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Best strings for studio tone?

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by Domino, Feb 21, 2001.


  1. Domino

    Domino

    Dec 5, 2000
    Just curious if anyone changes their strings to bright flats or flatwounds for studio tone? I'm struggling to get a good tone in the studio.

    Also, how do Warwick black label compare against DAddario?
     
  2. JimmyThePlumberMan

    JimmyThePlumberMan

    Feb 4, 2001
    Besides being in the wrong forum, id say try a set of D'addario Slowounds. Great nickel strings, and id imagine they sound killer in the studio.
     
  3. Domino

    Domino

    Dec 5, 2000
    Anyone else have any suggestions?
     
  4. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    New (Pyramid Pyrasound) stainless steels for me, I've never ever played flatwounds - and I hope I'll never have to...

    Do you have difficulties with your tone or with fret noise?
     
  5. Domino

    Domino

    Dec 5, 2000
    A little bit of fret noise when tuned down on some songs, it's more a problem with the overall tone.
     
  6. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    I hard to recommend anything as you don't describe what's actually wrong with your tone. Is it lacking bass, mids or treble? Too much or not enough punch? Is it the timbre you don't like?

    What bass do you play? What's the studio environment?

    More info is needed.
     
  7. Domino

    Domino

    Dec 5, 2000
    JMX, thanks for your post - sorry I was not more specific. I'm a rookie at studio stuff...

    The problem I'm having seems to be a bit weird. Through my ampeg 350 watt 1x15+2x10+horn rig, I get awesome tone out of this bass. It's a brand new Warwick Corvette Proline with Warwick Black Label medium strings. It sounds awesome through the rig. But in the studio we went direct out from the back of the amp head to through some device (not sure what) that the sound engineer hooked up to the board. It just sounded like crap. There was absolutely no warwick 'growl' or 'sound of wood'. It sounded tin-like with little low end, too-high mids (even though the mids were turned way down on the EQ), and it picked up every stinking little thing on the high end (finger noise, fret buzz, other strings buzzing, etc. - all of which I didn't hear when playing through my rig). It's a weird problem, as I said. It could be my playing style as I've only been playing about 2 years and am definetely not a 'tone-god'. Someday I'll get there. Probably had a little too much punch. The studio environment is basically one nice insullated room with the sound engineer in another room (check out http://www.studiozrecordings.com for pictures and stuff.) Anyways, that's a pretty good description, let me know if you want more info.
     
  8. rickbass

    rickbass Supporting Member

    Sounds like the engineer might have put you through a guitar DI unit or just a crappy DI.
     
  9. Domino

    Domino

    Dec 5, 2000
    Are there distinct differences between a guitar DI and a bass DI? Are studio's supposed to use separate boxes for guitars/basses?
     
  10. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    Different DIs for guitar or Bass are quite recent developments, and usually offer a sound modeled to mimic bass or guitar amps, like the Sansamp Bass DI (trying to emulate a Ampeg SVT).

    More crucial are differences between passive and active DI boxes, active ones usually are preferable, due to better bandwith and overall sound quality, tube DIs are worth checking out too, if available.

    You might try going straight into the DI with your bass, perhaps the Ampeg just doesn't handle DI well.
     
  11. Sounds like the engineer is not up with it. The best sounds for recording come from using 3 tracks. One is an external DI, not the one in back of your amp. the second is a mic on your 15" speaker, and the third is a mic on your other speakers. These three tracks are then blended in whatever combination sounds best, (maybe a bit of all of them). If you are recording "live", your amp should be isolated in another room. Even if you are doing one instrument at a time, you can sometimes get better bass sound by trying different rooms. I did a session once where the drummer got the best sound for his kit by having it in the kitchen at the studio. Thereafter, the engineer always set drummers up in that room. Just keep the food locked up!!
     
  12. eric atkinson

    eric atkinson "Is our children learning "Is our teachers teachin

    Feb 4, 2001
    Joplin,Missouri
    Hey man tell the damn recording guy to mic your speaker cab and also go throught the box! You can get some really great sounds what kind of cab do you have? I think a month ago bassplayer mag had a article about recording bass they said to mic your rig and go through a box! Tell this guy you are paying hes bills so do what you want!