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Building A bass

Discussion in 'Luthier's Corner' started by jtabraham, Oct 2, 2008.


  1. jtabraham

    jtabraham

    Oct 2, 2008
    Hey, I am in high school and i am building a bass in my woodshop class. I was wondering what would be the best wood to use. I want the wood to be really light colored and i was going to make everything else black. And what kind of wood be good for the neck. I was thinking of going all maple.
     
  2. hockey_head

    hockey_head

    Feb 25, 2008
    what woods are avaliable to you to choose from?
     
  3. jtabraham

    jtabraham

    Oct 2, 2008
    Any wood i want? I buying the wood myself.
     
  4. lowbass68

    lowbass68

    Feb 3, 2008
    For a first bass, you can't go wrong using maple for the neck. If your painting the body, alder is good.
     
  5. Do you mean online or at your local Home Depot (etc.)?

    Also, what kind of tone do you want this bass to have? Do you want it to have a dark, chunky P-Bass tone or a crisp, Music-Man kind of tone?

    This is all crucial.
     
  6. lightbulbjim

    lightbulbjim

    Mar 17, 2008
    Australia
    All Maple will be somewhat heavy. You're probably better off with something like Swamp Ash or Alder for the body, Maple is good for the neck. That's a starting point anyway, and they're all light coloured woods.

    BUT, I would really be asking this question in the Luthier's Corner, you'll get much more information. Link: http://www.talkbass.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=57
     
  7. jtabraham

    jtabraham

    Oct 2, 2008
    Is it possible to have black frets?
     
  8. lug

    lug

    Feb 11, 2005
    League City, Tx
    If you don't mind the heavy weight, use the Maple. Kinda rare in bass bodies and can't think of any that are very economically priced. The two main that come to mind are Ricenbackers and Spectors. BTW, I built my first bass in woodshop back in 1974...out of maple. :D
     
  9. Rugaar

    Rugaar

    Apr 11, 2007
    wisconsin
    Very cool! Keep us posted on how this goes for you!
     
  10. jtabraham

    jtabraham

    Oct 2, 2008
    I was wondering what would be the best pickups and preamps. I want soapbars.
     
  11. jtabraham

    jtabraham

    Oct 2, 2008
    Also what is the difference between Satin and Clear gloss? I want the bass to have a flat look.
     
  12. jimmy rocket

    jimmy rocket

    Jan 24, 2008
    Ayden, NC
    Are you sure you're ready for this???
     
  13. UncleBalsamic

    UncleBalsamic

    Jul 8, 2007
    UK
    No. There are no (as far as I know) black frets that you can buy.
     
  14. jtabraham

    jtabraham

    Oct 2, 2008
    I'm ready and i am ready to spent as much money as needed
     
  15. alexis=bassist

    alexis=bassist

    Sep 4, 2008

    hey jisen is that u?!:hyper:
     
  16. jtabraham

    jtabraham

    Oct 2, 2008
    yes, hey alexis. i needed some help on building the bass.
     
  17. Mark Wilson

    Mark Wilson Supporting Member

    Jan 12, 2005
    Toronto, Ontario
    Endorsing Artist: Elixir® Strings
    I'm gonna toss this over to the cats in Luthier's Corner.
     
  18. XylemBassGuitar

    XylemBassGuitar Supporting Member Commercial User

    Aug 14, 2008
    Durango, CO
    Owner and Operator, Xylem Handmade Basses and Guitars
    jtabraham,

    Maple is a great wood for the neck. I would strongly recommend using quartersawn rock maple for the neck. Using quartersawn wood for the neck will help maintain its stability and may help prevent some common neck warping/twisting issues.

    Enjoy your first build!
     
  19. use ash or alder. maple for the neck. ebony fretboard. I think one thing that every single person on here will agree on is you need to buy and read a guitar building book. Personally I read Martin Koch's Building Electric Guitars, but I have also heard raving reviews of Melvyn Hiscocks book too. I highly recommend doing so. Satin finishes are with no shine; highlighting the qualities of the wood, Clear gloss; if finished properly can look and feel like glass giving a mirror like finish.
     
  20. eleonn

    eleonn

    Aug 24, 2006
    Lima - Perú
    Ive read both and I think that both are a must before touch even a single piece of wood. Both a great and complement each other.
     

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