Andre_gt7

    Andre_gt7

    Jan 4, 2005
    Atlanta - GA
    basses are very versatile instruments...you can play a big band gig one night and a rock gig the next, with the same bass IMHO...
     
    radicaldreamers and Perfessor like this.
  3. jive1

    jive1 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 16, 2003
    Alexandria,VA
    Owner/Retailer: Jive Sound
    For Reggae, you can't go wrong with a P-Bass strung with flats.
     
    btmpancake, Blankandson, R&B and 5 others like this.
  4. Brendan

    Brendan

    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    Ovation Magnum
    A Jazz
    A Precision

    Those are the three I hear come up most often.
     
    Perfessor likes this.
  5. beaumcrunner

    beaumcrunner

    Dec 24, 2004
    what is a p-bass? what are flats? i know nothing about this instrument that is why i am asking for some help, thanks!
     
  6. Brendan

    Brendan

    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
  7. P is for Precision

    J is for Jazz

    typical Fender fare.

    Flats are flatwound strings.
     
  8. jive1

    jive1 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 16, 2003
    Alexandria,VA
    Owner/Retailer: Jive Sound
    A P bass is a Fender Precision bass, or bass with a similar design.

    Flats are flatwound strings. They are different from the typical roundwounds that most basses have. They have a smoother feel, and have a warmer,darker sound.
     
  9. Brendan

    Brendan

    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    Faster'n all y'all.
     
    ScarfFace and old spice like this.
  10. beaumcrunner

    beaumcrunner

    Dec 24, 2004
  11. Brendan

    Brendan

    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    Spiffy. They're (Rondo) considerd the best bang for your buck as far as first/entry level basses go.
     
  12. jvbjr

    jvbjr

    Jan 8, 2005
    One that is cheap so you have plenty of money left for buying pot. :bag:
     
    BazzTard and adi77 like this.
  13. beaumcrunner

    beaumcrunner

    Dec 24, 2004
    not arguing with that!!!!
     
  14. Dr. Cheese

    Dr. Cheese Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 3, 2004
    Metro St. Louis
    Since you know nothing about bass, just look for a comfortable instrument and getting to practicing. Any good bass should be fine for reggae.
     
  15. AlembicBob

    AlembicBob

    Dec 28, 2004
    MA, US
    I would put the requirements for a Reggae bass among the easiest to fulfill. If this is the only style you care about, then just about any instrument will work. If pressed, the closest thing I can think of to a wrong over-the-counter factory bass for it would be a Rickenbacker.

    If you intend to actually perform, you will have to pay more attention to your amplification. The traditional Reggae tone favors the lower frequency range of the bass. You'll want a lot of power to produce those frequencies well.

    People have recommended flatwound strings, but I don't use those. Mostly, it's because I need to be more versatile. I would stick with nickel wound strings as opposed to steel, though, and the hex core as opposed to the round core. With this setup, you should be able to use EQ to get a good Reggae tone while still being able to cover other styles.

    Good luck!
    -Bob
     
  16. BartmanPDX

    BartmanPDX Supporting Member

    For reggae, I personally like the sound of a Fender Jazz bass, with the bridge pickup virtually off, and the neck pickup all the way on. That setup gives you the classic "Aston Barrett" sound on the Bob Marley albums -- very little bite, lots of full bottom end. I used to be in a reggae band in college, and got a great sound out of my Ric by turning up the volume on the neck pickup. :D

    You can get a jazz bass cheap, and they're good for a wide range of styles due to the two-pickup design, but there's nothing wrong with a P-bass, either!
     
    RaggaDruida and Jah Wobble Fan like this.
  17. beaumcrunner

    beaumcrunner

    Dec 24, 2004
    thanks for the advice. aton barret was certainly the man. does the bass i picked out have theses pickups that were mentioned?
     
  18. beaumcrunner

    beaumcrunner

    Dec 24, 2004
    :smug: sorry i meant aston barret
     
  19. Mojo-Man

    Mojo-Man Supporting Member

    Feb 11, 2003
    :cool:
    P-bass with Flats
    Try a Lakland Hollowbody bass- with flats
     
  20. BartmanPDX

    BartmanPDX Supporting Member

    The bass you linked to is a cross between a Precision bass and a Jazz bass. It has a jazz bass pickup towards the bridge (bottom), which provides a more punchy high end (try strumming any instrument towards the bridge, then towards the neck, and you'll see the difference). That pickup won't help you get a classic Reggae bottom end sound, though it will cut through well in a Rock mix. The P-bass split-coil pickup towards the bridge will get you more low end. I believe Aston Barrett played a Precision bass when he played with Bob Marley. So you could use this bass for reggae, just pan to the P-bass pickup, and cut the treble.

    You'll be able to get a decent reggae tone out of many basses, just cut the treble and fatten out the bottom end. True jazz-style basses can make it a little easier, since one of the pickups is close to the neck, where the really fat tones are to be found, but any Fender-type bass should work fine.

    And yes, flatwound strings are definitely the way to go for Reggae. Roundwounds will have too much zing and punch.