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BOSE FREE!!!! But what is biwiring?

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by chris4001asat, Jan 17, 2006.


  1. chris4001asat

    chris4001asat

    Dec 16, 2002
    Toledo, Ohio
    Warehouse Manager : Reverend Guitars
    After reading all the negative things about Bose here, and rearranging my living room furniture, My Bose system wasn't sounding as good. A local store was having a big sale, so I splurged on some Klipsch floor speakers. Wow, what a HUGE difference. Question now. What is biwiring? They mention it in the speaker instructions, but don't tell you why? I emailed the company, and got a large report back filled with graphs , charts, and really BIG words, but still not a simple answer on what it is, why do it, and what it "sounds" like. Anybody have their speakers wired this way>?
     
  2. chris4001asat

    chris4001asat

    Dec 16, 2002
    Toledo, Ohio
    Warehouse Manager : Reverend Guitars
    All I know is that the speaker has two inputs on it. You're supposed to connect the two inputs to the same channel on the receiver.
     
  3. Trevorus

    Trevorus

    Oct 18, 2002
    Urbana, IL
    I wonder if it has to do with the internal crossover...?
     
  4. groovit

    groovit

    Oct 12, 2004
    New Hampsha
    Not sure about connecting them to the same channel, but one advantage of having home theater speakers that are bi-wiring capable is that you can use them for separate setups.

    For example: when watching a DVD you want your full 5.1 surround, but maybe you don't want that when listening to a CD or other audio source. Depending on how you wire the speakers, you can have two setups (typically called "A" and "B" on your reciever) depending on your audio source.

    Alternatively, you can have a completely different source than your HT reciever wired in the second input on the speaker.
     
  5. Philbiker

    Philbiker Pat's the best!

    Dec 28, 2000
    Northern Virginia, USA
    Biwiring doesn't do anything. It's a marketing gimmick to sell speaker wire. Enjoy your new speakers!
     
  6. Thank you for NOT choosing Bose. You have chosen wisely.
     
  7. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    Like Philbiker said, it's a gimmick. Just put jumpers between the LF and HF inputs and run a single-pair speaker cable to each loudspeaker.
     
  8. MJ5150

    MJ5150 Terrific Twister

    Apr 12, 2001
    Lacey, WA
    Wow, you guys are smart!! Thanks Philbiker and Bob for that info. I would most likely have went for the gimmick and bought some wire I did not need.

    I'll be purchasing a home theater system in the next few weeks, so this info is valuable to me. Look for a PM or two from me Bob, and Phil. :)

    -Mike
     
  9. groovit

    groovit

    Oct 12, 2004
    New Hampsha
    Bob, or Philbiker: Does that mean that the situation I proposed, with the separate audio sources for each input, is invalid? Does it not work like that?
     
  10. They're actually telling people to run 2 wires to each side of the speaker input? Nice....
     
  11. chris4001asat

    chris4001asat

    Dec 16, 2002
    Toledo, Ohio
    Warehouse Manager : Reverend Guitars

    Actually I'm replacing Bose! In all honesty, they sounded pretty good until I rearranged my furniture. Then all of a sudden, I had to have my bass control maxxed to get some bottom end.

    Anybody interested in a used Bose system? They're going used on Ebay for $200!! I think I'm heading in that direction!
     
  12. chris4001asat

    chris4001asat

    Dec 16, 2002
    Toledo, Ohio
    Warehouse Manager : Reverend Guitars
    Actually, they came with jumpers. I was going to take the jumpers out, and run speakers A to one set, then run speakers B to the other set.
     
  13. bi-wiring is a technique in which two sets of wires are sent to the speaker from a single amplifier channel, with one set being connected to the LF side of the crossover and the other set being connected to the HF side of the crossover. loudspeakers are typically supplied with a jumper for those who opt not to bi-wire. as always, i'd suggest research rather than taking someone else's opinion -- usually the most sound approach is relatively obvious after reading.

    robb.
     
  14. chris4001asat

    chris4001asat

    Dec 16, 2002
    Toledo, Ohio
    Warehouse Manager : Reverend Guitars
    Actually, the speakers have two sets of inputs. They were telling me to run two sets of wire into ONE of the sides of the receiver, and then into both sets on the speaker?!?! It just didn't make any sense to me....
     
  15. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    Normally, a full-range loudspeaker has an input to a passive crossover that splits the audio spectrum into their respective drivers.

    In a bi-wired loudspeaker, the high-pass and low-pass sections of the crossover are separated, each with their own input, and the idea is that you run a separate cable from each one to the amp output. Proponents of this method claim that low frequencies and highs have to fight each other to travel along the same wire, but no such phenomenon has ever been documented. No other industry has had problems with different frequency ranges traveling on the same wire. ;)
     
  16. technically that will work, as long as you turn on A + B, but it'd be easier to run them both off the same output. unless you have connectors that make it prohibitively difficult, that is.

    robb.
     
  17. Philbiker

    Philbiker Pat's the best!

    Dec 28, 2000
    Northern Virginia, USA
    WHat you wrote doesn't make any sense to me. Biwiring is irrelevant.
     
  18. Philbiker

    Philbiker Pat's the best!

    Dec 28, 2000
    Northern Virginia, USA
    It doesn't make any sense at all. Use the jumpers and run one wire and enjoy.
     
  19. Philbiker

    Philbiker Pat's the best!

    Dec 28, 2000
    Northern Virginia, USA
    Don't do this! Nothing you're using was desinged to work this way. Just run one cable from the "A" speakers to the receivers.

    Hey Bob what about upgrading my power cord!!! :smug: :hyper: :help: :scowl:
     
  20. So to make sure that I understand what is happening, there is a LF and HF output on the amplifier that are sent separately to the speaker. Then the signals are recombined and sent to the cross-over?

    Edit: I think I undestand what is going on. There is no LF an HF output on the amp, but rather there are two wires coming out of each of the positive and negative terminals on the amplifier. Then these are separately connected to the two sections of the cross-over. The reasoning that I read was that:
    This makes no sense at all, they've simply put a big run of wire between the sections of the cross-over rather than a short one that would normally be there. And how does a bass signal swamp a treble signal? This stuff is just insane.