Brutal outdoor gig!

Discussion in 'Bass Humor & Gig Stories [BG]' started by Funkster, Apr 15, 2003.

  1. Funkster


    Apr 6, 2000
    Wormtown, MA
    Oh man what a brutal gig! We played this Harley ralley in Webster MA, It was Horrible after We were threatened and scared we were going to
    be beat up if we didn't play certain songs. The first person we come across wanted to start a fight with our guitar player just for telling him what time we started, they wouldn't even let us in when
    we got there, Then we find out we are playing outside, It didn't get much past 55 degree's all day and we played from 4 to 6, to a bunch of hammered bikers, There highlight of the day was to pull there Harley's in front of the stage to see if there drag pipes were louder than the band, that went on the whole time we played.
    Nobody watched the band they all went inside because they were freezing It was just plain
    awful!! My fingers were dry, cut, cracked, you name it. Just Brutal! we got paid though.
    The best part is they set us up on a tow truck yeah a flatbed tow truck, 8 feet front to back. Our drummer almost fell three times. It was a tough gig.
  2. jcadmus


    Apr 2, 2000
    Maybe the dude just wanted to jam with the band...


    Sorry about the rough gig. Been there. Done that. Hated it.
  3. Did you know that you were playing to the bikers before the gig or was that another hapy surprise?
  4. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Careful - Brad Johnson will come along and say you were complaining (how naughty) and that you should accept all this kind of thing as part of "natural mechanics of a gig"!! ;)

    This is Brad's advice to me on gigs :

    "The "amateur" thing to do would be to whine about it"

    I respectfully disagree!! ;)
  5. Funkster


    Apr 6, 2000
    Wormtown, MA
    Me Too Bruce!!:cool: LOL
  6. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Yup -
    Compalining about bad gigs is the most positive thing you can do.... and the most fun!! :D
  7. Phat Ham

    Phat Ham

    Feb 13, 2000
    The bickering between you two guys already got the other thread shut down. There's no point in hijacking someone else's thread when you know it's just gonna get this one shut down too.

    Back on topic:

    I've played a couple gigs out in the cold and they both sucked. My fingers were frozen and I couldn't play half the stuff I can usually play without even thinking about. It must've been twice as bad having to worry about the bikers beating the crap out of you. By the way, what kind of music do bikers like to listen to?
  8. Funkster


    Apr 6, 2000
    Wormtown, MA
    Ya know! I don't think it mattered wha we played that day, LOL,
    We gave them everything they wanted to hear, Skynyrd, Allmans, Steppenwolf ect, We even did songs we didn't know that they requested, I have played Biker gigs before and have never had a problem, Heck I rode for most of the 80's. I think this was just a bad bunch of people looking for any outsiders to hassle to show the rest of there drunk buddy' how tough they were when in all reality they looked like idiot drunks, The cool people that were there left because of the 20 or so club members that were just so obnoxious to everyone.

    Yes thick_strings we knew! but like I said we have never had a problem like this before with any biker party's we have played in the past, Actually they were all pretty good up to that one.

    Oh well, Thank god it's over and I don't think we'll be doing it again next year no matter how good the pay was.
  9. moley


    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Ah Brad & Bruce, at it again...

    did anyone see that film, Grumpy Old Men? :D
  10. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I think you're probably right and it was poor judgement on my part - but on the other hand, that was the topic!! ;)

    I think most people have had gigs that they want to complain about and have a good old moan to their friends - but some strange people want to say that they see every experience as positive and one that they can take something from - yeah right!! :meh: ;)
  11. moley


    Sep 5, 2002
    Hampshire, UK
    Do you not think that's a pretty good way to see things?
  12. Funkster


    Apr 6, 2000
    Wormtown, MA
    Right Bruce, There was absolutlety nothing positive I could take away from that gig except that we got paid and got out alive with all my gear intact. LOL
    Nuff said! I should have the right to bitch about a terrible gig, and believe me I look forward to every playing experience that I encounter, Until I get threatend to be dragged down the street from the back of a Bike just because we didn't know a specific tune that we played anyway without knowing it in fear.

    Was this a positive experience that we got threatend? was it a positive that this group of lowlifes ruined everybody elses time to a point where most people went home except for this Biker club of about 20?
    I think it's healthy to talk about gigs good or bad, especially when ya come to TB and you find out that other players have encountered the same situations at one time or another.
  13. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    That's right - I wouldn't make a personal attack on you for doing this - it's exactly the sort of thing that fellow musicians talk about when they get together.

    So - I often find myself chatting to friends/musicians in bars or clubs and moaning about terrible gigs and stuff - that's life. In "theory" you should be taking positives from everything but in real life, that just comes across as sanctimonious clap-trap!!

    If you evesdropped on the vast majority of real-life conversation they would be bitching about something...!! ;)
  14. CS


    Dec 11, 1999
    Whilst the general concensus is that everyone complains sometimes and it does help to vent, to me, the pertinent point of the 'complaint' is this

    Some people stoically accept what's dealt to them, others complain and go back for more and others learn from the experience.

    If 'you' (as in anyone reading) continually go back for more punishment, then it's your fault.
  15. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    I don't think it's always that simple - you don't always know what an audience is going to be like or who might happen to turn up.

    If you're playing a regular gig that's the same very time - fine! But if you're playing one-offs, at different venues or events/functions, there isn't necessarily any way to find out and you're not going to turn down a gig, just because you're not sure... :meh:

    So - I'm playing a gig on Saturday at a venue I have been inside but have never played or been to a gig there. Our band has no idea what sort of people will turn up - whether they will dance or walk out. We have no idea what the acoustics will be like - if it will be too crowded or to empty?

    But if it's crap or things go badly wrong I reserve my right to come along and bitch about it here!! ;)
  16. CS


    Dec 11, 1999
    I agree with you entirely, unless your band gets a residency and does a crap gig weekly.
  17. Bruce Lindfield

    Bruce Lindfield Unprofessional TalkBass Contributor Gold Supporting Member

    Well that is never going to happen - so I am safe!! ;)
  18. Funkster


    Apr 6, 2000
    Wormtown, MA

    Same hear I learn my lesson the first time!!
  19. Sundogue


    Apr 26, 2001
    Wausau, WI
    There is no reason a band should have to put up with that, but we've all had to put up with less than ideal things at gigs.

    Complain about it, joke about it...heck, these are the things memories are made of!!! Years from now you can always say, remember when...?

    Also, these things we can use as reference points when booking future gigs. We can't always anticipate all the pitfalls a band may encounter, but as they crop up, we can make notes and think of those things before we sign a contract for any future gig.
  20. Those weren't bikers, bro. Those were lowlifes who just happened to ride motorcycles 'cause they think it makes 'em look cool or bad-azz. They'd be scum-buckets on horseback or in rusted-out POS pickup trucks.

    I ride, and I've played plenty of local joints that cater to bikers as well as the general public. Real bikers are some of the most decent, loyal, and kind folks you'd ever meet, and make for a damned good audience. Don't let that bad experience turn you off from playing for real biker crowds.

    vasilio likes this.