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Best drum machine

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Yamarc, Jun 15, 2004.


  1. Yamarc

    Yamarc Supporting Member

    Jun 25, 2002
    Northville, MI
    Which one do you recommend and why? Thanks, Marc
     
  2. tplyons

    tplyons

    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    Not really an effect, so I'll bump it to misc.

    BTW: I like the Yamaha RX-15. It sounds like junk from the eighties because it is, but it's really easy to program.
     
  3. jive1

    jive1 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 16, 2003
    Alexandria,VA
    Owner/Retailer: Jive Sound
    Alesis SR-16 in terms of programming capabilities, MIDI functions, and features. It's a standard.

    The Zoom RT123 is a great budget drum machine, and the sounds on it are awesome. Alot of nice presets, and very easy to program. You lose a little in features (especially MIDI), but it's still a very usable drum box.

    If you have the $$, an AKAI MPC is a fabulous box.
     
  4. David Wilson

    David Wilson Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Lower Westchester, NY
    Alesis sr16 for me also. I know there must be better machines that have come along in the last 13 or so years, but it's what I'm used to and I love it.
     
  5. kobass

    kobass Supporting Member

    Nov 3, 2003
    Outside Boston
    +1 for the Alesis SR-16.
     
  6. Does anyone use one of the Yamaha "QY" series sequencers as a drum machine?
    The older models (e.g. QY10, QY20) are available on ebay at fairly reasonable prices.
     
  7. David Wilson

    David Wilson Administrator Staff Member Administrator Supporting Member

    Oct 14, 2002
    Lower Westchester, NY
    The drum sounds on those are ok. But they're great little sequencers for what I needed them for (idea jotting etc). I used both the QY10 and QY20 to trigger the SR16 to get some better drum sounds.
     
  8. jive1

    jive1 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 16, 2003
    Alexandria,VA
    Owner/Retailer: Jive Sound
    I used to own a QY10. It's OK. It can be a little Casio-Like in it's sounds. But, it makes a for a workable sequencer/groove/drum box for a cheap price. I sold mine on E-bay for about $70. If all you want is a drum machine, I would recommend the Zoom MRT-3 which you can get for around the same price used. I like the sounds on the MRT3 better than the SR-16, but the features on the SR-16 (especially MIDI) are much better for about $20-$40 more on the used market. But if you want more features like built in synthesis, the ability program drum and accompaniment patterns, and sequence and store MIDI songs, the QY10 is not a bad option for the price. If you're not hung up on "realistic" sounds, it's a workable solution.

    I've heard that the QY20 is much better in terms of features and price.
     
  9. BertBert

    BertBert

    Nov 9, 2002
    Indianapolis
    Hey jive1 (or anybody else) -- I know nothing about MIDI and am just looking for a simple drum machine for practice purposes, maybe some very simple home recording at some point in the future. Do you think the zoom rt-123 is adequate for those purposes? Or will I be wishing I spent the extra money and got an alesis?
     
  10. jive1

    jive1 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 16, 2003
    Alexandria,VA
    Owner/Retailer: Jive Sound
    Well I have a Zoom MRT-3 and an Alesis SR-16. Here's my thoughts.

    The biggest advantage the Alesis will have over the Zoom will be in the MIDI department. The Zoom doesn't have a MIDI out, so you can't use it to control other MIDI devices or dump drum machine patterns to a sequencer or computer. The Alesis also has an input for a footswitch controller, which is really good for people who use a drum machine for a live show. It also has 2 sets of stereo outs, as opposed to only one on the Zoom. The Alesis has a little more programming and editing features as well.

    The Zoom does have a MIDI in, so you can control the box through a MIDI device. The Zoom is real easy to program. I was programming cool beats within minutes of getting mine. The Alesis has more pads available to do real time programming, but the 7 on the Zoom are plenty. Both boxes have touch sensitive pads, which is a good thing. The Zoom has more presets than the Alesis. My MRT-3 has something like 200 presets, whereas the Alesis SR-16 only has 50. I prefer the sounds on the Zoom over the Alesis. The Zoom sounds more realistic, whereas the Alesis has too many drums sounds that have that 80's wet with reverb tone to it. Don't get me wrong, in terms of features and functions the SR-16 is more robust than the Zoom. The SR-16 sounds good, but the Zoom sounds better.

    If all you want is a good sounding, easy to program drum machine for practice and laying down tracks, without the extra MIDI bells and whistles, the Zoom MRT-3 or Zoom RT123 is a great buy.
     
  11. Yamarc

    Yamarc Supporting Member

    Jun 25, 2002
    Northville, MI
    Jive1, Any benefits (besides size) to a Zoom MRT3 vs. a Zoom RT 123 or 234? Thanks, Marc
     
  12. jive1

    jive1 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jan 16, 2003
    Alexandria,VA
    Owner/Retailer: Jive Sound
    The only real difference I am aware of between the RT123 and the MRT-3 is that the RT123 and 234 have what is known as groove play mode. Where you can assign a pad to specific pattern, and you can play multiple patterns by hitting the pads. I know the 234 has more sounds, or patterns and maybe some features. I don't know much about the 234 so I'm not much help there.