Better for funk/punk/reggae/rock/jazz --> StingRay or Jazz Bass?

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by dmaki, Dec 13, 2000.

  1. dmaki


    Apr 29, 2000
    I'm looking into getting a new bass. I don't know whether I should buy one or make one. It would only be my second bass, so I think I should probably buy a decent one to replace my Ibanez GSR 200 with EMG's instead of possibly botching up one that I build myself out of parts. I've kind of narrowed what I want down to a Jazz Bass and a Stingray. I want something that would be good for funk, punk, reggae, rock, and jazz. Most importantly reggae, rock, and funk. What do you think is better suited?

  2. Rockinjc


    Dec 17, 1999
    How do they feel in your hands?
  3. Dmaki,
    I would go with the Fender Jazz Deluxe (US) Bass. It offers
    more tone options than the Stingray. Not only the circuitry but how it respondes when you attack the strings in different areas. The Stingray has a great tone but (the stock electronics) are not tonally diverse. I've owned both.
  4. Zon's right, the Jazz bass is definitely more flexible. I have both, and the Stingray really is pretty much a one tone axe. If you're like me and it's that dream tone you've always wanted, then look no further. It's great for rock, but if you want reggae and jazz tones your gonna need the versatility of a Jazz Bass. :)
  5. For funk, punk and rock, you're going to have a hard time beating the Stingray. BUT if you're going to play all those other styles the Jazz will suit you better.
  6. Borderline


    Oct 30, 2000
    I'll throw my voice into the chorus with both Zon and Stingray... for flexibility over a number of genres, you just can't beat a jazz bass, especially the American Deluxe.
    Its tonal variety is nearly unmatched, in my opinion. While the Stingray is an excellent instrument, it can't beat the Jazz for crossing a number of diffrent styles.
  7. Monkey

    Monkey Supporting Member

    Mar 8, 2000
    Dayton, Ohio, USA
    As far as reggae is concerned, the Jazz bass is considered classic. Aston "Family Man" Barrett, bassist and musical director for Bob Marley, mostly played a Jazz. I like the tone of a Stingray, but I get frustrated with a one-tone axe, even if the tone is great.
  8. Starrchild


    Nov 10, 2000
    The Bay.
    why don't you get both a lakland.talkin about tone you'll
    thank me.
  9. CS


    Dec 11, 1999
    As good as Laklands are you can buy a Stingray and a Jazz for the same money.:)

    The Stingray will do reggae but Jazz ? Play both through your amp system and see what you like. As John (jc) pointed out feel will be a factor (the necks are completely different).

  10. rooster


    Jun 10, 2000
    upstate new york
    hey guys:
    why not try the g&l asat or the L2000 talk about verstility.i started a thread on why not the G&L?like i was saying i have a stingray the anniversary model great bass what a sound.but then i tried a G&L much more tone.dont get me wrong i wouldnt sell my stingray but he asat blows the ray away !!!!!!as for the jazz bass again you are tying yourself down to one sound a great sound but again one.some people love this some love the G&L whatever is right for asat has the jazz neck.1.5 at the nut the ray 1 5/8 at the nut.not as wide as the precision and i owned one of those to.some people say the the G&L trys to cop the sounds of the other guitars and they dont have there own signature sound.but just being able to do this puts them in a class of there own.because if they dont sound exactly like the (p)bass or the jazz bass.doesnt that make them have there own sound?anyway im rambling.thanks for listening.

    and remember as always rock till ya drop!!!!!!
  11. You could rout out the bridge pickup hole on the Jazz Bass and put in a Stingray-type humbucker, then you'd have the best of both worlds. Also, for the price of a MM Stingray, you could get a top-of-the-line Carvin with a single-coil and an Alcino Humbucer. It seems like most people really like their Carvins.