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Building a lighter TL606

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs [BG]' started by Sequimite, Aug 10, 2012.


  1. Having very slowly learned a little bit about a variety of subjects on this forum I wish to embark on a new sea of ignorance.

    I want to build a speaker cabinet and thought I would start with a simple one, the ubiquitous TL-606. I have been unable to find any plans other than the original EV one nor anyone who has tried to build a lighter version. So let me know if you are aware of a successful lighter version and what you think of my idea for a lighter version:

    Given that the original plan uses 3/4" plywood, I propose cutting the five sides (sixth is the baffle) out of 1/4" and 1/2" plywood, cutting a grid of 3" holes in the 1/2" with a hole saw, then gluing each perforated 1/2" panel to the respective 1/4" panel. The very attractive circular pattern will be on the outside and I do plan on using Duratex.

    Aside from the aesthetic considerations do those of you with cabinetry expertise think this is a sound plan?
     
  2. rpsands

    rpsands

    Jul 6, 2007
    Phoenix, AZ
    Why not just use 1/2" plywood instead and adjust the plans?
     
  3. Because I haven't found anyone else who has tried doing that. Not having any relevant experience I was loath to abandon the rigidity of 3/4" without a 1/2" success story. It seems like the obvious thing to do but the dozens of people and companies, like Mesa and Dietz, who I have found that built these all used 3/4".
     
  4. Blues Bass 2

    Blues Bass 2 Supporting Member

    Oct 3, 2001
    Davenport Iowa
    Do it in 1/2" like RP mentioned and add more braces . Cut some of the 1/2" in 1 1/2' strips and glue in edgewise every 6 " or so to take the resonence out of the panels . Mesa and Eden and Ampeg and the like use 3/4" because they don't think they have to brace it as much .
     
  5. rpsands

    rpsands

    Jul 6, 2007
    Phoenix, AZ
    Several guys have built 1/2" TL-606's on the forum. You need to add some intelligent bracing but that's it.
     
  6. ::::BASSIST::::

    ::::BASSIST:::: Progress Not Perfection.

    Sep 2, 2004
    Vancouver, BC Canada
    If you REALLy dont want to go 1/2 inch try using Italian Poplar ply that will definitely save weight. Personally, I'd still want the extra bracing with IP though.

    1/2inch with IP an lots of bracing will give you best weight to performance ratio. I built my fEARful 15/6 out of 1/2 inch IP and it only weighed 43LBS... only 4LBS heavier than my fibreglass 15/6 which is 39LBS. Can't beat that!
     
  7. The one specific recommendation for bracing 1/2" plywood was a 1 1/2" wide strip every 6 inches. Anyone disagree?

    The only 1/2" build I saw was a 215 that used perpendicular bracing in routed slots. I'd rather not try that.
     
  8. You still should have front to back, side to side and top to bottom braces to keep a 1/2" cab tight.
     
  9. correapa

    correapa

    Jan 24, 2010
    Santiago, Chile
    I'm currrently ending a Mesa Diesel 1x15 replica, based in the TL-606 design. Outer dimensions are 49 cm Height, 43.2 cm Depth and 60.3 cm Wide. You can convert it to inches. Since I live in Chile, I used Arauco multiuse 3/4" plywood (it weights 9.2 kg/m2 or 1.9 lb/sqf).
    Avoid ALL the structure in the EV design, It is useless, just glue and clamps.
    I ve already tried the whole cab in the bath scale and it wieghts 22.1 kgs (49 lbs) with an Eminence Kappalite 3015 woofer, original grill and everything included.
    As soon as I finish it, I will post pics, just in case ..........

    Hope this is what you were looking for.
     
  10. I think you are gonna have a lot of guys disagreeing with you that the bracing is useless.
     
  11. Some like their amps to rattle their cabs instead of putting out sound I guess? :eek: :)
     
  12. The 3/4" TL-606 plan doesn't have any bracing. It has a fir frame used to attach the butt jointed panels together. I've run into a number of builders who eliminated the firring by using a better joinery method - several used biscuits.
     
  13. even with thicker plywood I would want a better bracing scheme. At 1/2 ply its a must.
     
  14. ::::BASSIST::::

    ::::BASSIST:::: Progress Not Perfection.

    Sep 2, 2004
    Vancouver, BC Canada
    I bet if you add the bracing it will sound better, more focused lows.

    1.5 x .5 ply bracing is not going to add much weight... especially if you go with light wood.

    My .02.
     
  15. bobcruz

    bobcruz

    Mar 10, 2004
    CA
    I just built a pair of neo 112s in 12 mm "Sande" plywood from Central America that I got at my local Home Depot. Nice light ply with a very even grain that wouldn't look bad oiled or varnished but I plan to cover them in tolex. They're 21x15.25x14.5 inches with cross bracing side to side, top to bottom and front to back, and all bracing glued together where they intersect. It wasn't that difficult to do once I borrowed a bunch of clamps to supplement the clamps I have. Glued it all up with PL Premium and butt joints, no fancy biscuits or dadoes. With 4-pound Eminence Basslites, the one without a tweeter weighs 19.5 pounds and the one with tweeter and crossover weighs 20.5 pounds. Cross bracing is the way to go. Just take your time, it's worth it to build something right if you're going to build at all.
     
  16. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    Being charitable, I suppose your laminatecidea could be interesting from anaesthetic point of view. It is essentially worthless otherwide IMO. Review the fearful construction method and apply those the the 606 dimensions using 12mm BB ply. You'll have a better box. Then you can use some sitck on circles over a base coat of paint, spray on your contasting color and get then spots affect w/o the essentially useless extra weight...
     
  17. Thanks, I'll check the plywood and cross-bracing makes more sense to me. What width were your braces?

    add- believe it or not, Sequim has a Home Depot! And the boat building supply stores in Port Townsend have the fancier stuff.
     
  18. At last a comment on my scheme - that it is "worthless"; and that's being "charitable"!

    Well I'm a curmudgeon too so I may have to build it just to prove you wrong.
     
  19. bobcruz

    bobcruz

    Mar 10, 2004
    CA
    They were either 1-1/4 or 1-1/2 inches by 12 mm, cut from scraps of the Sande plywood. Sorry I can't recall exactly since it's been a few weeks since I cut them and I didn't record that spec. They were very light and stiff. Two of them attach to the side where I screwed the lightweight strap handle on each cab and I used longish (maybe 1-1/2 or 2 inch) wood screws so that the handles' screws bite into the braces, eliminating the need for T-nuts and machine screws for the handles. I also used wood screws to hold the drivers and jack plates. Since 12 mm (about 15/32 of an inch, just under 1/2") ply is thin for wood screws I glued additional small chunks of plywood wherever a wood screw was needed and used 1-inch wood screws from PartsExpress.com to hold the drivers and jack plates. I used 3/4" square poplar dowels from Home Depot to frame the grills and stapled oxblood grill cloth to them, since I've found that cloth grills save about a pound for each cab in this size compared to steel, and I baby my cabs. I chose every component with weight reduction in mind due to recent back issues. The poplar dowels would have made fine cross braces but since I had excess plywood I used it for the dowels to save expense.
     
  20. 4Mal

    4Mal Supporting Member

    Jun 2, 2002
    Columbia River Gorge
    Go for it dude. It's your cab....
     

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