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Best way to avoid buying a new bass?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by bad_andy, Aug 22, 2007.


  1. Get my old bass (or basses) set up and spit-shined

    38 vote(s)
    25.9%
  2. Try a new brand of strings

    39 vote(s)
    26.5%
  3. Try a new gauge of strings

    16 vote(s)
    10.9%
  4. Try a new effect on my old bass (or basses)

    10 vote(s)
    6.8%
  5. Upgrade my old pickups instead

    41 vote(s)
    27.9%
  6. Upgrade my old pre-amp instead

    21 vote(s)
    14.3%
  7. Upgrade my old hardware instead (bridge and/or tuners)

    17 vote(s)
    11.6%
  8. Upgrade my old bass's appearance (finish, chrome, etc.)

    16 vote(s)
    10.9%
  9. Get a better amp and/or cabinet instead

    25 vote(s)
    17.0%
  10. Get a instructional DVD or book instead

    7 vote(s)
    4.8%
  11. Spend more time playing my old one

    28 vote(s)
    19.0%
  12. Get a new teacher instead

    4 vote(s)
    2.7%
  13. Bargain with myself to "earn it" later by getting better

    16 vote(s)
    10.9%
  14. Start a savings account for this sort of thing

    15 vote(s)
    10.2%
  15. Give up and buy a guitar instead

    2 vote(s)
    1.4%
  16. Take up the drums

    3 vote(s)
    2.0%
  17. Get a new girlfriend (or boyfriend) instead

    15 vote(s)
    10.2%
  18. Spend my midlife crisis the usual way (cars, women, divorce)

    10 vote(s)
    6.8%
  19. Actually deal with whatever has gone wrong with my life

    22 vote(s)
    15.0%
  20. (All together now...) Carrots

    28 vote(s)
    19.0%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. bad_andy

    bad_andy

    Sep 21, 2005
    Omaha, NE
    I was mulling this over after reading the thread about wanting a bass you can't afford... What's the best way you've found to get mileage out of your existing gear instead of spending money you don't have on a new bass you really don't need?

    For me it's got to be giving one of my current instruments the royal treatment at the local repair shop... new strings, brand new setup, any minor repairs or maintenance taken care of, etc. It's like getting a new bass for a fraction of the cost. What's your way of coping/snapping out of it?
     
  2. BobWestbrook

    BobWestbrook Mr. Supporting Member

    Mar 13, 2006
    Philly suburb
    Stay off Talkbass :)
     
  3. stop playing bass
     
  4. pogipoints

    pogipoints Custom User Title Holder

    Dec 5, 2005
    Atlanta
    I agree, new strings and a setup always help :)

    I list down ALL the things I "really" want to buy, and set priorities. Most of the time I conclude that a new bass isn't a priority for me...
    Or I plug in one of my own basses and realize that I already get the sound I want from them.

    Sometimes I just break down and say, what the hell... I'll buy it :)
     
  5. bad_andy

    bad_andy

    Sep 21, 2005
    Omaha, NE
    ...aaaand here's the poll.
     
  6. NKUSigEp

    NKUSigEp

    Jun 6, 2006
    Bright, IN
    + 4 billion!

    And like you said, giving my bass the royal treatment though if ya learn to do it yourself, it's a little more cost-effecient. And maybe instead of upgrading to a new bass, try out some new pickups or a new effect pedal.
     
  7. Chriso21

    Chriso21 Supporting Member

    Jan 15, 2006
    Fort Worth Texas
    the more I bass -especially in a regular daily routine band situation that 'fuels my musical fire', the less mojo I have for talkbass and looking into other basses.
     
  8. steve21

    steve21 Banned

    + a million
     
  9. thats the first thing I thought when I saw the thread title :D

    new setup, new strings, maybe try out some other basses - when I do this I find out that I like my bass more than others I try.

    and a big thing for me is to realize that for my playing ability (intermidiate) and how much I play (only in my room or sunday mornings at church), I have more than plenty.
     
  10. DeanT

    DeanT Send lawyers, guns and money...

    The easiest way I've found to avoid buying a new bass is to tell my wife about it beforehand. She gives me so much $%^@# about it that I give the idea up just to keep the peace.
     
  11. i'm really digging the extensive...ness...of the poll, can't wait to see how it turns out after a couple days.:D
     
  12. Get an addictive drug habbit. Works every time.
     
  13. msquared

    msquared

    Sep 19, 2004
    Kansas City
    Totally. I've been really happy with every bass I've purchased or sold via Talkbass but so much stuff comes through that is easily flippable that it's easy to justify buying stuff and getting rid of something else to fund it.

    That said, one of the best reasons for keeping a bass is that you can typically update electronics and other things and totally change the way it sounds through an amp. I've done that a couple times now and hanging out here has shown me a lot of really good pickup and preamp upgrades that I wouldn't have seen otherwise.
     
  14. Pilgrim

    Pilgrim Supporting Member

    Answer: buy a used bass.
     
  15. I'd rather buy more gear...
     
  16. lowphatbass

    lowphatbass **** Supporting Member

    Feb 25, 2005
    west coast
    Try to avoid buying basses without playing them before hand.
    I see so many "winner" basses for sale where the seller's reasons are, "I'm just not playing it enough so I can't justify owning it anymore", or "this bass is special and deserves to be played". If it was that much of ringer then why are they selling it?
    I also think a lot less experienced players are chasing the "tone dragon" and mistakingly think it's all about the bass....buy, sell, buy, sell. When young players, their parents, or adults who want to play bass approach me about equipment I tell them the following:

    Get a entry level Fender, SX or OLP. Plan on having it for a year or so, this will give you time to figure out what your into and make sure you even like playing the bass. At that point you will a LOT more about yourself as a bassist(as apposed to NOTHING). Often times new players will be enrolled in music classes which will turn them on to different styles of music and their needs will change. Now go out and get a $500-$1000 bass(depending on budget), but DON'T sell your first bass because it's worth more to you than what you can get for it, especially on trade! At this point you should be set for the next 3 or 4 years, at that point you will be out of high school/college, have some years under your belt, two basses and a smile.

    I just realized this was a rant, I apologize but I do feel better.
     
  17. rjny36

    rjny36

    Jan 29, 2006
    Syracuse, NY
    I had to chuckle at the "Actually deal with whatever has gone wrong with my life" option. Had to pick that, due to its excellence and originality as an option. :)
     
  18. lbanks

    lbanks

    Jul 17, 2003
    Ennui, IN USA
    This is the best way.:bawl:
     
  19. fenderhutz

    fenderhutz Supporting Member

    Jan 28, 2007
    Harpers Ferry WV
    Buy a Jazz Bass and your done. :)
     
  20. I'm sorry, but the poll is too long to read. I'll just say "yes" but only if it's less than $750...










    And in a month without an "r".
     

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