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Bright-fat J bass

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by wtf_is_a_bass, Sep 29, 2005.


  1. wtf_is_a_bass

    wtf_is_a_bass Guest

    Aug 11, 2005
    Sydney, Australia
    Endorsing Artist: PiGLET picks
    Is there a way to get a bright-fat tone (like duncan quarter pounder p bass pups) on a jazz bass without a s-1 switch?

    Maybe series wiring or pickups or strings? Thanx
     
  2. Nedmundo

    Nedmundo Supporting Member

    Jan 7, 2005
    Philadelphia
    How about Quarter Pounders for your Jazz? As for series wiring, that's exactly what the S-1 switch does.
     
  3. wtf_is_a_bass

    wtf_is_a_bass Guest

    Aug 11, 2005
    Sydney, Australia
    Endorsing Artist: PiGLET picks
    do quarter pound p's sound similar to the j's?

    And i knew the s-1 switch made wiring series, i just cant afford a bass with s-1... but thanx
     
  4. get yourself a push-pull pot for $15 and do the series mod yourself...it's heaps cheaper than pickups...and you should do that way before you consider putting in new pickups...
     
  5. wtf_is_a_bass

    wtf_is_a_bass Guest

    Aug 11, 2005
    Sydney, Australia
    Endorsing Artist: PiGLET picks
    Wow! Thanks for that great tip. However i'm nearly a total noob on bass mods so what is the difference between a normal pot and push-pull? Is it a switch?

    I cant wire so how much would it be to get a shop to series my bass?
     
  6. a push-pull pot is a normal pot that has a switch attached to it that is activated by a push or pull action...the switch needs to be 2P2T (aka DPDT, double-pole double-throw), but this is typical of push-pull pots.

    You could do this with a separate DPDT switch, but then you need to drill an extra hole and everything...this way is MUCH cleaner...I'm ordering one and doing it to my PJ style bass...



    there's a huge thread on here in this forum about doing the series mod. do a search.
     
  7. Nedmundo

    Nedmundo Supporting Member

    Jan 7, 2005
    Philadelphia
    Sorry! I misunderstood your question. I have a Jazz with S-1, and the series wiring definitely fattens up the tone. I'm not sure it would be the "bright-fat" you're looking for because the treble gets pulled back, but it's a nice option to have. I think hot J pickups like Quarter Pounders would sound huge in series. Definitely worth a try.
     
  8. bigbeefdog

    bigbeefdog Who let the dogs in?

    Jul 7, 2003
    Mandeville, LA
  9. wtf_is_a_bass

    wtf_is_a_bass Guest

    Aug 11, 2005
    Sydney, Australia
    Endorsing Artist: PiGLET picks
    Oh thanks for all your help guys!

    I'll nearly definitely install a push-pull pot! Maybe later on ill get some quarter pounders to improve the sound even further
     
  10. pickles

    pickles Supporting Member

    Mar 23, 2000
    Ventura, CA
    Thats a great idea to try, but ultimately if you want the sound of a quarter pounder P-bass pickup, you're better off getting a P bass (or PJ). Nothing but a P pickup sounds quite like a P pickup.
     
  11. +1

    Accept no substitute.

    :D

    It is OK to have one wife, but having only one bass is simply not generous on your part.

    You should wn a J, a P, and a MM (I do), because each is unique unto itself. My J does double duty, because it is a fretless. Both Fenders are MIM, and good players. The cost is low, and I will own both for the long term. My MM is actually a G&L L1500 that was built to my specs, and it is fast becoming my main player.
     
  12. Moo

    Moo Banned

    Dec 14, 2002
    Oakland, CA
    I'd agree with that. But given the restriction of a j shaped route I think the split coil j humbuckers get closer than a single coil or stacked humbucker. So I wouldn't recommend the 1//4 pounder.
     
  13. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    FWIW:

    in my experience to date I've found more J's with better P tone in the bridge position than the P's I've had in P position. One of the reasons I haven't done more P reviews is cause I just give up on them from time to time. But I pick it back up periodically cause even though I'm basically a J guy, I like a good P tone and can see no reason I can't have it in a P pup. Over time it became a challenge as much as anything.

    There's a lot of variation in tone in P pups just as there is in J's but there are characteristic qualities that are associated to a P tone. A qaulity P tone I associate with the classic vintage Fender P and it's a hard tone to nail the mids on especially. Too boxie, too scooped, not the right mix of mids, have the bottom but too ill-defined on the top half, has the mids but not the thump, not warm enough, whatever. The Dirnt P has been the best to date and it is decent. A Bongo pup in bridge postion puts out a better P tone than most of the P's I've had. There are a lot of variables involved in any tone besides the pup. What you run the pup through has a major impact.

    But for whatever reason, I for one have had a harder time finding good P tone in a P pup than elsewhere.
     
  14. Nedmundo

    Nedmundo Supporting Member

    Jan 7, 2005
    Philadelphia
    I know what you mean. My J is my go-to bass, but I love a good P tone and I'm pretty picky about it. I bought an Am. Series P last year, and it's on its third pickup. The stocker had great tone, but weak output and slightly muddy lows. The DiMarzio Model P had monstrous output and cut and good clarity, but almost no vintage warmth.

    Now I have a Duncan SPB-2 Hot for P-bass, which is awesome overall -- hot output, decent vintage warmth, enough thump for me, and excellent clarity. But it's still missing a little something I'd call "grind." I can probably dial in some of that with different strings, so no worries. I had the perfect P tone in a '94 MIJ Foto Flame, but I just didn't dig the feel of the neck, so I sold it.

    For a passable P tone from a J bass, I'd think a high output humbucking pickup in the neck position would come closest, something like a Seymour Duncan Hot Stack or DiMarzio Model J. My J gets pretty close on some settings with Lindy Fralin Split Jazz. These are linear humbuckers with coils wired in series, and are thus similar to a split coil P-bass design.
     
  15. BassyBill

    BassyBill The smooth moderator... Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Mar 12, 2005
    West Midlands UK
    You need a fretted Jazz real bad. ;)
     
  16. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    FWIW:

    Not implying any J one up thing by the way. It's all different but to say better is pretty situational. Like Real compared to what?

    Getting qulaity J tone (again the classic vintage Fender) has been no easier when it comes right down to it cuase I've gone through at least twice as many (probably 3 x's) J pups to get there as P's.

    Regarding addressing the topic and appeasing both corners, fat bright tone to me says scooped and an SD hot P J hot Stack was a stand out winner from the pups I've had. When I first started experimenting I bought a bass with that combo with an Aggie OBP-1 and I'd heard so much about the Aggie I assumed it was the source of the tone. I pulled the Aggie and those Pups sounded exactly the same without it.

    Real sweet solo and worked to a fair number of tunes but overall not much variety to tone and limited application - going from memory. The review is in the PJ experiment but the fat/bright aspect was so pronounced that part I remember clearly.