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bridge keeps falling

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by gumby7, Jul 7, 2000.


  1. gumby7

    gumby7

    Feb 15, 2000
    hey guys i have a fender mim jazz deluxe. i love the bass but i keep having to adjust the string height on it because the bridge keeps falling. is there any way i can fix it? someone told me it is better to buy a badass2 bridge? is there a better bridge? what is the price for them?

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    Sometimes life seems like a dream, especially when I look down and see that I forgot to put on my pants.
     
  2. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    If you mean the screws are coming undone on the saddles, adjust them to the height you want and put some clear nail polish on top of the screws. When dry it will easily break free if you need to adjust them, otherwise it will stay in one postion. Total cost...maybe $2.00
     
  3. eli

    eli Mad showoff 7-stringer and Wish lover Supporting Member

    Dec 12, 1999
    NW suburban Chicago
    Yes, a BadAss II will solve the problem. But it will also change the sound. I loved what it did for my post-CBS Precision -- much brighter and clearer.

    But if you really like what your bass sounds like, then try the fingernail polish thing. I can also tell you from first-hand experience that Elmer's glue has the same effect.




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    * eli@ilovefretless.com*
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  4. gweimer

    gweimer

    Apr 6, 2000
    Columbus, OH
    I went through the very same thing when I had my Fender. I used to use teflon tape to wrap the screws, but it didn't last long. I was adjusting the bridge at least once a night when I played out. I finally bought the BadAss II. I never had to worry about the saddle pieces moving after that. My viewpoint is that if something is wrong, don't put a band-aid on it, fix it.
     
  5. Bernie

    Bernie

    Dec 12, 1999
    I think your best bet is to just replace the bridge.Even if the nail polish fix works its not much of a bridge and will always have poor sustain.Mars has the LQ BA-2 for 39.99.Warmouth has the Gotoh 201 for 20.Both are direct replacements requiring no mods to install though you do have to file string grooves in the saddles on the BA.You should also use the original screws as the bridges come with larger ones.Either would be a significant improvement over the stocker.Good luck!
     
  6. rojo412

    rojo412 MARK IT ZERO! Supporting Member

    Feb 26, 2000
    Cleveland, OH.
    Granted, fender bridges (replacement OEM or upgrades) come very easily. But you could just get some loktite and dab that on the threads. The nail polish or teflon tape could work too. Loktite was suggested to me when I had that problem with my Stingray. I just adjusted it and it stopped.
    If you get a bridge, a Badass is nice, but you could get a gotoh and it's very versatile and it doesn't need to be grooved.

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    Carpet cleaning sucks
     
  7. I don't understand this bridge problem you are discussing. Do the set screws turn from vibration causing the saddles to get lower?
     
  8. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    That's typically what happens, Rick.
     
  9. is it possible to get replacement saddles? cause i have the exact same problem with my g string, and g string saddle only. and i have the opposit problem with my a and d string, where i cant even adjust them, and they are stuck to where they were set. the bridge otherwise is in perfect condition. is there anyway to just get new saddles for the bridge?
     
  10. frost13

    frost13

    Apr 12, 2000
    What???? A bridge problem on a Fender bass? How could that possible be???????..... [​IMG]
     
  11. eli

    eli Mad showoff 7-stringer and Wish lover Supporting Member

    Dec 12, 1999
    NW suburban Chicago
    Muttluk --

    Best bet would be to call Fender. If they won't sell 'em, then try a parts shop like www.stewmac.com or www.allparts.com These guys usually have EVERYTHING for Fenders. But if your bridge is giving you this much hassle, I'd have to consider a complete replacement.

    And Gumby --

    There's a reason people swear by their '62 p-basses and it ain't the BadAss bridge. I meant it when I said they change the tone. Not that I'm against 'em, but I wanted you to have as much information as possible.



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    * eli@ilovefretless.com*
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  12. lowend

    lowend

    Apr 1, 2000
    I replaced my Jazz with a BADass bridge and did not file any grooves in the saddle as Bernie mentioned. Is this necessary? ..
     
  13. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    Sounds like some people here need a book on Guitar Maintenance 101. The problems people are mentioning here are extremely easy to fix and do not usually warrant a replacement of any parts.

    The setscrews on a bridge saddle can work themselves loose. There's a reason for this and I'll explain it if someone wants me to. It is not a big deal to fix. Several options have been mentioned here. If you'd rather spend $50+ on a new bridge as opposed to $3 for something that will stop the screw from turning... go right ahead.

    Re: the saddle screws that are stuck. Loosen the string so no pressure is on the saddle. Place paper or a cloth under the saddle and spray the screw with WD40 if it is truly seized. If it's just hard to turn lubricating it can still help. Another thing to make sure of is that whatever you use to turn the screw, the bigger the handle the easier it will be to apply torque to loosen the screw. Snapping your wrist quickly when turning the screw will usually apply more torque and break a stuck screw free. Also use the right tool for the type of screw you have. If it's an allen screw don't try to jam a Phillips head in the hole.

    The loose screws probably figure in whenever someone says stock Fender bridges are crappy. I think that rep comes more from people not understanding the very simple mechanical aspects of bridges than anything else. If they did, this would not be an issue IMO [​IMG]

    As far as replacement bridges being "better" and having more sustain, etc. my stock 78 Jazz (with the "crappy" stock bridge) sustains quite well and I like the sound and playability of it much more than my 68 Jazz with the BadAss II (hey, it was $20 brand new). Here's a huge point about changing styles/manufacturers of bridges: if you love the way your bass sounds there's no gaurantee you'll love the replacement bridge. Chances are it will change the sound. Change is not always good. Just something to consider. As far as sustain goes there are other factors in that but most people key in on the bridge. Make sure everything on your bass is securely fastened, especially the neck, tuners and bridge. YMMV

    I guess the nail polish/Loctite solutions could be looked upon as a Band-Aid. I disagree [​IMG] It is not a temporary fix. The screws will not move again until you move them. In the military we used the same approach to secure adjusting screws in potentiometers. Worked every time and stayed put. What's the problem with that? [​IMG]

    These kinds of problems occur regularly in life, if you understand the process they're much easier to fix. Take a logical approach and chances are you can figure most things out for yourself. For example:

    The problem: saddles drop over a period of time.

    The process (what makes the saddles move in the first place): screws adjust the height of the saddles up and down.

    Possible causes: the screws are moving on their own; the bridge is sinking into the body [​IMG]; the neck is moving, not the bridge; a few others that are even less likely.

    Systematically rule out your probable causes: how can you keep the screw from turning once it's set? Try that solution. If they still move (of course that means you didn't make them stop turning but... [​IMG]) Try another way to stop them. If you stop them and still have the problem, then move on to your next possible cause.

    Probably more than anyone wanted to hear but I like to figure things out for myself and am usually curious why others don't. Maybe this will help.
     
  14. Sinep_Taf

    Sinep_Taf

    Jul 5, 2000
    I have Fender P Bass too. And i Had this problem when it was my main bass. I took it to the store I baught it from. They replaced the sattle that was lowering. happened to be the E. Anyways it still does it. So Just get yourself an Ibanez you will be more Happy after that. I KNOW I WAS!
     
  15. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    Hello....McFly!!
     
  16. Scok

    Scok

    Apr 20, 2000
    Now That's FUNNY! [​IMG]
     
  17. ONYX

    ONYX

    Apr 14, 2000
    Michigan
    Had the same problem with one of my Jazz basses, but it only did it on the G-string.

    My solution? Went to the hardware store and bought better quality set screws. Problem solved.

    Total cost? 5 cents.

    Bear in mind that chrome or nickle plated set screws are more likely to loosen because of vibration. Try to get screws that are coated with Black Oxide ( a type of industrial plating ) or even plain, uncoated screws, although these may rust.

    [This message has been edited by ONYX (edited August 01, 2000).]
     
  18. Brad Johnson

    Brad Johnson Commercial User

    Mar 8, 2000
    Gaithersburg, Md
    Boom Bass Cabinets, DR strings
    Shhh, ONYX. Are you trying to screw it up for all of us Leo Quan shareholders. I already had to dump my Gotoh stock [​IMG]

    The word for today is "Sustain"...say it with me...sustain.

    That's better.
     
  19. gweimer

    gweimer

    Apr 6, 2000
    Columbus, OH
    As much as my posting about this may sound odd, I'm in full agreement with Brad. Explore all possibilities before deciding, especially if the bass in question is your perfect bass. In my case, I did explore most options, other than the lock-tite. My bass wasn't in great shape when I first got it, and the saddle pieces needed adjusting at least once a night on a gig. This continued after trying teflon tape, and replacing the saddle screws. I think I finally reached the conclusion that my saddle pieces were stripped. At that point, all efforts short of changing the bridge were band-aid solutions. I also didn't notice a drastic change in tone for having done that. My feelings are that the tone of the bass is more dependent on the wood and the strings; a bridge can provide some enhancement, but it is still just a steel base for the strings to rest on (although I've heard that the 2Tek bridge will change my opinion of that thought..hmm, next bass - Hamer Cruise...).