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Bringing down the heavy hand on looters

Discussion in 'Off Topic [BG]' started by DigMe, Mar 31, 2006.


  1. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
  2. SnoMan

    SnoMan Words Words Words

    Jan 27, 2001
    Charleston, WV
    Looks like they're burning through a good deal of your tax dollars by doubling the recommended sentence.

    (no, I don't know what the general jail-time for such a crime is, but doubling the recommended doesn't seem appropriate)
     
  3. cheezewiz

    cheezewiz Supporting Member

    Mar 27, 2002
    Ohio
    I agree doubling isn't appropriate. It should be tripled or quadrupled. Taking a loaf of bread to survive is one thing, but taking advantage of a natural disaster is another.
     
  4. Hollow Man

    Hollow Man Supporting Member

    Apr 28, 2003
    Springfield, VA
    I've got no problem with them throwing worthless people like that in jail for a long time.
     
  5. SnoMan

    SnoMan Words Words Words

    Jan 27, 2001
    Charleston, WV

    That'd be fine by me if you wanna keep him locked in your basement, but I wouldn't want to have my money going to keeping him locked up.

    Does he need to be punished for his actions? Yes...but if I don't want my money used if he's giong to be made an example out of.


    Now, if you wanna talk about raising the penalty for more deserving criminals(i.e. pedophiles)...thats a different story IMO.

    This guy's just a deadbeat.
     
  6. guy n. cognito

    guy n. cognito Secret Agent Member Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 28, 2005
    Nashville, TN
    You pay for his crimes either way. Leave him out of jail and you will pay via increased insurance premiums and the costs of catching and trying him again and again and again.

    A sentence like this send a message (a positve message) that this type of behavior will not be tolerated. It will serve not only as a deterrant to the individual sentenced, but to the rest of the worthless scum that may consider this type of behavior in the future.
     
  7. DigMe

    DigMe

    Aug 10, 2002
    Waco, TX
    Perhaps I should have started this in the lounge. Didn't really consider how the discussion would flow. A mod may want to move it.

    bc
     
  8. SnoMan

    SnoMan Words Words Words

    Jan 27, 2001
    Charleston, WV
    He's a junkie.

    He saw an opportunity to score some dope without repercution and he took it. He was caught by coincedence.

    Any dope head would have done it.



    And lets talk about the message.

    How many people do you believe are going to be scared straight by a ten year sentence? honestly?

    Sure, perhaps a few, but this is something to take into consideration with that arguement.

    How many people do you hear about getting killed EVERYDAY in "drug" related shootings, etc.?

    People are getting killed all the time to score and traffic drugs.

    If that isn't gonna stop a junkie...how much is going to jail giong to help?
     
  9. guy n. cognito

    guy n. cognito Secret Agent Member Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 28, 2005
    Nashville, TN
    So no punishment for junkies?
     
  10. cheezewiz

    cheezewiz Supporting Member

    Mar 27, 2002
    Ohio
    So we shouldn't lock up scum because it costs too much? LOL.
     
  11. SnoMan

    SnoMan Words Words Words

    Jan 27, 2001
    Charleston, WV

    He needs to be given the appropriate sentence for his actions.

    I don't necessarily believe that his sentenced should be DOUBLED just because of when his actions took place.

    I do believe that it is aweful that it happened during the aftermath of a natural disaster.

    Here's a question. For every crime committed during the duration of the tragedy, should all conviected be punished excessively? If this one man is, certainly they all should, don't you think?
     
  12. SnoMan

    SnoMan Words Words Words

    Jan 27, 2001
    Charleston, WV
    So, we should send every criminal to jail for life regardless of the offense?
     
  13. bigbeefdog

    bigbeefdog Who let the dogs in?

    Jul 7, 2003
    Mandeville, LA
    There's an underlying problem you're missing.

    When one of these monster hurricanes is a-comin', a lot of folks wrestle with the decision to leave or stay. Part of the problem with leaving is the potential that looters will take advantage of your absence, and the preoccupation of law enforcement with keeping order, and help themselves to whatever they want.

    I know a good number of folks who left for Katrina, didn't suffer too much damage, but had their homes looted before they could get back. These same folks have told me they will not leave next time; instead, they will stay to protect their property. So, their lives will now be placed at risk in the next storm, because of the actions of jackasses like this guy.

    Doggone right he needs to be made an example of. As Cheeze said, the sentence is too SHORT.
     
  14. guy n. cognito

    guy n. cognito Secret Agent Member Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 28, 2005
    Nashville, TN
    Quite honestly, yes, I believe that someone that takes advantage of a national tragedy for personal gain or pleasure should receive additional punishment. Note, I didn't use the word excessively. That's your definition of this situation, not mine.

    Plus, you assume that this guy was a junkie. Did the article say he was an addict? What if he was just stealing drugs to sell for a profit?
     
  15. guy n. cognito

    guy n. cognito Secret Agent Member Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 28, 2005
    Nashville, TN

    Now you're just being dramatic. :rolleyes:
     
  16. Kelly Lee

    Kelly Lee Yeah, I'm a guy! Supporting Member

    Feb 17, 2004
    Marana, AZ, USA
    Personally I like the sentence. I really can't stand looters and rioters. They are both some of the lowest lifeforms on this planet. [​IMG]
     
  17. SnoMan

    SnoMan Words Words Words

    Jan 27, 2001
    Charleston, WV
    If there is some form of looting charge for him to be brought up on that seperates this from regular B&E and drug possession then that his what he should be charged with.

    If it has a higher penalty than the standard crimes....then it would be very appropriate. If this sentence makes headway for a new Looting law to be put on the books, I'd be happy with that.

    The fact is, people are going to loot. You may believe that laws will stop that, but I don't. I don't have an answer as to how to stop it either.

    To recap, I don't agree with a person being given a sentence double of the norm. If the crime he commits has a longer sentence(I.E. a specific looting sentence of some sort), that's fine, but doubling the normal sentence just doesn't sit well or seem appropriate to me.
     
  18. SnoMan

    SnoMan Words Words Words

    Jan 27, 2001
    Charleston, WV
    Was it more dramatic than your and cheese's responses before it?
     
  19. guy n. cognito

    guy n. cognito Secret Agent Member Gold Supporting Member

    Dec 28, 2005
    Nashville, TN
    Well, unfortunately, I have yet to meet anyone who has a better deterant/punishment for thieves than prison. It may not be perfect, but it is the best tool we have.

    I look at it this way: Consider stealing to be like kicking someone in the stomach. Now, kicking someone in the stomack is bad enough when that person is on their feet, healthy and prepared for it. It's a totally different thing, however to kick someone who's already down and injured. That type of attack deserves extra punishment.

    As far as your last comment, that's just semantics. You seem to be saying that you would be ok with the longer sentence so long as the guideline had been in place before the crime was committed. Before, after, who cares? That's why it's called a guideline: the judge has the ultimate discretion.

    At the end of the day, a career criminal has been taken off the street of LA for the next ten years (probably 5 with "good behavior.")
     
  20. fookgub

    fookgub

    Jun 5, 2005
    Houston, TX
    10 years is over the top. Yeah, the guy is a low life, but what did he steal? A few hundred dollars worth of pills. Sorry, but that's not worth 10 years in prison. I don't believe that exorbitant sentences are much of a deterrent to would-be criminals, and I'd much rather see them go after some real bad guys instead of wasting time and money on everyday scumbags.
     

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