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Buster Williams recordings

Discussion in 'Recordings [DB]' started by hdiddy, Aug 26, 2004.


  1. hdiddy

    hdiddy Official Forum Flunkee Supporting Member

    Mar 16, 2004
    San Francisco, CA
    Hey guys,

    It's homework time again. :help: What good records can I find with Buster William's on it... he doesn't have many where he's the leader AFAIK. I'm looking for some good 2 feel playing too. Thanks!

    macdiddy
     
  2. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Check out all the SPHERE stuff and a nice Eddie Harris record called THERE WAS A TIME...
     
  3. Michael Glynn

    Michael Glynn

    Feb 25, 2004
    Seattle
    If you want to hear some of his earlier playing, check out Boss Tenors with Gene Ammons and Sonny Stitt. In my opinion, it's one of the most swingin albums of all time. Buster isn't even 20 years old on it, but he sounds incredible. There is some nice 2 feel on a couple tracks. And you can't go wrong with Jug and Stitt!

    Michael
     
  4. kwd

    kwd

    Jun 26, 2003
    silicon valley
    I was introduced to Buster Williams on the Freddie Hubbard date Outpost. It might only be available as an import now. His sound is bigger than ever on that recording.
     
  5. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Don't get me wrong, I think Buster sounds great. I been listening to him almost since I started listening to jazz (or a while I was listening to fusion, I had SEXTANT during that period).

    But if I played alla that clickety clackety stop and go slip slidy stuff on a gig, I think I would get a buncha funny looks.
     
  6. Yeah it's true...but he comes by it honestly what with all that hangin' with Ron Carter....Did you ever see that album cover of a picture of the band playing live somewhere...Ron is playing that piccolo thing and Buster on bass....They both have got on these pretty bizarre hats. I guess they belonged to a hat club or something.
    While we're on Buster, is that bass he plays a Hawkes? I've always wondered....It's been restored and refinished with a different color, but the pattern sure looks Panormo-like.
    I've tried to talk to him on some European tours we did together back in the 80's, but he wasn't interested.
     
  7. ctxbass

    ctxbass Supporting Member

    Nov 6, 2003
    Central Texas
    "Asante". Buster Williams w/ Mcoy Tyner, 1970, Blue Note. Check out the bass on "Goin' Home". Far from a 2 feel, but worth a listen.
     
  8. bass_means_LOW

    bass_means_LOW

    Apr 12, 2004
    Las Vegas
    Buster's own CD put out about 10+ years ago, "Something New" or "Something More" includes the Japanese trumpeter that hangs around him, Hancock on piano and tastey synth patches, Mr Shorter's great soprano work and Al Foster on drums. Real mashin' arrangement of "I Didn't Know What Time It Was." Sounds most often like Buster goes direct. By the looks of his bass, don't know why he doesn't have more mix on his f hole. Never asked him what kind of bass he plays. He's got that "high steppin" walk. He swings/cuts the quarter note deeper than triplets-more like a dotted 8th/16th note feel-quite bouncy at times.
     
  9. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Yeah, it's a Hawkes. I don't know if that's his only bass though. I got to meet him at Gage's while he was having some work done and he's a real nice guy, very open and willing to talk to somebody he dint know from Adam, just walked in off the street.

    About Buster's sound - I had always assumed it was a low-action-lots-of-amp sound, but I heard SPHERE a couple of years back at the Vanguard and Buster had a problem with his amp. It kept shorting out (little powet light kept going out) and coming back on. Finally in the middle of a solo it just cut out completely. Buster's volume dropped just the tiniest bit, but the quality of sound didn't change at all, still sounded just like on all those records.

    which just reinforces my feeling that what comes OUT of the amp is what goes IN the amp.

    BASS LOA - is that Shunzo Ono?
     
  10. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    I had a master class and a few lesson s with buster while i was college back in the 80s'. Cool cat and good teacher. I agree about the slippy slidy stuff tho.
     
  11. bass_means_LOW

    bass_means_LOW

    Apr 12, 2004
    Las Vegas
    The CD's name is "Something More."
    Yeah, that's the guy. Has a solo CD on Sony Japan with Grady Tate and Buster-very polished-Shunzo sings most of the songs.
    Re: Buster; (stories) Someone told me a long time ago he played with Basie without an amp.
    Then again he was in Herbie's first "fusion based" group along with Bennie Maupin, Billy Hart, and Eddie Henderson. All the guys used their African names. Another guy that just happens to have the same last name, David Williams is out of the same ilk as Sam Jones-Ron Carter-Buster Williams.
     
  12. Just curious...I can see you calling Ron and Buster an "ilk", but on what did you base your inclusion of Sam Jones in there?
     
  13. godoze

    godoze

    Oct 21, 2002
    Sam is my main man !
     
  14. Ya know as Miles and Jim Hall, among others, have talked about letting the music speak for itself, if we did that, we wouldn't get very far on this Board...So...I'll use a label that may confuse some of you...Stylist. I actually consider Ron and Buster "bass stylists"
    I don't consider Sam a stylist. This isn't a slam on Ron and Buster, it's just a label/pidgeon-hole kinda thing I came up with.
    Before everybody starts yelling and getting upset, think about it.
     
  15. Ed Fuqua

    Ed Fuqua

    Dec 13, 1999
    NYC
    Chuck Sher publishes my book, WALKING BASSICS:The Fundamentals of Jazz Bass Playing.
    Lessee, if I can get this on
    [​IMG]

    That's Ned Otter on tenor, Shunzo on trumpet, Steve Jackson on drums (he's in a tux cause it was his wedding), me and Jamie Fox on guitar.
     
  16. bass_means_LOW

    bass_means_LOW

    Apr 12, 2004
    Las Vegas
    That's a wonderful photo, Mr Fuqua.
    Sam Jones is a major influence in my playing. He introduced Ron Carter to the jazz community by doing an album with him,
    "Sam Jones; Introducing Ron Carter" making this Mr Carter's first. He played with Mr Evans, Mr Davis and countless others. Mr Jones stepped into the big shoes of Ray Brown by playing in the Oscar Peterson trio after Mr Brown left. He laid down great tracks with the Eastern Rebellion, and his work in larger ensemble with Bob Berg. His tremendous drive and hardbop history is certainly apparent when listening to tracks of the Cedar Walton Trio. I included Mr Jones in my masters thesis of "styles" and performance practices of three bassists.
    "ilk" was not the appropriate word and I stand corrected; "walking similarities" would be more my intent. It's in the way he approaches the quarter note which is evident in all his work, but especially his walking solo in "The Old Country." I hear Mr Jones' walking to be very "bluesy" and with a big heart. When hearing Mr Williams and Mr Carter I sometimes think they and many others were influenced by Mr Jones but upon reflection, their similarities possibly stop there. (Everyone is entitled to an opinion. Please give me yours.)
     
  17. Yeah, Sam's time and spirit, to me was what his playing was all about. And, of course, all that stuff he did with the Adderly's was great.
    Another guys that was always #1 in everybody's book as far as a great sound, time feel and spirit goes is Percy Heath. Percy was one of Bill Evans favorite bass players believe it or don't!!
     
  18. bass_means_LOW

    bass_means_LOW

    Apr 12, 2004
    Las Vegas
    Yeah, I can believe it. (Off the main topic of discussion, but in the flow of context.) Actually Chuck Israels told me he and Evans were talking about forming a trio even before Scotty died.

    Actually, Chuck goes back. July, 1959, Le Chat Qui Peche, Paris, France; Bud Powell, Israels, and J. T Hogan, drums.
    The following is from a book; "Dance of the Infidels: A Portrait of Bud Powell" by Francis Paudras, Da Capo Books, 1998.

    "Bud was playing with Chuck Israels and J. T. Hogan. The trio pulsated like a red-hot locomotive. The tension was enormous, the density of sound unbelievable. Bud's fingers set off thunderbolts. During these electrifying evenings, there were hardly any ballads and one tune followed another in a relentless tempo."

    Evans continually gave kudos to Bud.
    If you haven't read it, this book is a must read for any player!