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Boomy Room - What to do?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by GrooveSlave, Apr 28, 2003.


  1. GrooveSlave

    GrooveSlave

    Mar 20, 2003
    Dallas, TX
    Our band just started practicing in a rehearsal room that is very boomy. Bass tone stinks. I've cut the bass on my amp and that seems to help a bit.

    This raises the question in my mind of how to deal with a boomy, bright, hard room on a gig. In the rehearsal room, we can put stuff on the walls. But, you can't do that at a gig.

    Can anyone offer suggestions on how to deal with this besides cutting bass on your amp? Or do you just cut bass, boost mids and deal with it? :(
     
  2. Frank Martin

    Frank Martin Bitten by the luthiery bug...

    Oct 8, 2001
    Budapest, Hungary, EU
    Yep.
     
  3. A couple of suggestions:

    1) Move the bass amp away from a corner. Or from the back wall.

    2) Raise the speaker cabinet off the floor, so it will decouple.

    3) There is some gel-pad material you can use to decouple the floor from the cabinet for more consistent response that some people on this forum swear by. Can't recall the name at the moment. Any help out there on this one?
     
  4. top028

    top028

    Dec 14, 1999
    Lancaster, PA
    I dont have any magazines with me, but I know in the back of Bass Player there is an advertisement for a acoustic isolator pad, or some thing like that. I forget off hand who makes it, but supposedly it perfectly isolates your cabinet from the floor. I have the same problem, and actually prefer a spongey stage. Helps my little two tens make heavey boomy lows.
     
  5. GrooveSlave

    GrooveSlave

    Mar 20, 2003
    Dallas, TX
    There is some gel-pad material you can use to decouple the floor from the cabinet for more consistent response that some people on this forum swear by.

    Yes, I remember seeing this stuff in BP. This would seem to be great for a stage riser made out of wood, since the whole stage becomes a bass resonator. But, it would seem to have no effect on a concrete floor. Correct?

    Thanks for the quick replies.
     
  6. I believe it's the opposite. Floor coupling seems to "work best" on concrete or tile floors rather than wood floors or carpeted floors.

    Down in South Florida, most homes have either concrete or tile on the first floor. Very few wood floors, due to the climate. You learn to adjust for acoustically live rooms to play private house parties down here.
     
  7. GrooveSlave

    GrooveSlave

    Mar 20, 2003
    Dallas, TX
    I believe it's the opposite. Floor coupling seems to "work best" on concrete or tile floors rather than wood floors or carpeted floors.

    By "work best", do you mean that the need for this type of isolation is greater on concrete floors than on a wooden stage riser?
     
  8. vanselus

    vanselus

    Sep 20, 2000
    Boulder, CO
    None
    parametric EQ's help a lot in these situations too - that way you can pretty much isolate the offensive freq's and still have the tone you want...
     
  9. A boomy room is a bass players worse night mare. Cutting back on the bottom end and boosting the mids helps. What usually really messes things up is a sound man that is "KICK DRUM CRAZY" and cranks up the kick drum to a point that it sounds like a cannon. The bass player may as well not even show up.:mad:
     
  10. GrooveSlave

    GrooveSlave

    Mar 20, 2003
    Dallas, TX
    parametric EQ's help a lot in these situations too - that way you can pretty much isolate the offensive freq's and still have the tone you want...

    Any tips for isolating the offending freqs? I've never been very good at this EQ thing...:confused:
     
  11. vanselus

    vanselus

    Sep 20, 2000
    Boulder, CO
    None
    I just take the parametric and boost it 1/2 way. then sweep the mids (narrow as possible band) until the boominess is the absolute worst. Then cut that freq until the boom is at a more tolerable level.

    what gear do you play?
     
  12. GrooveSlave

    GrooveSlave

    Mar 20, 2003
    Dallas, TX
    I'm trying to decide between using my POD pro or my ADA MB-1 through a QSC PLX-1202 -> Eden 210xlt. Frankly, in my practice area at home I thought the MB-1 killed the POD. The POD rules through headphones. And it seems like the POD does better in the boomy practice room.

    I'm going to raise the cab off of the concrete floor with cinder blocks and move it a bit out of the corner and try your EQ trick tonight.

    IIRC, the amp model that I'm using in the POD that sounds the best in the boom room is the GK 800RB. I can't remember if it has parametric EQ, but I could just use the POD's post EQ which is parametric (I think). It's been a while since I've been worried about tweaking sounds as we've been putting a band together for the past 3 months. Looks like first gig is in 2 weeks. YIKES.

    Anyhow, thanks to all for the good advice. I'll post results tomorrow.
     
  13. Sundogue

    Sundogue

    Apr 26, 2001
    Wausau, WI
    A good compressor works great to cut boominess in a room where the low bass frequencies are out of control.
     
  14. lo-freq

    lo-freq aka UFO

    Jan 19, 2003
    The Republic of Texas
    I do just the opposite of Van; I cut the level as low as it will go, bang on my open 5 strings, and do a sweep. When you hit the booming freq. you will know it. Then just adjust the level until it reduces the boom, but still lets your bass speak there.
     
  15. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    When you say "boomy" do you mean echoey or just plain muddy?

    If mud is the problem, check out this thread for some ideas.
     
  16. 100Hz will bogart the whole band; scoop it.
     
  17. bunkaroo

    bunkaroo

    Apr 25, 2003
    Endorsing Artist: Spector Basses
    I think I've experienced the opposite of this. I'm in a rehearsal room that's about 13' x 13'. I'm using an Eden WT-300 through an Eden D410XLT. I'm about 1.5 feet from the back wall. At first I was having a problem with losing a lot of low end in the room, whereas in gig settings I had plenty of it with the exact same settings. So I started taking the casters off the cabinet so it could touch the floor when at rehearsal, which seemed to help a little but not much. BTW, I'm on a spongy carpeted wood floor.

    I then started thinking it could be a power issue, as one of my guitarists' Furman meter showed his outlet at about 115-117. I had been meaning to upgrade my PL-8, so I went ahead and invested in the Furman AR-1215 regulator, which converts 97-141 volts to a steady 120. Next rehearsal, I left the casters on, and the bass sounded so much bigger I actually turned down a notch from my usual Master Volume setting.

    I'm going to try it with the AR-1215 and no casters, as well as with casters and bypassing the AR-1215 to see if I can truly figure out whether the AR-1215 is really helping that much.

    Also, this might be a weird question, but would temperature have anything to do with the low end dying quickly? Seems like I've noticed it more on the nights when our room was pretty cold.
     
  18. lo-freq

    lo-freq aka UFO

    Jan 19, 2003
    The Republic of Texas
    Spongy, carpeted wood floors really suck bass.

    Try to find a solid spot where there is a cross-brace under the floor or in a doorway or as far as you can get your amp into a corner.

    Colder should stiffen up the floors and walls, which should actually improve the bass.
     
  19. jdombrow

    jdombrow Supporting Member

    Jan 16, 2002
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Aside from all the eq suggestions, can you put some carpets on the floor and walls to cut down the echo? If you can't hang the carpeting, you can always carpet some wooden frames that lean against the walls. This will help everyone's sound.

    JD
     
  20. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    Depends on the room and the stage. I've noticed that hollow wooden stages kinda act like a speaker cabinet and have their own resonant frequency (or 5). I've also noticed some entire rooms do the same thing. Us bass players (and sound guys) are the ones who have to deal with this. Guitarists and drummers wouldn't know that the hell we're talking about right now.