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Best new double Bass maker.....?

Discussion in 'Basses [DB]' started by guadanini, Dec 6, 2005.


  1. guadanini

    guadanini

    Nov 29, 2005
    Which are the best Double Basses that contemporary Makers are Building?

    I like Poellman, T.Martin, Krachtemacher... Which you prefer...?
     
  2. KSB - Ken Smith

    KSB - Ken Smith Banned Commercial User

    Mar 1, 2002
    Perkasie, PA USA
    Owner: Ken Smith Basses, Ltd.
    First, your Profile doesn't tell us much about you. You are a 'Male' and you can teach the Double Bass! So, how many people have signed up with you from your Profile so far? Booked up yet?.. lol.. Just kidding.

    Looks like you are in Europe somewhere from your choices. There are some great builders here in USA. I have compared a Thomas Martin to an Arnold Schnitzer recently and liked Arnolds Bass better. Price was similar. I have not played a Pollmann yet that had nearly as good a tone but there were older one and not from the Krahmer Bros, just the Dad.
     
  3. Ben Rose

    Ben Rose

    Jan 12, 2004
    Oakland
    Wow. That really makes me want to check out one of Arnold's basses. I remember Thomas Martin's bass as being head and shoulders above the other basses I played at Hammond Ashley a few years ago.
     
  4. KSB - Ken Smith

    KSB - Ken Smith Banned Commercial User

    Mar 1, 2002
    Perkasie, PA USA
    Owner: Ken Smith Basses, Ltd.
    Yes, I played Arnolds Montagnana 3/4 model and I suprised how mature it sounded. Arnold also has a Tom Martin Bass for sale and that's the only one of Tom's I played. I don't know the exact model but it is very nice as well.
     
  5. jmpiwonka

    jmpiwonka

    Jun 11, 2002
    I have heard good things about the basses made by KCstrings.
     
  6. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    And Nick and Jeff; there seems to be a LOT of really great makers around.

    I think that "best" starts to be something of a misnomer; once you reach a certain level there are just things that speak to you in one instrument over another. It's not an objective goalpost.
     
  7. Tbeers

    Tbeers

    Mar 27, 2005
    Chicago, IL
    Who's that guy in Canada who made the elephant-head scroll bass? His work looks very impressive.

    Arnold Schnitzer's instruments are worth their volume in gold (they don't really weigh that much, so I think volume is better).

    I played a 5-string Pollmann that belonged at the time to Volkan Orhon and I wasn't amazed.
     
  8. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Is that the guy that did Gary Karr's bass with the scroll that's a bust of Gary? And the adjustable neck?

    JP seems to like his Pollman, but I've played about 4 different ones and they all sound kinda thin and nasally.
     
  9. Ben Rose

    Ben Rose

    Jan 12, 2004
    Oakland
    da Bears:The elephant bass was built by Mario Lamarre. Very kind fellow. Check out the 2003 dragon bass.

    The Pollman Alexandria model makes me sweat. I haven't heard it, but that picture in DoubleBassist taunts me.

    Still, I need to spend less time pining over gear and more time in the shed. At this point, I can still make the most wonderful bass sound terrible. :meh:
     
  10. The guy that made Karr's bass on his web page is Brock Radelet. I read an interview with Gary talking about that bass and he sayed that when he plays concerts with it many of the listeners are fooled by its sound into believing it's his Amanti. Never played or even hear one for that matter but many people love them and the guy has over a 2 year waiting list from what I hear.
     
  11. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Naw, different bass. This guy's name is Ham Something...
     
  12. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    Ham Bone............actually Jim Hamm
    Apparently Karr has a penchant for new makers.
     
  13. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    mmmm, ham...
     
  14. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    C'mon Ed, I think Jimi is clearly better than Bird and in fact you shouldn't even listen to Bird's music.
     
  15. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    I can't really hear it, does that count?
     
  16. Ben Rose

    Ben Rose

    Jan 12, 2004
    Oakland
    That Bird guy sounds like he's just making stuff up as he goes along. ;)

    I got to play a LowNote's Hachez bass on a set break at the Money Tree once. Sigh.
     
  17. TeHarr

    TeHarr

    Nov 8, 2005
    Winnipeg
    All the Pollman's I've tried have been much too expensive for their sound and feel.
     
  18. Jeff Bollbach

    Jeff Bollbach Jeff Bollbach Luthier, Inc.

    Dec 12, 2001
    freeport, ny
    Now now, you're showing your age. :scowl:
     
  19. KSB - Ken Smith

    KSB - Ken Smith Banned Commercial User

    Mar 1, 2002
    Perkasie, PA USA
    Owner: Ken Smith Basses, Ltd.
    I don't agree with that at all. I used a Pollmann 1977 5-string last year in a few concerts and it was not course or toneless at all. It had a huge sound actually. The only thing was it was not the type of sound I was looking for. I have heard great things about the new Basses they are making now. It just has to be for you, that's all..
     
  20. Tbeers

    Tbeers

    Mar 27, 2005
    Chicago, IL
    My impression of the Pollmann 5-string was that it just did not put out very much sound. Especially the E string was a big disappointment.

    But this is coming from a person who won't even put an extension on his bass. I think adding range to a DB, regardless of how you do it, takes a lot of oomph out of the sound. Especially noticeable when playing pizz. I've never felt comfy walking a line on an instrument that had an extension. The bone-rattling growl on the bottom is missing.