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Can anyone tell what’s wrong with the E string?

Discussion in 'Strings [BG]' started by vgbassman, May 1, 2019.


  1. vgbassman

    vgbassman

    Jan 16, 2016
    NJ
    Hey guys,
    This is a relatively new (that’s what I was told) set of Labella medium flats (0.49 G string) that came with bass I just bought...
    They sound pretty good except for the E string which sounds “dead” or “muddy” as compared to the other three... if you look at the E string in the picture, it has an interesting pattern... (light/dark/light/)...
    Thoughts?
    ... and if I needed to just replace the E string... possible?

    Thank you

    Vik
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: May 1, 2019
  2. ixlramp

    ixlramp

    Jan 25, 2005
    UK
    The appearence is just the effect of the inner round wrap wire layers of differing gauges going in and out of phase and creating a slight ripple in string diameter, the flat ribbon makes this ripple more visually noticeable.
    EDIT: Wrong, see below.

    Strings came with the bass ... there's your answer, buy a new set. Replacing just the E will result in unmatching strings again.
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2019
    MynameisMe likes this.
  3. It's not uncommon for a flatwound set to have an E string that's "deader" than the rest. They are SUPPOSED TO balance out eventually, but that's not always the case.

    Check out this thread: New La Bella Strings Has Blotchy Spots
     
  4. ixlramp

    ixlramp

    Jan 25, 2005
    UK
    Thanks, so LaBella confirmed it is due to something else:

    "Hi Derek - From time to time, these marks will appear. Those marks are "highlights" in the metal that happen in the metal extrusion / drawing process that are revealed when we polish and buff the strings by hand. The "highlights" will not affect the tone of the string."
     
  5. vgbassman

    vgbassman

    Jan 16, 2016
    NJ
    Well, the plan is to get a new set... but the seller told me that he had just put on this set, the other three strings are pretty darn good; just the E string is dead... yes, it’s not just cosmetically blemished as per Labella, but the string is dead sounding as well...

    Strings came with the bass ... there's your answer, buy a new set. Replacing just the E will result in unmatching strings again.[/QUOTE]
     
  6. /\/\3phist0

    /\/\3phist0 Life: It's sexually transmitted and always fatal Supporting Member

    E strings in a set of unseasoned flats esp labellas start out deader. They even out as they age and mellow.

    Chromes are more even but brighter and more scooped.
     
  7. GIBrat51

    GIBrat51 Innocent as the day is long Supporting Member

    Mar 5, 2013
    Lost Wages, Nevada
    Assuming the E string isn't twisted, broken, hasn't had the witness points set - or actually is really a dead string? Yeah, as others have said, it's pretty common for a flatwound E string to start out "deader" than the others. It's also fairly common for the A,D, and G strings to be much brighter than you'd think new flatwounds should be. If things go as they normally do, however, the E will brighten up, and the other strings will get... well, less bright. When they meet in the middle? That's how you know they're broken in, and they should stay in that happy state for a good long while...:whistle:
     
    vgbassman and Garret Graves like this.
  8. vgbassman

    vgbassman

    Jan 16, 2016
    NJ
    Thanks to all for all the help.
    I guess I will just keep playing and wait for it to even out...
    I still feel that a new string should not be "dead" out of the box and I am not certain I am really impressed by the response by Labella to Derek as quoted above from another thread. In today's world of quality control, they could do better...
    On the other hand, these strings are amazing and I guess "dead" strings happen... not the end of the world. :thumbsup:
     
  9. FunkHead

    FunkHead Supporting Member

    Mar 10, 2007
    Is this bass a Short-scale?
     
  10. vgbassman

    vgbassman

    Jan 16, 2016
    NJ
    No... 34"
     
  11. FunkHead

    FunkHead Supporting Member

    Mar 10, 2007
    Hmm, for some reason I thought the .49 G string was only part of the short scale set.
     
  12. vgbassman

    vgbassman

    Jan 16, 2016
    NJ
    I'm talking about this set...

    upload_2019-5-5_22-41-4.png
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2019
  13. FunkHead

    FunkHead Supporting Member

    Mar 10, 2007
    I would check if the E string is twisted. If you loosen the tuner up, then you can pull the string towards the ball end and see if it twists back.
     

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