Bouncy swing of the 30's!

Discussion in 'Jazz Technique [DB]' started by perytojie, Jan 4, 2005.

  1. perytojie

    perytojie

    Dec 2, 2004
    Nancy, FRANCE
    What you say he's an absolute truth. We played for almost a week everyday (rehearsing & gigging) last week as a quartet (jordan & bostic stuff), which never happened before & actually increased our swing by 50%!!!

    I just couldn't believe it, it just seems that everything was more & more coherent & natural...

    yeah, good exercise, but when it comes down to playing in a real situation with other people all feeling swing differently, even if you the king of swing at home, you're nothing if you don't try to play with the guys...


    I have another question concerning a upright bassist named Herbert Gordy. He played with Red Prysock & other guys such as Earl Bostic. On one of Bostic's album ("jazz as i feel" aka "jazz time") especially on "fast track" (it's the name of the track) you can almost here the upbeat when he plays... How does he do that? I think he's the bounciest bassist i ever heard in a jazz context... It's weird bacause he doesn't sound the same on Prysock's album... Do you know the guy?

    And finally, even if it's another thread, i love the sound of gut & ordered Pirastro strings (Olive G & D, Eudoxa A & E) but wonder how it'll sound in more modern situations... (Check my profile...)

    Thanx
     
  2. perytojie

    perytojie

    Dec 2, 2004
    Nancy, FRANCE
    It sounds more like a really soft ghost note, as if he put his hands on the string without pressing it & then pulled the string... I don't think he did it on purpose but it works well.

    Do you think it might be because of his setup? Higher action means larger vibration of the string most of the time. Ok, let assume the strings vibrate so much that everytime you pull one there's a sort stopping-the-string sound before it actually makes the note. What you think?


    Thanx for the advice. I hesitated for a long time but then decided to try out real gut strings with a metal wrapping before switching completely to the other world.

    One thing about pirastro strings & the American market : I bought those strings for $360. Those strings are made in Germany which has a frontier with France and is part of the U.E. which means tax-free business within those countries. SO, how can you explain THAT : if I'd bought them in France I would have paid the U.S. equivalent of $730!!!!!!!!

    Hey Jason are you really a Citroën cars fan?
     
  3. Damon Rondeau

    Damon Rondeau Journeyman Clam Artist Supporting Member

    Nov 19, 2002
    Winnipeg, baby
    It's not so much a shortage of sheep (headline: NO GUTS, NO GLORY) as it is a real b*tch to make the things in the first place. Adrian has got a link for us -- if I recall correctly -- to a site showing in some detail how those suckers are made. Steel strings seem simple in comparison, especially once you've invented and paid for the winding machine.
     
  4. perytojie

    perytojie

    Dec 2, 2004
    Nancy, FRANCE
    I'd be interested to see that site...
     
  5. Damon Rondeau

    Damon Rondeau Journeyman Clam Artist Supporting Member

    Nov 19, 2002
    Winnipeg, baby
    Yeah, I can't remember whether the reference was made here or at 2xbasslist, but my memory says it was Adrian Cho who laid the link on us. I expect we'll hear from him before too long...

    (Is this the right time? OK: Yo! Adrian!)
     
  6. perytojie

    perytojie

    Dec 2, 2004
    Nancy, FRANCE
    I don't know if this site :

    http://www.gamutstrings.com/

    is the one we're talking about but they have a very comprehensive article on how to make those big animal strings!
     
  7. Don Higdon

    Don Higdon In Memoriam

    Dec 11, 1999
    Princeton Junction, NJ
    Thats the one. You can't pay me enough to do that.
     
  8. Damon Rondeau

    Damon Rondeau Journeyman Clam Artist Supporting Member

    Nov 19, 2002
    Winnipeg, baby
    Voila!

    That's the site. To get to the article, use the little link bar at the top of the page ("How the strings are made", or something like that.)

    It seems to me an involved process using an organic raw material likely to be quite variable in quality; there's specialized labour, equipment and processes involved; and, finally, there is a very limited market comprising professionals who, when they want them, really want them. Sounds to me like the very recipe for a high-ticket price.

    Just like double basses themselves!
     
  9. perytojie

    perytojie

    Dec 2, 2004
    Nancy, FRANCE
    What i found amazing is that gut strings made in EU are almost twice as expensive in the EU than in the US! I can't understand that...

    Cool site by the way...