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Can anyone ID this bridge?

Discussion in 'Hardware, Setup & Repair [BG]' started by L-1329, Apr 24, 2005.


  1. L-1329

    L-1329

    Aug 8, 2004
    Looks for all the world like a Schaller Roller bridge with one big difference in the height adjustment. This one has the whole saddle assembly sitting on top of a 'ramp', and the adjustment screw pulls the ramp into the saddle to raise the action. Does not have the small hex screw height adjusters on the top of the saddle assemblies that I see on current roller bridges. Is this a discontinued model, or perhaps something made to gibson specs? For the record this is a 23 year old bass, but I sure would like to find another one of these for one of my other basses. Here are a couple of pics. Would appreciate any info if anyone has ever seen one of these before.

    http://home.earthlink.net/~tom303/s...bridge_side.jpg

    http://home.earthlink.net/~tom303/s.../bridge_top.jpg
     
  2. I tried the links below, but I got the "cannot locate" message. It might be me because I'm not interested in computers, but you might check the address.
     
  3. L-1329

    L-1329

    Aug 8, 2004
    Hmmm... Let me try to link the pic.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. L-1329

    L-1329

    Aug 8, 2004
    Here is the top view...
    [​IMG]
     
  5. I think you're right. My bet would be that this was made by Schaller for Gibson. A clue would be to look under the bridge. All of the real Schaller stuff I've worked with has "Made in Germany" cast into the bottom of the chassis. It might be worth a try.

    BTW, I've been toying with that same elevation method in a design for a bridge. I thought it hadn't been done before. Oh, well... :rolleyes:
     
  6. L-1329

    L-1329

    Aug 8, 2004
    Thanks, I will try that next time I have the strings off. And this type of system is great, use it if you can. It's the reason I want another one for another bass of mine. The saddle has a lot of direct contact with the 'ramp' through to the base of the bridge, and I think is the biggest reason for the great sustain this old bass has. Much more precise, and certainly transmits more string energy than just two tiny hex screws...
     
  7. Gibson used those bridges on the Explorer re-issues and some of the late seventies/early to mid eighties models. They made some one-offs with piezos built into the saddles. I had an Explorer re-issue with the piezos and no magnetic pickups. Those models (like the RD's and Victories) didn't sell very well but some of them sound and play well. I've got an RD Standard that sounds unreal, but it's heavy. It seems like Gibson was always a few degrees off when it came to basses in the marketplace.