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blank sheet music?

Discussion in 'Tablature and Notation [BG]' started by Frugle, Oct 11, 2005.


  1. Frugle

    Frugle

    Sep 4, 2005
    Atlanta GA
    Does anyone know where I could get a page of blank sheet music so that I could print it out and write out some songs I'd like to keep?

    one like this, just blank.

    thanks!

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Frugle

    Frugle

    Sep 4, 2005
    Atlanta GA
    I didn't think to type in "Blank sheet music" into google until I made this thread, I was typing in stuff like "Music sheets".

    anyways, I found it here: www.blanksheetmusic.net

    pretty cool site..
     
  3. fraublugher

    fraublugher

    Nov 19, 2004
    ottawa, ontario, canada
    music school retailer
    i just photocopy cuz im also frugle ;)
     
  4. Frugle

    Frugle

    Sep 4, 2005
    Atlanta GA
    lol, yeah, that's what I had to do.. that one didn't have bar lines, so I saved it, photoshopped it to have bars, and then copied a few of them.

    if someone has a minute... could someone explain the D.C. all fine, and D.C. coda thing, and how to transfer it to staff sheets?

    I know D.C. all Fine means go to the beginning and D.C. all coda means go to a cetain point... but I don't know how to put that on the paper.


    also, what happens if I have 16 bars of G... lol, can I put the repeat sign around 2 bars and then put x8 to the side? or repeat around 4 bars and put x4?
     
  5. Dan Knowlton

    Dan Knowlton Out of my mind, back in 5 minutes! Supporting Member

  6. Frugle

    Frugle

    Sep 4, 2005
    Atlanta GA
    does anyone know of one that is separated into bars?
     
  7. tplyons

    tplyons

    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    Is writing in your own lines that difficult? I mean, it's also easier IMO due to spacing.
     
  8. tplyons

    tplyons

    Apr 6, 2003
    Madison, NJ
    DC al Fine means go back to the head (top, beginning) and play until it says fine, meaning end.

    DC al Coda means go back to the head and play until you reach the coda symbol meaning jump to the coda. The coda is placed at teh end of the piece and is marked with that same coda symbol and usually the word Coda.

    As far as 16 bars of G, yes, either way would work.
     
  9. Frugle

    Frugle

    Sep 4, 2005
    Atlanta GA
    I'm not saying it's that difficult, I'm just a perfectionist, and I just wanted straight, prefectly even lines :).
     
  10. Frugle

    Frugle

    Sep 4, 2005
    Atlanta GA
    If I handed you this, would you be able to read it(it's in 6/8)?

    what is wrong with this?

    on the 5th line, would that be DC all coda? when you get to that point you repeat from the beginning twice, on the third time through you continue on...

    thanks :)
     

    Attached Files:

  11. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    Use a ruler or use a notation program. Are you planning on filling the notes in later? While it's a good principle to use the spacing to give some clue about the duration of the notes, slavish adherence to that idea can leave you're minims looking isolated and your semiquaver runs too bunched up. Predefined barlines take away your flexibility in giving things room to breathe.

    As far as "DC al coda" goes, I don't think that's what you need there. Instead, you need to mark alternative endings (see the third example from this page of the lilypond manual). The first and second time endings would repeat back to the top; the third time you reach that section, you carry on instead.

    "DC al Coda" would be used for a situation such as playing a bridge then jumping back to do the verse and chorus one more time before hitting the outro.

    Wulf
    Wulf
     
  12. Frugle

    Frugle

    Sep 4, 2005
    Atlanta GA
    I was going to ask a friend who knows what he's doing to help me fill in the things in the middle later... I don't know enough (yet) about reading music.

    thank you for your response! although I didn't really understand any of it... :bag:
     
  13. wulf

    wulf

    Apr 11, 2002
    Oxford, UK
    On the bar spacing, look at the line of the Birdland transcription that starts at bar 25. It is mainly whole notes (semibreves) and so the transcriber has used 8 bars on that line instead of 7 as in most of the rest of the piece. The whole notes still get a reasonable amount of space but it obviously wasn't fixed in advance.

    Wulf