Bolt-On Gang

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by KJung, Sep 8, 2005.

  1. I've enjoyed other TBers posting their 'bass family' so I thought I'd do the same. Here are all but one of my basses (a neck through, hippie sandwich holdout!). This collection gives me a wide variety of old school to modern, mellow to aggressive tones:

    Rob Allen MB2 (Swamp Ash/Fiddle Back Maple top/Ebony Board)
    Lakland 55-94 Deluxe with Seymours
    Sadowsky NYC Alder/RW
    MTD 535 (Swamp Ash/Quilted Maple/Wenge neck and board)
    Celinter Update 5 (Ash/Birdseye Maple neck and board)


  2. James Hart

    James Hart

    Feb 1, 2002
    Endorsing Artist: see profile
    very nice! I prefer a bolt necked bass as well.
  3. Count me in this gang (save for my set-neck Epi hollowbody)

    all the rest be bolt-ons.
  4. mark beem

    mark beem Gold Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2001
    New Hope, Alabama
  5. bgartist

    bgartist Supporting Member

    Feb 4, 2004
    Chicago, IL
    I only have bolt-ons. The only neck-thru I ever played that I liked was a Ken Smith. Still, it was not for me.
  6. Thanks guys! It is very cool now that there are so many 'exotic' custom or semi-custom bolt-on basses available. Back in the day, if you wanted something 'fancy', you had to go neck through. There are obviously many wonderful neck through basses out there, but through the years, every bass that I played that really felt and sounded good to me happened to be a bolt-on.... so, that's where I ended up in a big way :bassist:
  7. Frank Martin

    Frank Martin Bitten by the luthiery bug...

    Oct 8, 2001
    Budapest, Hungary, EU
    Me too.
  8. Wilbyman


    Sep 10, 2003
    Parkersburg, WV
    All beatiful basses! As soon as I get my Roscoe...and score my jazz bass...I'm going to put up a pic of my bolt-on group. You seem to have all the tones covered there...fretless, modern, 60's jazz and 70's jazz, and an "allrounder" with the Lakland.
  9. QU!CK


    Apr 26, 2005
    Charlotte, NC
    B.O. for life :bassist:

    lol,something about that just doesn't sound right...

  10. j-raj

    j-raj Bassist: Educator/Soloist/Performer Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jan 14, 2003
    Atlanta, GA!
    very nice collection KJung!

    Except for my Paduak Fretless... Bolt-ons are the way for me!
  11. Jonki

    Jonki I will not slap my Bee!

    Oct 14, 2003
    Arendal, Norway
    nice collection!

    Bolt-on for teh win! i really love the punch of it :D
  12. Brendan


    Jun 18, 2000
    Austin, TX
    I honestly don't believe there is an audible difference between N/T and B/O; I prefer B/O because is something tragic goes down, I can replace a neck, or even a body. If a neck through bass get's it's neck snapped in half, you have two options: repair work of Doom, or scrap it. If that happens to a bolt neck, and you're good to go.
  13. Geezerman


    Nov 28, 2004
    Chicago, IL
    Ah i love that sadowski!
  14. JimmyM

    JimmyM Supporting Member

    Apr 11, 2005
    Apopka, FL
    Endorsing: Ampeg Amps, EMG Pickups
    I would have to disagree. I think a neck-thru creates a lot more sustain than a bolt-on (and I'm not saying that's a good thing), and I've noticed that neck-thrus have a bit more clarity on the low notes than some (not all) cheaper bolt-ons. I prefer bolt-ons myself, but I do hear differences between the two.

  15. The probability of a neck problem is relatively remote... so that doesn't really play into my mix and preference for bolt-ons. However, there are so many confounding variables, that it's unclear if N/T vs. B/O is a crucial factor. What I've found is that basses that are bolt-on, in general, are more to my taste. That could be due to the fact that luthiers oriented toward bolt on construction are more oriented toward a somewhat traditional 'Fenderish' vibe... which I prefer. So many things go into the mix, it's hard to isolate the impact of a single component unless everything else is held constant. I know Dan Lenard of LAG has ordered a number of 'Stambaugh Twins' to test out these assumptions, with just one thing different between the two basses (bolt-on vs. neck through, 34" vs. 35", etc). However, even different pieces of wood have different inherent sound qualities... it's almost impossible!

    However, that being said... the bolt-on basses, in general, do seem to have a certain 'bounce' and quickness to them that I haven't heard in a neck through instrument up to this point.

    Anyway, thanks all for the comments on 'the gang' :)
  16. jazzbasta


    Jul 16, 2005
    Nice collection. How do you like that Rob Allen? (It's on my list of potential fretless basses.)

  17. I like it a lot. It's about as close to an upright sound as you are going to get in a bass guitar. It's very well made, and very, very light (a little over 7 pounds). It is a little neck heavy, probably due to the very light body and 35" scale. The B string is just OK... I actually originally ordered the 5 string so it would match up with most of my other basses (5 string, 35" scale). I was thinking it would make it easier for my intonation. I would actually order the 4 string version if I was to do it over.

    You really need a two channel amp (or some sort of additional preamp/tone control) if you are going to double with it on a gig. Even with the internal preamp (there's only a volume control and a trim pot to reduce the treble response), this bass puts out a very different signal than a magnetic pickup bass.... massively louder (there is no volume trim pot that I can see in the cavity), and huge low end. I usually significantly roll of the bass and really punch the mids at around 500hz... it sounds just wonderful then... but you can't just unplug a Jazz Bass and plug this in to the same channel and settings on a gig.

    Anyway, very nice bass. They come up used quite a bit on the Bass Northwest website, so keep your eye open for one.
  18. That is one impressive collection, sir! Beautiful basses, one and all.
    My little family of four is all bolt-on, as well.