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Can I play the way I feel is comfortable for myself?

Discussion in 'Technique [BG]' started by Travisx2112, Sep 30, 2008.


  1. +1 There truly is no incorrect way to play music. However, there are techniques that seem to work best for most. Embracing proven methods can have its advantages. If you honestly believe your method will work in the long run, go for it. Feel free to experiment. How you play is a decision you have to make and you will have to live with.
     
  2. gregh

    gregh

    Sep 15, 2008
    I found you youtube account and had a look at your style. It's unusual but you sound great. My points would be - firstly, in sport there is a trend away from the idea that there is one way to perform and more towards the idea of taking someone's natural style and refining and modifying it to maximise performance. Secondly there are many instruments that use a linear method of playing - the most commonly known would be the sitar. I think you are fine taking what you have developed and expanding upon it. Introducing more fingers and restricted positional playing is probably a good idea, but I don't see why you have to do that as a way of correcting your playing, but rather as a way of expanding the really good skills you already have.

    Also I agree with whoever has suggested trying a fretless - could be fantastic :)
     
  3. Ramstien

    Ramstien

    Aug 19, 2007
    Perth
    He's not famous.
     
  4. bassbully

    bassbully Endorsed by The PHALEX CORN BASS..mmm...corn!

    Sep 7, 2006
    Blimp City USA
    Heck its your style your music your way . Keep it yours and be proud of the way you play. Dont let people get into your head and tell you how to play if it feels good do it. I rarely use my fretting hand pinky. I think its cuz i am left handed but i play right and i have trouble using it? Big deal unless i am in the first posistion i dont need it. Flea said in an interview he doesnt use his pinky much.

    Ya the books teach you proper hand tech etc. They also show you where to wear a bass etc but guys wear them high or slam them low. A pick was a sin on bass but now its ok to most. Just like when we all took Driver Ed class we where taught to sit up both hands on the wheel etc etc...ya that lasted long :rolleyes: I can't remember the name of the famous piano player who instead of playing with his hands arched and playing with his fingertips used to slam the keys with his fingers flat. His poor tech didnt stop him.
     
  5. kingbee

    kingbee

    Apr 18, 2006
    Just remember that the players with unique and original styles that we celebrate are exceptional. It's like saying that it's okay to drop out of high school because the guy who owns Domino's never graduated.

    The point with technique is that it represent the refined tools of many musicians over many years. Simply put, proper technique works and it offers up solutions to many playing challenges. You may have found your own solution to certain challenges with a totally original technique, but as you grow as a player you may encounter challenges that your technique may not be able to meet.

    I played for years with my right thumb resting on the pickguard because it gave me stability and accuracy. But it severely limited my ability to play chords or to pick the strings anywhere along their length. When I started taking jazz lessons, the first thing my teacher had me do was play with a floating hand. I sounded like crap for a few weeks but eventually I grew to prefer this new approach (and the others he encouraged me to adopt).

    Playing in an unorthodox way is fine if it's comfortable and gives you the sound you want. But don't discount the value of proper technique simply because there are good players out there who succeed without it.
     

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