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Cables?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous [BG]' started by Ryan K, Feb 1, 2003.


  1. Ryan K

    Ryan K

    Dec 11, 2002
    New Jersey
    I have notices...around here anyway...that people really do overlook cable quality. Being only a beginning bassist...I have had a fender electrovolt and some other crappy cables and have noticed a considerable difference in sound quality. I just wanted to ask most of the experienced people around here if they have any cable advice they could lend me to know the truth about cables...
     
  2. leanne

    leanne

    May 29, 2002
    Rochester, NY
    I think good cables are pretty important, there's less noise, and they seem less likely to crap out. And Monster will replace (for life) your cable if it stops working or if you break it.

    I don't see any reason to waste money on a cheap one ever again. :)
     
  3. Cantstandsya

    Cantstandsya

    Jul 27, 2001
    Fontana, CA
    Quantum Audio cables are the best i've tried.IMO they sound better than the $100 monster cables and are very reasonably priced.............
     
  4. bassackwards

    bassackwards Member

    Dec 16, 2002
    OREGON
    I recently re-cabled my entire bass and guitar effects rigs and my rack with George L's. The guy at GC couldn't find the price on the plugs and I told him they were 1.50 each:D. So, I took the opportunity to buy all I could need. No complaints! Good stuff. I've been using George L's on one of my pedalboards for over a year and not a single problem yet. Haven't tried much else, but George L's are pretty good.
     
  5. JMX

    JMX Vorsprung durch Technik

    Sep 4, 2000
    Cologne, Germany
    There was a very thorough test of instrument cables in a German magazine a few months back, with very detailed measurements.

    Result: Only very little difference in impedance, capacity etc. - as long as you use good quality cable and plugs (e.g. Neutrik) you have the same sonic quality as with a Monster Cable. The only thing they got going for them is the warranty.
    Some of their claims are total nonsense in terms of physics [e.g. Time Correct windings].
    I recommend making your own cables with Neutriks and a decent cable.
    Total cost: around 15 bucks.

    edited for typos
     
  6. i have a monster cable that was defective, and i can tell you their customer service is great and they were determined to make things right. that said, i prefer my planet waves cable. it also has a lifetime guarantee and it's more flexible. also the monster bass cable shapes the sound a little, the highs seem to drop off slightly. i know a lot of people who would dig that but it's not my style.
     
  7. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    I reckon the big problem with cables is that not many people roll them up correctly. That's how they become noisy and/or broken.
     
  8. what's the correct way to roll em?
     
  9. Petebass

    Petebass

    Dec 22, 2002
    QLD Australia
    oh boy this one is hard to explain in written words. Normally when people ask me I show them......

    Maybe ask your sound engineer at your next gig, they've usually got a good handle on it. It's kinda roll one loop over, one loop under - that probably makes no sense until someone shows it to you.

    It's a good method coz it preserves the leads and it also stops them from tangling up.
     
  10. lneal

    lneal

    Apr 12, 2002
    Lee County, Alabama
    BINGO!!

    You should roll your cables into a coil about 10-12" in diameter, being careful to keep them unkinked. If you have to stretch them out occasionally and run the kinks out, then do it. DON"T let someone else roll them up unless they can do it the right way. I cringe when I see someone wrapping the cable around their forearm between the elbow and the palm. eeewwwwwwwww...

    **skin crawls**
     
  11. tim4003

    tim4003

    Apr 30, 2002
    Dawsonville , GA
    Planet Waves work for me.
     
  12. Tsal

    Tsal

    Jan 28, 2000
    Finland, EU
    I've had bit poor experience with Whirlwind cables: their top-of-the-line model Leader was broken when I bought it, and when I emailed their tech support, I never got any response.

    They claim they will replace your broken cable but I'm yet to send it to the States so well see how that goes.
     
  13. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    Amen to that!

    I've been using Horizon, Whirlwind, and ProCo cables for years with no problems at all. Same with the three Guitar Center promo cables. No failures, and they didn't cost much.

    A nice lady at George L's booth at NAMM gave me a sample cable, and it's been fine, too.
     
  14. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    I think you're absolutely right.

    The way you roll up your cable shouldn't put any strain or twists on it, and the bends should be gentle (that's why you should roll it into a large-diameter coil--about 8 to 10 inches or more).
     
  15. I'm going to wire up and make a pedalboard. I know George Ls are reputable for guitars but you're happy with them for bass too?
     
  16. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    Hey, why wouldn't they be good for bass, too? A couple nice things about George Ls for a pedal board are that the cable is thin and flexible, and you can make custom lengths.
     
  17. thrash_jazz

    thrash_jazz

    Jan 11, 2002
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Artist: JAF Basses, Circle K Strings
    What's wrong with doing this? :eek:

    I'm not challenging you - I'm just curious. How does this cause kinks in the cable? My forearm is only a bit longer than 12" anyway.

    If there is a way to avoid good ole "cable spaghetti"... do tell... I hate that!
     
  18. Rock&Roll

    Rock&Roll

    Jul 21, 2002
    USA
    Good cables: Everly

    gernerally the best sounding cables have a low capicitance. I use 20' cables with less than 30 pico-farads per foot. The everly's have slightly more capacitance than this. They sound noticibly less muddy than the average cable. Usually runs about $1 per foot for low capacitance cable with 1/4 inch jacks already installed
     
  19. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    Hi Adam,

    Coiling your cable that way forces kinks and twists into the cable and also can put tensional strain on the wire. This can cause the individual strands in the shield and the inner conductor to break.

    Put one end of your cable in the open palm of your left hand (assuming you're right-handed; switch if you're a lefty) and hold it with your thumb. Grasp about a foot and a half to two feet down the cable and place it over your open palm, forming a loop about 6 to 8 inches in diameter; make sure there are no twists in the cable. Hold that loop of the cable with your thumb and do it again and again until you have the entire cable coiled up with no undue strains on it.

    Once you have that down, it's easy to do it quickly; when you use it, be sure to uncoil the cable in a gentle way also. And you can learn the over-under method, too, to make it easier to uncoil the cable without twists. I'd have to think about how to describe the over-under method before I can tell you how to do it. ;) It would be easier to just show you.
     
  20. Bob Lee (QSC)

    Bob Lee (QSC) In case you missed it, I work for QSC Audio! Gold Supporting Member Commercial User

    Jul 3, 2001
    Costa Mesa, Calif.
    Technical Communications Developer, QSC Audio
    Even fairly run-of-the-mill instrument cables have low enough capacitance that they'll have minimal effect on the high-end response of a bass system, even with a passive instrument (active instruments are largely immune to the shunt capacitance of a cable). But the cable's effect on the tone is tiny compared to the effect of a passive bass's tone control, which can more than compensate for the cable.