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BTS System Problem

Discussion in 'Pickups & Electronics [BG]' started by dirtybasslines, Feb 29, 2008.


  1. dirtybasslines

    dirtybasslines

    Feb 19, 2008
    Hey all,
    Would anyone be able to help me out? I'm installing a BTS system into a toby-pro 5 and I've got an issue... I needed a long-shaft output jack, so i used the one that came stock with my Tobias. I've wired the ground to the outer most lug, but my question is which of the two inner most lugs needs to be hot and battery? One seems to be slightly longer than the other if that helps. but it looks like this: \ _ / The bottom one being the one I grounded.

    Also, if anyone is familiar with the toby pro-wiring, can you tell me what the small black wire going into what looks like the bridge is for?? I assumed it was a grounding wire so I think I should solder it to pot with a grounding wire soldered to it as well??

    Any help would be awesome.

    Thanks,
    DB
     
  2. A stereo switch has two prongs on the inside, one longer than the other. Test to figure out which lug corresponds to which prong, and then wire the signal to the longer prong's lug and the battery to the remaining lug.
     
  3. luknfur

    luknfur

    Jan 14, 2004
    DIXIE
    The long jack is called a flushmount jack. With no wires connected to the jack, take a meter and measure continuity between the jack face and the terminals. The one that yields are reading is ground. Then plug in the guitar chord in and touch one meter lead to the tip and the other to the jack terminals. The one with continuity will be the hot lead. The remaining terminal will for battery negative. Flushmount jack terminals have no rhyme or reason in my experience so a meter or trial and error is the only way to know otherwise and if you run the battery negative to the ground terminal it will drain the battery caue the pre will always be on.

    A wire routed to the bridge is ground and typically is soldered to a pot back - or ground ring for star grounding.
     

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