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Bob Marley - live at the Rainbow

Discussion in 'Bassists [BG]' started by Para_Ebola, Aug 7, 2002.


  1. Para_Ebola

    Para_Ebola

    Jul 25, 2002
    Hi. a few nights ago i got to watch a recordng of Bob Marley live at the Rainbow on T.V.. Needless to say it was amazing.

    Does anyone know who played bass for Bob Marley?

    i never payed much attention to the bass playing in marely songs until watching that program.Great bass.
     
  2. Woodchuck

    Woodchuck

    Apr 21, 2000
    Atlanta / Macon (sigh)
    Gallien Krueger for the last 12 years!
    Aston "Family Man" Barret. He was killer!
     
  3. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Did you notice how often he avoided the one or the first beat of the measure? :D
     
  4. Para_Ebola

    Para_Ebola

    Jul 25, 2002
    despite marley songs being relatively uncomplicated in structure i found that the bassist's playing was highly unpredictable. every now and again i'd be like 'sweeeet. i didn't predict that!!'.
    wish they had focused a little bit more on him tho instead of bob and the lead guitarist(who were both really good too it must be said).
    anyone know what bass he played?
     
  5. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Fender Jazz.
     
  6. slam

    slam Guest

    Mar 22, 2000
    Virginia
    Come on Bruce, open your ears and listen.

    BTW Familyman still tours with the Wailers and he is still great.
     
  7. cassanova

    cassanova

    Sep 4, 2000
    Florida
    I did. Thats one thing I like about it. Gave my friends a copy of some Marley stuff to learn for my own personal reasons, and it struck me funny how the guitar would do the skanks on the wrong count and tell me i was outta time and throwing everyone off by not commin in on the one 1st beat.
     
  8. Monkey

    Monkey Supporting Member

    Mar 8, 2000
    Dayton, Ohio, USA
    Dropping the one is called a "one-drop", naturally. It also refers to a common reggae drum beat, where the bass and snare come in together on TWO and FOUR, and neither hit the one. Reggae is really simple music, but very hard to find people who can play it.

    Family Man is one of my all-time biggest influences on bass. I LOVE that guy. He is very melodic. Besides a Jazz, he also played a Yamaha sometimes, always with flatwounds, of course. If you like Family Man, you should check out one of his proteges, Robbie Shakespeare. He and his drummer, Sly Dunbar, have played with everybody from Peter Tosh to Mick Jagger to Bob Dylan.... Robbie learned a lot from Family Man, but his style is more rhythmic and a little "harder".

    BTW, Marley's drummer was Family Man's brother, Carlton, who was murdered I think about 10 years ago. Jamaica is a rough place.... Marley and his wife were both shot and survived, Tosh was murdered, Carlton was murdered....
     
  9. slam

    slam Guest

    Mar 22, 2000
    Virginia
    So Monkey, you count a one-drop as kick on two and four? I used to count it that way, but when I told my drummer that he looked at me like I was crazy and told me I was wrong.

    Upon reconsidering I have started to count it as kick on three with the one dropped. It also makes more sense to me that it is called a one drop when you count it that way.

    It really hit home to me that this was more correct when listening to a rockers beat (invented by Sly Dunbar) which has a four on the floor bass drum. The kick hits on the skank every time. When I noticed that a light went on in my head and I realized that the skank in reggae should be counted on the two and four and not on the upbeat like in ska.
     
  10. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    One of the best gigs I ever attended was Black Uhuru in Brighton in a hot summer. Sly and Robbie were great throughout and of course the crowd demanded an encore - but they came back just as bass and drums for about 20 minutes of Dub! It was incredible stuff, but it was amazing that a very large crowd were entirely happy - dancing away- with just bass and drums! After the gig, everybody was on a such a "high" that they all headed across the road and straight into the sea - I have never before or since, seen so many pale bare behinds glinting in the moonlight! ;)
     
  11. Monkey

    Monkey Supporting Member

    Mar 8, 2000
    Dayton, Ohio, USA
    Slam, that is so interesting. I always counted reggae as you mentioned, with the snare and bass drum hitting on three, and the skanks on two and four. I counted out a beat at a practice, and this Rasta I was playing with told me that was completely wrong, and that I was misinterpreting the beat. I find it much easier to count it as you said. I love playing a rocker's beat; we do a killer version of "Guess who's coming to dinner" by Black Uhuru with a rocker's beat.

    Bruce, one of my best concerts was Black Uhuru with Sly and Robbie in a Chicago nightclub. It doesn't sound nearly as cool as your experience, but Sly and Robbie just tore it up. Sly looked rather bored, but played great, while Robbie was dressed in black leather and sunglasses, never cracked a smile, and looked mean as hell. That was right after the album "Anthem" was released.
     
  12. Monkey

    Monkey Supporting Member

    Mar 8, 2000
    Dayton, Ohio, USA
    Slam, I dug up a Bob Marley songbook to see how they notated the rhythm, and they used both. Most seem to be written so the skanks come on the upbeats (Stir It Up, No Woman No Cry), but some are written so the skanks come in on 2 and 4 (Natural Mystic, Jammin'). I guess we were both right.
     
  13. slam

    slam Guest

    Mar 22, 2000
    Virginia
    Hey Monkey,

    Yeah I guess there is more than one way to count it. That is funny you got one rasta telling you one thing and I got another telling me another. It is so strange to me that nobody seems to really know the "correct" way to count a one drop. I guess each individual needs to pick a way and stick with it.

    Now Monkey I must ask your opinion on reggae bass not playing on the one. It seems to me that the bass plays on the one more often than not. What do you think? I know there are many famous riddims where the bass lays off the one for the whole song, such as Satta Massagana, Real Rock, Natural Mystic, but it seems to me that most of the reggae I listen to (generally classic roots and dub) has bass playing on the one. Any opinions?
     
  14. i have notcie it depeds on the song.some song they wont play on the one and some they do.
     
  15. slam

    slam Guest

    Mar 22, 2000
    Virginia
    AFAIK Bunny Wailer has never played bass.

    On a related note: did anyone watch the Trio cable TV channel's reggae weekend this past weekend (Aug 10 & 11) Saw a show called "Reggae Session" that had Bunny Wailer, Toots, Sly & Robbie and some other famous folks. Also a Peter Tosh concert ans The Harder They Come. What I saw was really nice. Anybody get it on video?
     
  16. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    For me - it is the characterstic sound of Reggae - sort of like the "classic" Reggae sound - if somebody asked me how to characterise the Reggae "feel" I would start with this.

    Of course Reggae has devloped over many years and players like Sly and Robbie bring in all sort of influnces from US music and others - so a lot of "Reggae" records you hear are very rock or R&B influenced.

    But the thing that Reggae brings to the mix, that isn't elsewhere, is that spacey, syncopated feel characterised by one drop and the bass avoiding the first beat of the measure - so the measure will go across the bar and break up the square feel that you would otherwise get.
     
  17. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Well I think this is wrong on all counts - I have seen Bunny Wailer leading his own band recently (last few years anyway) at festivals in the UK - great experience! But as far as I'm aware he just plays percussion and sings (chants?). He was a lot more into the religious experience at his concerts than anything I've seen from Bob Marley - maybe this was the split?
     
  18. slam

    slam Guest

    Mar 22, 2000
    Virginia
    It is true that Bunny stopped touring with the Wailers because he didnt like touring and the rigors that come with it. He was replaced by Joe Higgs, a singer who schooled the Wailers in their formative years. This lineup is documented live on the "Talking Blues" CD.

    For a long time Bunny never toured, but I think it was the mid-late 80's when he finally started touring. You are lucky to have seen him. The video I saw this weekend was very powerful and I can only imagine what it would be like to see him in person.

    I guess we are going to have to agree to disagree Bruce. I'm not saying that the bass never lays off the one in reggae, but from what Ive heard in my years of listening to reggae nearly every day, it is not as common as many people make it out to be. And it really only happens in the one drop beat, which is not the only reggae beat nowadays.
     
  19. Monkey

    Monkey Supporting Member

    Mar 8, 2000
    Dayton, Ohio, USA
    Slam, I agree with you; it seems most reggae parts do not drop the one. I think the overall sound and interplay of the parts makes it reggae more than any one beat or style. I must admit, though, that I'm sort of stuck in a reggae time-warp. I like the old stuff much better than most of the new stuff I hear. To me, classic reggae is Burning Spear, Marley, Toots, Tosh, Bunny, etc. Not that there isn't good stuff out there, but I just prefer the classics.

    One thing I always liked about Bob Marley's band was that is WAS a band, not just a bunch of thrown-together players. So much of reggae seems to be based around the front person, and whoever shows up to play behind them doesn't matter so much. I don't like those shows where there is a band and a bunch of frontmen (or women) all play over them. I like a band that has a distinct style and sound that has developed over time.

    Oh, and about the Rastas telling us different things... Being a white guy who plays reggae isn't always easy, and I've had Rastas tell me all kinds of crazy stuff. It has often seemed that my opinion didn't really count, me not being a Rasta or Rasta wannabe. Then again, I've had some great friendships with Rastas that I will always remember.
     
  20. sorry about the messup.like i thought he played bass with them.i never got in to learning who was who in the band.i just love the music.who did leave the band.i was wacthing some thing about bob marley on channle 2 and it said a couple of band members left the band not because they didnt want to tour ,but didnt want to tour out side of there home land.

    i know bunny and tosh left.i thought there bass player did to.

    on a side note in the new pot heads mag there a big wright up on his kids and his fammily.out of the 11 kids that are agreed to be his real kids 7 are in some way involed in music. guess it is in the dna.