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Best Way to Record onto the Computer

Discussion in 'Recording Gear and Equipment [BG]' started by pApAShAfT, Mar 20, 2003.


  1. pApAShAfT

    pApAShAfT

    Feb 10, 2003
    Cali
    so what is the best way to record onto your computer? i know that you can buy an adapter and hook up the bass to the sound card, but that isnt of the greatest quality. what is better than that? i also have a multi-effects floor unit that has midi out/in hookups, is there a way that i can use this for recording?
    thanks
     
  2. Get a good recording soundcard, if you only need 2 channels it will be easy to get one fairly cheap (it should have 24bit/96khz sampling or better), if you need more channels it will cost more
     
  3. This is my path so far with computer recording:

    I started out with a SoundBlaster Audigy soundcard that supports zero latency. The card won't work right for you if it doens't support zero latency! The Audigy is a cheap card (~$200) and most Windows recording software will work with it. Neundo was my software of choice. That was good for awhile.

    For me to professionally synch up with my area studios, I recently upgraded to a Mac G4 with an MBox, ProTools 6, and a Glyph 80GB drive (investment ~$2000). Now I can record my bass parts against a scratch mix provided by the studio and upload them to the studio! All without leaving my basement. :bassist:

    Just as you'd use your effects in an actual studio, you would run them inline in your home studio. I think you'll find most recording software to have effects that greatly surpass the quality of any stomp box. I use a direct signal into an Aphex 204, then into the CPU.
     
  4. Personally I would stay away from SoundBlaster cards for recording, they are usualy not very good at it (Terratec sells a 6 channel recording card which is quite good for an acceptable price, i'd have to check the exact price, but it should be <$400)
     
  5. PollyBass

    PollyBass ******

    Jun 25, 2001
    Shreveport, LA
    Word. stay AWAY from CL cards. horrible stuff. Look into M-Audio, or many other cards. Not that stupid audigy.
     
  6. Johnalex

    Johnalex

    Jul 20, 2001
    South Carolina
    DO NOT BUY AUDIGY!.....whatever you do do not buy it. I have a M-Audio Audiophile 24/96 and it is awesome. Latency is pretty freaking low, due to the ASIO drivers. I think my next step will be a Delta 1010 .
     
  7. Steve Lawson

    Steve Lawson Solo Bass Exploration! Supporting Member

    Apr 21, 2000
    Birmingham, UK
    I recently replaced my SoundBlaster Platinum Live with an M-Audio Delta 44, which is great - very high quality AD/DA conversion, up to 24/96 recording, very easy to set up and use. I've kept the soundblaster card because it interacts well with my TV card, and has a MIDI port that I can use as well, but for all 'proper' audio functions, I'm using my Delta Card.

    if you're looking for something to record onto, you could do a lot worse than Fruity Studio - the new version of Fruity Loops that now supports audio recording as well... very nice, and rather cheap ($150 I think)...

    well worth checking out

    Steve
    www.steve-lawson.co.uk
     
  8. pApAShAfT

    pApAShAfT

    Feb 10, 2003
    Cali
    aight cool, thnx for the help.
    i was wondering, how do the differente channels help you? like, what is the difference between a soundcard w/2 channels vs a soundcard w/6 channels?

    thanks for your help.
    also, i have a laptop, so they still have these sound cards for a laptop, right?
     
  9. Johnalex

    Johnalex

    Jul 20, 2001
    South Carolina

    :eek: ...you should of said that from the begining! No these cards won't work with a laptop. These cards are PCI..laptops don't have PCI slots. Your best bet is to buy a desktop, or get a USB soundcard. M-audio makes a USB version of the Audiophile 24/96
     
  10. For god's sake guys. The Audigy is not that bad for someone just starting out on a budget. I wouldn't say it was an *optimum* solution ...

    For a laptop? MBox.
     
  11. Johnalex

    Johnalex

    Jul 20, 2001
    South Carolina
    I was on a budget. I paid $200 for a Audigy Platinum EX less then a year ago. I tought it was 24 bit...it was'nt. I thought it would be ocmpatible with my XP at the time....it was'nt. I thought that the company would give me customer support....the did'nt.

    I bought a M-audio 25/96...instaled it and it worked right away. In 24 bit, compatible with XP, and full costumer support.....ohh I paid $50 less then what I did for the Audigy.
     
  12. PollyBass

    PollyBass ******

    Jun 25, 2001
    Shreveport, LA
    BooYah.
     
  13. rygelxvi

    rygelxvi

    Jan 6, 2003
    MOTU and MACs the only way to go IMHO
     
  14. pApAShAfT - There are a ton of different options.

    But to answer one or two of your specific questions. You can record directly into your laptop through the input ("line in" or "mic input" depending on whether you are using a signal booster - your amp and effects unit will boost the signal so be careful not to overload the system by recording using the mic input) on your soundcard via the 1/4" to 1/8" adaptor. You will get some latency (a gap between what you play and what you hear through the soundcard) but you can turn off the sound through the laptop so you just hear yourself normally i.e. through your amp. Really cheap soundcards have bad latency. Really good ones have virtually none.

    6 channels versus 4 (or two or one). This can either refer to the number of simultaneous inputs/outputs or in some cases this is used where they are talking about surround sound (5 satellite speakers and one subwoofer). If you are recording bass on your own, then you will probably not need more than two simultaneous recording channels.

    For a laptop you can use USB soundcards and interfaces to plug your sound from your bass to your PC. Bear in mind though that they MAY have latency issues depending on whether they have more modern USB2 (faster) interfaces or plain old USB1.

    There are some really good articles on PC recording at Sound on Sound magazine www.sospubs.co.uk. Try also www.computermusic.co.uk. They have pretty friendly advice for newbies.
     
  15. pApAShAfT

    pApAShAfT

    Feb 10, 2003
    Cali
    thanks a lot for your help. i think i will purchase the Aardvark USB3 to record onto my laptop, it sounds like the ideal solution to my recording problem at a reasonable price. if anyone has any comments on this product i would love to hear them, thank you.
     
  16. jasonbraatz

    jasonbraatz

    Oct 18, 2000
    Oakland, CA
    if you have firewire this will be the way to go!!


    [​IMG]

    i have the PCI based Delta66/OmniStudio setup on my computer, but that's without the midi and optical ins and outs.

    unfortunately, it keeps getting pushed back for release. now MF says june 1. :(
     
  17. rygelxvi

    rygelxvi

    Jan 6, 2003
    The only limitation to the 410 is it only has 2 anolog inputs. They can be linked however which is nice. The presonus firestation is the best firewire interface i've seen yet. MMMMMM mlan. But the firestation does have problems with OSX, but that will probably be fixed before the 410 comes out.
     
  18. jasonbraatz

    jasonbraatz

    Oct 18, 2000
    Oakland, CA
    it has two PAIR. a pair with mic pres and a pair of line level.
     
  19. Johnalex

    Johnalex

    Jul 20, 2001
    South Carolina
    that is a good looking interface. What will the price be..anyone know?.
     
  20. I don't mean to hijack the thread here, but I'm starting to put together a new computer specifically for recording and the M-Audio cards are intriguing. I'm wanting something that can really handle everything thrown at it. Should I wait on that (GORGEOUS) Firewire M-Audio card or is there one out already that can do the trick? Thanks!