Busted nut on Fender Precison

Discussion in 'Basses [BG]' started by deluxeg, Dec 6, 2002.

  1. deluxeg


    May 5, 2001
    I bought a new Fender Precision Deluxe bass in August of this year (2002) and last week while at practice and we were playing "earth angel" and I go down to hit my G string and it just slips off the fretboard, so I look at the bass and I notice that the nut broke right at the G string slot. During the previous song the bass was fine. I was wondering if you guys think this would be covered under fenders warranty or not.
  2. ZuluFunk

    ZuluFunk Supporting Member

    Apr 14, 2001
    Nope...I've never done that.
  3. Turock

    Turock Supporting Member

    Apr 30, 2000
    You should clean that up immediately.
  4. I thought that too turock.. we's be nastay

  5. Fender will usually cover this under waranty as long as you haven't changed the string gauge. By letter of the law once you change the string gauge you have "modified " the bass
  6. BruceWane


    Oct 31, 2002
    Houston, TX
    Boy, that sounds painful.:eek:

    I've banged a nut pretty hard on the top bar of a bicycle frame, but never actually busted one. They still seem to work....

    Maybe you should wear a cup........
  7. embellisher

    embellisher Holy Ghost filled Bass Player Staff Member Supporting Member

    You guys are terrible!:D
  8. deluxeg


    May 5, 2001
    The topic was worded like that on purpose, it is now a running joke in my band to tell people that I busted my nut during practice, with no further explanation.
  9. deluxeg


    May 5, 2001
    oh, i used Ernie Ball strings in the pink package if that matters.
  10. jcadmus


    Apr 2, 2000
    And I'm thinking...


    Sounds like a dandy opportunity to have a brass nut installed. That would make a nice addition to your P-bass.
  11. How could you bust a nut with Ernie Balls?
  12. JOME77

    JOME77 Supporting Member

    Aug 18, 2002
    You can buy a Fender Precision bone nut for $6.99 (retail) from most any Fender dealer (P/N 099-4921-000). Just remove the remaining portion of the old nut by tapping on either end of the nut with a flat file (with a width slightly less than the nut). Clean out the slot (old glue and any remaining nut material) and put a small amount of Elmers white glue in the slot prior to installing the new nut. If the nut string slots are not quite as deep as you like, you may have to get a luthier to cut the slots to the desired depth.
    It's probably not worth the hastle of having to deal with Fender.
  13. *thinks of a line from the movie Clerks...*