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Boiling Elixers? + flatwound question

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by weeding, Nov 14, 2005.


  1. weeding

    weeding

    May 17, 2005
    Is it possible to boil them, or does the coating just come off and you end up with useless pieces of metal? I'm asking because the deilema is this;

    I have some Elixers that have been on my bass for ages (don't know how long exactly), they still sound fine and the coating hasn't started coming off yet. However, over summer (I live in Australia) I'll be playing far more than normal and I wont have easy access to new strings for approx. 2 months. So do I leave the Elixers and boil them (if that is possible) or do I go for new strings. I don't have the $$$ for another set, so I'm thinking about going for a pair of flatwounds (I generally play a mix of blues/jazz/rock) and I'm wondering what a good set would be for someone who is just trying them out, and not a commited flatwound player?? Thanks for any forthcoming advice and see my sig for rig (hehe, that rhymed).
     
  2. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    LaBellas and Fenders are good flats to get in your situation. You don't want to boil Elixirs, I wouldn't think. That red stuff will indeed come off. But if you want to stick with Elixirs, just get another set before you go just in case you break one, and if they still sound good by then, leave the old ones on.
     
  3. weeding

    weeding

    May 17, 2005
    That's JimmyM. I can't afford another set (they are $100 australian!).
    Looking at the fenders, what sort of sound comes from the stainless flats? And how long am I going to get out of them (average of 3-4 hours playing time per week)? As for the LaBellas, they are looking quite pricy!
     
  4. Landyachtz

    Landyachtz

    Sep 5, 2005
    Tempe, AZ
    never boil strings. That's one of the many things this forum has taught me, I now soak my strings in denatured alcohol overnight, and they are brand new by morning. However, I'm not sure how this will work with the elixir's coating. Someone should be able to chime in and tell you if that will work.
     
  5. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    Stainless flats are pretty bright for the first few days, but if you're playing them 3-4 hours a day, they will go dead fairly quick. But there's good news, because flats always sound better the deader they are. My LaBella stainless flats have been on my P copy for 6 years now and they sound better every day. All strings go dead eventually. Elixirs maybe not as quick, but they do go dead.

    Just about every string maker offers a flatwound, and most offer a stainless flatwound. Check around, you'll find a good price eventually.
     
  6. weeding

    weeding

    May 17, 2005
    3-4 hours a week mate, not a day (I'd love to say I'm that dedicated, but I'm not..)

    That's cool about the sound, as I love that double bass thumb, and really want to hear what it will sound like in some of the stuff I play. Just a question for some solo stuff, do they effect the audibility/volume of harmonics? For instance, can you still hear harmonics below the 5th fret easily? Also, do they have any effect on tapping sounds? I know I may sound a little ignorant on the topic, but I figure asking questions in the best way to discover info! Thanks to both of you for the excellent and punctual replies!
     
  7. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    You can use flats for harmonics and tapping. I know Steve Lawson does. He uses a brand called Elite. Most flats make tapping pretty difficult because of their thickness but it can be done, and harmonics are easy while the strings are new, but get a bit more difficult to work with as they go dead.
     
  8. 59jazz

    59jazz Infinite Rider on the Big Dogma Supporting Member

    Soaking the Elixirs in alcohol will cause them to be "fuzzy". :bawl: Tried that on a set of polys.