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Broken Intervals?

Discussion in 'General Instruction [BG]' started by Zachass, Dec 20, 2005.


  1. Zachass

    Zachass Peavey Partizan

    I was reading Pacman's scale method and there was a post where he talks about practicing broken intervals.
    What are broken intervals and how do you practice them?
     
  2. BassChuck

    BassChuck

    Nov 15, 2005
    Cincinnati
    Generally speaking, a the term 'interval' would mean 2 notes played at the same time (a chord is usual meant to be more than 2 notes, but it doesn't have to be). "Broken Intervals" would seem to mean 2 note chords with the notes played at slightly different times... like an arpeggio. The term "broken chords" means the same thing, notes played as arpeggios.

    "Arpeggio" for some people might mean playing the notes from the bottom up at a stead tempo. "Broken Chords" (or intervals) is a bit more open term meaning that the pattern and speed of the individual notes may vary as determined by the style of the music.

    And please note the standard disclaimer of..... IMHO
     
  3. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification
    No.

    Broken thirds would mean playing a scale as such : 1 3 2 4 3 5 4 6 5 7 9 8
    4ths would be 1 4 2 5 3 6 4 7 5 8 7 10 8

    Etc, etc.
     
  4. Well, yes, actually it does have to be.
     
  5. Pacman

    Pacman Layin' Down Time Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

    Apr 1, 2000
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Endorsing Artist: Roscoe Guitars, DR Strings, Aguilar Amplification

    Do NOT start this discussion again.
     
  6. BassChuck

    BassChuck

    Nov 15, 2005
    Cincinnati
    I love it when something in music HAS to be something or other.
     
  7. I didn't know we'd had it before. And according to the Norton/Grove Concise Encyclopedia of Music, I'm wrong, so maybe I'll just shut up.
     
  8. Zachass

    Zachass Peavey Partizan

    Got it, thanks Pacman I'll start adding that to the routine. I take it this helps the ear as well as helping you feel the intervals.
     
  9. Howard K

    Howard K

    Feb 14, 2002
    UK
    I'd never heard that terminology before either. Good stuff.
     
  10. Myke Myke

    Myke Myke

    Apr 29, 2008
    Washington DC
    sorry to bump this...
    but what are some advantages of doing broke thirds?
     
  11. Craig_S

    Craig_S Banned

    Oct 15, 2008
    Metro Detroit
    It provides an alternative to playing scales in a linear fashion and breaks patterns and habits created by doing so. It also works your left and right hands together, helping make smooth, precise movement from note to note and string to string second nature.
     
  12. EADG mx

    EADG mx

    Jul 4, 2005
    Actually, it does. If we all got to make our own rules for theory nomenclature, there wouldn't be much of a point in the system existing.
     
  13. Word is we've had this discussion before. :bag:
     
  14. Vocally, this would just be considered singing a scale in thirds, as most people are incapable of using both sets of vocal chords simultaneously, let alone with that degree of control.
     
  15. Myke Myke

    Myke Myke

    Apr 29, 2008
    Washington DC
    thanks for the reply!
     
  16. Dharmabum

    Dharmabum

    Jul 11, 2005
    Richmond, VA
    I'm a huge proponent of practicing scales with broken intervals and have every single one of my students do it.

    It definitely helped me hear the inherent melody in each scale and made my practicing much more musical.

    Also, try practicing melodic phrases based off of broken intervals, ie

    1321 2432 3543 etc